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Farm Needs 252 or 350p

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    That's in interesting side bar. I don't do much spray arc, but when I do, all I have for gas is 75/25. If I can swap and just use 90/10 for majority of my stuff, but still have the spray arc capability, that helps. <br />
    <br />
    Maybe I'll just get a bottle of 90/10 next time I swap out my gas and see how she chooches.

    Leave a comment:


  • gnforge
    replied
    H80N<br />
    Yeper I agree. That's all I use anymore 90/10 for all my steel welding in shop. <br />
    And 75/25 with dual shield on road work. <br />
    Works great and saves on inventory.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by gnforge View Post
    AL5052 <br />
    Alum is 100% Argon<br />
    Steel is 90/10 for pulse. <br />
    If you look in your chart on 350-P all pulse steel settings are based on 90/10 and also metal core pulse is 90/10 <br />
    Under mig, settings are based on 75/25 for steel wire and 90/10 for metal core wire.
    FWIW 90/10 (C-10) can be used for pulsed spray transfer and short-circuiting transfer

    http://www.praxair.com/gases/gas-mix...g-gas-mixtures

    http://www.praxair.com/-/media/praxa...8352.pdf?la=en

    Leave a comment:


  • gnforge
    replied
    AL5052 <br />
    Alum is 100% Argon<br />
    Steel is 90/10 for pulse. <br />
    If you look in your chart on 350-P all pulse steel settings are based on 90/10 and also metal core pulse is 90/10 <br />
    Under mig, settings are based on 75/25 for steel wire and 90/10 for metal core wire.

    Leave a comment:


  • AL5052
    replied
    Farmer Marty,
    Not sure if it has already been mentioned or not but the 350P when used in Pulse Mode is designed to be used with 100% Argon because the Argon provides a better / stable arc. I have had a 350P for about 12 years now and I really like the smooth arc and nice beads it produces in pulse mode. You may know this but at lower amperage settings on a MIG unit without Pulse mode you are using "globular" transfer which is not as smooth or clean, more spatter. At higher amperage settings on thicker materials your MIG unit will be achieving "SPRAY" transfer which is a very stable arc and smooth weld deposit, unfortunately this can't be achieved at lower amperage settings required for thinner metals like Gates etc in your case, that is until Miller came out with PULSE mode. Basically in Pulse mode you machine is achieving "SPRAY" transfer but intermittently, thus the term PULSE. So you get the smooth arc, and weld bead of SPRAY transfer but buy pulsing / interrupting the arc your able to use it on thin metals. I really like the PULSE mode, it is easy to switch from PULSE to regular MIg, just remember its designed for 100% Argon and you can run .035 or .045 wire. Hope this was useful information for you.

    Leave a comment:


  • ccawgc
    replied
    Only one thing to add about pulse. The gas mix is different. 90/10 to 98/2. Pulse uses spray arc mix. short arc mix is 75/25.

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by gnforge View Post
    Pulse is I great feature and not just for sheet metal repair. <br />
    I do a lot of under ground reamer rebuild and a lot of times need to build up areas 1-1:2 " wide and 1" thick or build up 1" <br />
    A lot of these are 4130 steel so it needs pre heat and stays very hot wile welding. Most of time I use alloy wire in metal core with pulse mode. Pulse helps keeps inter pass heat down and is very clean. Produces very good build up weld and heat is much easer to keep in range. <br />
    Also pulse allows me to weld 1/8" with .045 wire so I no longer use any .035. Saves in switch over time. <br />
    If I want or need heat in a weld I'll use mig. If I want to keep heat to minimum or have very poor fit & or need to fill in area I'll use pulse. <br />
    So pulse is very useful in very light to thick metal, it's not a fix everything but a super useful tool in box. <br />
    One down fall of pulse is its no benefit with dual shield. But dual shield is fast freeze anyway so don't really need it. <br />
    For me in shop is wire, mig & pulse. In field is all dual shield unless weather is very bad then intershield or good old stick. <br />
    Like I said in beginning I've had both and you will hv to pry my cold dead hands off 350-P.
    +1........... I love my MM350P

    Leave a comment:


