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Miller Syncrowave 180SD welder repair shop in Charleston, S.C.

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  • #16
    Pic2
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    • #17
      Pic3
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      • #18
        Send the board in for overhaul, its the one behind the front panel, I'm a Miller tech, however, I don't have ESP. I don't have a board handy. I did research the schematic and came up with that answer. Now I do this for fun, on my free time and I don't get paid by Miller. I won/t know the specs on that specific part without looking at it and recording the numbers.

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        • #19
          Cool. I removed both boards. A smaller square one and a longer rectangular one that the control knobs mount too. THANKS for all the excellent help!!! I'll look for a Q1 board. Thanks again cruizer!! 👍👍👍👍👍

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          • #20
            Some clarification-Q1 is not the board. Cruizer was giving you what is called a reference designator for a component on the board. Transistors on a board are generally labeled Q1, Q2, etc. Resistors are R1, R2, etc. you need to look at the printing on the board and find a transistor with Q1 printed beside it. The part number will be on the transistor, and it may or may not start with 2N... Do web searches on the numbers on the transistor. Mouser and Digi-key are two great sources. If you are not experienced soldering high-density PC boards, please find someone who is and has appropriate eqpt. As Cruizer said, boards are expensive. You don't want an expensive "oops, ...."

            Good luck!
            Last edited by Aeronca41; 05-25-2016, 11:21 PM.

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            • #21
              Thanks for the clarification!!! Much appreciated😊😊

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              • #22
                Hope you can find Q1! When you find the part number, another source I didn't mention earlier is Newark.

                BTW, When you're handling the boards you need to be very cautious about static electricity. It's good to have a conductive mat to set the board on, and ideally you should be grounded by touching a good ground before touching the board, or better yet wearing a static dissipative wrist strap that's hooked to a good ground. Some components are very sensitive to static-don't be carrying the board across any carpet.

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                • #23
                  The board in question must be the square board immediately behind the case. It mounts to the long rectangular one. I did find Q2 just looking at the pics I took last night. Will look when I get home but I think I'm going to opt for a new board. Too many horror stories about bad/non existent repairs. This is the only repair I've had to do to this machine in the 18yrs I've had it so if it's expensive but fixes it.....I'm good. Think I want to upgrade to the welders that clean and control penetration and bead width. Mine's pretty simple.
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                  • #24
                    Understand. It has served you well. You could find this to be maybe a $10 fix if Cruizer's guess is right-and he's pretty smart. If it were mine I'd see if I could find the transistor but understand if you choose not to go that way. Just an opinion.

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                    • #25
                      Found Q1. It's a 4 pin transistor? I don't see any part numbers.
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                      • #26
                        Unless someone has a service book with a parts list for the board it looks like you're out of luck except to send it in for overhaul. Unusual not to find a part number on a component but it does happen occasionally.

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                        • #27
                          Yeah....it's probably a little smaller than a pea so I'm not sure where the part number would be. I guess if I desolder it, there might be a number under it where it mounts to the board.

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                          • #28
                            Nope its there on top etched in. A double magnifing glass works best.

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                            • #29
                              Thanks....I'll try that 😊😊😊

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                              • #30
                                Didn't find any mumbers. The top has a clear coat. There appears to be 5 or 6 of these shiny little pea sized squares. Maybe it's not a transistor??

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