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New mig welder won't feed stainless steel wire.

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
    Ryan, you just hit on a question I would REALLY like to hear a definitive answer to. I learned the "roll the bottle around" thing years ago (and I do it), and still hear it recommended. I have read other guidance that says that is just crazy, that gases mix absolutely evenly on their own, and I'm just believing an old wives' tale. However, it seems to me that gases with different specific gravities would stratify. I understand completely that if I were to discharge a heavy gas like CO2, and a light one, like He, into the room, the CO2 would fall to the floor and the He would rise to the ceiling. Is it different under pressure in a bottle? Any Chem experts here who can explain what's correct and why? I know, my ignorance and lack of attentiveness in Chem classes all those years ago is showing......
    boyle's law............??.

    You might find this old thread interesting

    Originally posted by Bodybagger View Post
    If you ask your local gas supplier about Boyle's Law, they will probably think it has something to do with large sores.

    Ask a chemical engineer.

    What you will find is that it takes a great deal of effort to separate gases once they are mixed. It does not happen on its own. That would violate the laws of thermodynamics. There's a little thing called "Entropy" that prevents things like messy houses from cleaning themselves up spontaneously.

    If gasses separated on their own without an extraordinary amount of energy input, the multibillon dollar air liquefaction industry would probably like to find out about it!

    In a thousand years, your steel mix would be homogeneous, but it will probably leak out before then.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...d-gas-question



    Last edited by H80N; 07-02-2016, 09:26 PM.

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Ryan, you just hit on a question I would REALLY like to hear a definitive answer to. I learned the "roll the bottle around" thing years ago (and I do it), and still hear it recommended. I have read other guidance that says that is just crazy, that gases mix absolutely evenly on their own, and I'm just believing an old wives' tale. However, it seems to me that gases with different specific gravities would stratify. I understand completely that if I were to discharge a heavy gas like CO2, and a light one, like He, into the room, the CO2 would fall to the floor and the He would rise to the ceiling. Is it different under pressure in a bottle? Any Chem experts here who can explain what's correct and why? I know, my ignorance and lack of attentiveness in Chem classes all those years ago is showing......

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I use tri-mix and too have a small bottle since I don't do it a lot. I tend to tig it if I can. If that bottle sits up for long, they say to roll it around on the floor and then give it a good purge to mix the gases back up good. Seems to work for me.

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  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Originally posted by wagin View Post
    A question....what shield gas are you running to mig ss? Will pure argon work or is a tri-mix required?
    Personally for the last 25 years I have been running pure Argon. But now that I work for the LWS/Miller dealer I am getting a small bottle of Tri Mix ready. But I have to buy a small bottle and have it sent out and filled. We have 300 cu ft bottles on hand for sale but I don't need that big. The company that owned that welder uses Tri Mix...Bob

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  • wagin
    replied
    A question....what shield gas are you running to mig ss? Will pure argon work or is a tri-mix required?

    Leave a comment:


  • JoseBower
    replied
    Nice info,Thanks for sharing this information with all.

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  • griff01
    replied
    Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post
    A local company here in these parts bought a Lincoln Power Mig 256 from us a few months ago. Couldn't talk them into a Miller. It is only using .030 SS wire and doesn't feed it properly and constant bird nesting. So today they brought the welder back for me to try it out. We had to change the electric plug and when i flipped on the power switch and pressed the trigger it hit me what the problem was. I figured the liner was too small just by the way the gun felt in my hand. So i removed the liner and it had a .025-.030 liner in it. Replaced it with a .030-.035 and the machine welds perfect. 5 minute fix. Figured the wire was getting hung up in the smaller liner thus the birds nest. Everyone is happy now...Bob
    Thanks for sharing that info. Sometimes, what is supposed to be correct doesn't work.
    That's where your experience comes in very handy.

    I was involved in helping my LWS solve a problem with a MIG machine a few years ago that did not have the gas port drilled that goes to the gun.
    I didn't fix the problem but I found it for them.
    Stuff sometimes happens.

    Griff

    Leave a comment:


  • aametalmaster
    started a topic New mig welder won't feed stainless steel wire.

    New mig welder won't feed stainless steel wire.

    A local company here in these parts bought a Lincoln Power Mig 256 from us a few months ago. Couldn't talk them into a Miller. It is only using .030 SS wire and doesn't feed it properly and constant bird nesting. So today they brought the welder back for me to try it out. We had to change the electric plug and when i flipped on the power switch and pressed the trigger it hit me what the problem was. I figured the liner was too small just by the way the gun felt in my hand. So i removed the liner and it had a .025-.030 liner in it. Replaced it with a .030-.035 and the machine welds perfect. 5 minute fix. Figured the wire was getting hung up in the smaller liner thus the birds nest. Everyone is happy now...Bob
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