  • gnforge
    replied
    Pulse is I great feature and not just for sheet metal repair. <br />
    I do a lot of under ground reamer rebuild and a lot of times need to build up areas 1-1:2 " wide and 1" thick or build up 1" <br />
    A lot of these are 4130 steel so it needs pre heat and stays very hot wile welding. Most of time I use alloy wire in metal core with pulse mode. Pulse helps keeps inter pass heat down and is very clean. Produces very good build up weld and heat is much easer to keep in range. <br />
    Also pulse allows me to weld 1/8" with .045 wire so I no longer use any .035. Saves in switch over time. <br />
    If I want or need heat in a weld I'll use mig. If I want to keep heat to minimum or have very poor fit & or need to fill in area I'll use pulse. <br />
    So pulse is very useful in very light to thick metal, it's not a fix everything but a super useful tool in box. <br />
    One down fall of pulse is its no benefit with dual shield. But dual shield is fast freeze anyway so don't really need it. <br />
    For me in shop is wire, mig & pulse. In field is all dual shield unless weather is very bad then intershield or good old stick. <br />
    Like I said in beginning I've had both and you will hv to pry my cold dead hands off 350-P.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    I would probably go 252 for steel in a farm shop, so much cheaper and you don't need pulse. It would be great for body work.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Farmer Marty View Post
    All these responses have been terrific. I am heading out next week to buy a 350p. I have just one question. There are lots of times i am welding a 1/8 to a 1/4 inch piece of metal to a 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick square tubing. In the past the old buzz box would melt the smaller metal and burn holes through it by the time it heated up the thicker metal enought. Will pulse mode help this?
    Pulse will help.... But you should do just fine in regular mig mode...

    Here is a link to the Operators manual... to help familiarize yourself with it's operation and features...

    https://www.millerwelds.com/files/ow...1327AH_MIL.pdf

    You will LOVE that MM350P..................

    BTW... you want the regular "Millermatic 350P" NOT the specialized Aluminum only version (MM350P ALUMINUM)
    The full featured "Millermatic 350P" has excellent performance on on the full range of metals ..... including steel... aluminum... and other non ferrous metals...
    Last edited by H80N; 07-20-2016, 09:38 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Farmer Marty
    replied
    All these responses have been terrific. I am heading out next week to buy a 350p. I have just one question. There are lots of times i am welding a 1/8 to a 1/4 inch piece of metal to a 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick square tubing. In the past the old buzz box would melt the smaller metal and burn holes through it by the time it heated up the thicker metal enought. Will pulse mode help this?

    Leave a comment:


  • E350
    replied
    Farmer Marty: I am a relative newbie with a 350p, which I love. H80N and gnforge are some of the 350p gurus here. Listen to them. If you have the money for the 350p, it is a pretty sweet machine in my newbie opinion.

    It does have flip down charts on the front for both mig and pulse modes.

    Mig chart variables are your wire size, metal type and metal thickness. Look on the chart where those variables intersect and the chart will give you two variables which you manually set with two dials: the volts and wire speed.

    Pulse chart variables are your wire size, metal type and metal thickness. Look on the chart where those variables intersect and the chart will give you one variable which you manually set with one of the dials: wire speed (which is a faster speed for the same metal type and metal thickness than when in mig mode - why?). In pulse mode the machine apparently sets the arc length for you automatically but you can adjust it manually from there. (I have no idea why you would adjust the arc length and what it does for you when you do adjust it longer or shorter.)

    I have played a little with pulse mode, but hopefully you will buy a 350p and ask these gurus to gives us a tutorial on how to use it in pulse mode.

    And if you are interested in welding aluminum in the future (like me) this is a great video regarding Mig vs Tig and it isn't even about pulse which is a feature of the 350p:

    https://youtu.be/3vySksqFcsM
    Last edited by E350; 07-15-2016, 05:53 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Also inverters require less power to produce more output!!
    If you want to be able to learn to do more then the 350-P is great....
    Farms require all types of metal repair to keep running.
    For just plain old steel for just general welding, you won't exceed the MM252 with only 50 amps input.
    But if you want your mind blown, the 350-P will certainly do that !!
    I like mine for the POWER and the ability to use push pull pulse aluminum.
    I like the pulse spray on steel also.
    For just plain old steel I might still go for the 350. It's just so nice once you become accustomed to it.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by gnforge View Post
    Pulse no big deal. If you can mig you can pulse mig. There is a chart same as with mig. Takes a little getting used to but really not much different than mig. Just gives you a lot more flexibility with lighter metal and with fill-in, also if need to keep temp down but still keep penetration weld integrity. If you have poor fit up and need to fill a lot I'll just switch to pulse. And it welds fast in pulse and produces high quality weld. So all in all its a great tool to have in your box.
    +1 Well PUT......

    Leave a comment:


  • gnforge
    replied
    Pulse no big deal. If you can mig you can pulse mig. There is a chart same as with mig. Takes a little getting used to but really not much different than mig. Just gives you a lot more flexibility with lighter metal and with fill-in, also if need to keep temp down but still keep penetration weld integrity. If you have poor fit up and need to fill a lot I'll just switch to pulse. And it welds fast in pulse and produces high quality weld. So all in all its a great tool to have in your box.

    Leave a comment:

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