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  • Meltedmetal
    replied
    6011 will run Ac or DC- or DC+ but if you are actually getting 130 amps that is very high for 3/32" rod. If you look here you can find the recommended range for Lincoln electrodes http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-us...olnElectric%29
    You can order their "Welding Consumables" book for free or just download it.
    You can also find similar information on the Hobart brand of electrodes on their web site as in here http://www.hobartbrothers.com/produc...lectrodes.html
    Both are excellent resources to put you in the ball park and both have recommendations for MIG wire as well. You can download Hobart"s catalogue as well.---Meltedmetal

    You might also try 1/8" 6011 as you may find it is easier to run.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    7018 is a DC rod unless the package says it's for AC. <br />
    <br />
    There are benefits for both, but altogether, DC is a smoother arc. <br />
    <br />
    Growing up in the farm, I didn't even know there were other welding rods besides 6011 and 7018. Some people call 6011 a farmer rod, probably because it burns through rust, paint and cow poop. Getting acceptable at running those rods will make you happy. <br />
    <br />
    I prefer to use Lincoln fleetweld 5p+ in a 6010 and I've come to like the Lincoln Excalibur 7018. I have heard a lot of good about the esab atom arc 7018, so I bought 10lbs of it, just haven't used it yet. My rod oven only holds 10lbs. Which is another problem to think about. Your 7018 doesn't like moisture. I don't burn through it like a lot of guys do, so I only buy 10lbs at a time and I have a small rod oven. It needs to be dry and kept warm to keep out the water or it will make you sad when you weld. <br />
    <br />
    I also prefer to use 1/8" rod most of the time. With the 3/32 I find I'm too dadgum shakey and getting started with it is a pain because I have steady hands like Hillary Clinton tells the truth. It's amplified with the whip and pause technique I use with the 6010/6011 rods too.

    Leave a comment:


  • buffumjr
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    The only thing "easy" about mig welding is doing it poorly. It may look good, but it's easy to have cold lap and lack of fusion. I hear it all too often, "mig welding is easy." I assure you, there are plenty of things that are not what you expect....penetration, fusion, etc. <br />
    <br />
    6011 is a rod for AC welding. Although many people are finding them useful on DC inverter machines that won't run cellulose coated rods like 6010. That type of rod (6010 & 6011) also requires some sort of manipulation, generally, to run well. Whip and pause, some sort of weave if your amperage is set high enough, something. <br />
    <br />
    Stick is tough. I've found getting good at it is an excellent addition to your arsenal. Lately, I've found myself using the nastiest, rustiest, oldest metal I had to do a few jobs. Stick was the process of choice due to the poor surface condition of the steel. It's worth getting good at. I generally use 6011 and 7018 on pretty much all my jobs for stick welding. Which is not a surprise really.
    OK, you are advising I try AC mode with 6011. Will do. Econotig's got both. Should I AC 7018, too?

    The thing it took awhile to get used to doing in MIG was heat. Don't be afraid of amperage. The Miller 210 can put out more than I've ever used. Nasty welds until I cranked 'er up. If I was gouging the edges, I knew I had penetration. V'ing the metal first doesn't hurt, either, and yes, cleaning helps. In machining, sometimes a piece of raw material would be a scoche short, and I could MIG fill an extension. Saved a trip to my friendly neighborhood industrial surplus store. LOVE my MIG!

    Antmore, I just use my torch for bending, cutting, brazing, and silver soldering with high silver alloy. Now that I have TIG, all my thin stuff will be TIG.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    buffumjr.................

    somebody turned the lights off in your avatar............



    AAAHHhhh... Lights back on... much better...

    Last edited by H80N; 05-21-2016, 07:51 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    The only thing "easy" about mig welding is doing it poorly. It may look good, but it's easy to have cold lap and lack of fusion. I hear it all too often, "mig welding is easy." I assure you, there are plenty of things that are not what you expect....penetration, fusion, etc. <br />
    <br />
    6011 is a rod for AC welding. Although many people are finding them useful on DC inverter machines that won't run cellulose coated rods like 6010. That type of rod (6010 & 6011) also requires some sort of manipulation, generally, to run well. Whip and pause, some sort of weave if your amperage is set high enough, something. <br />
    <br />
    Stick is tough. I've found getting good at it is an excellent addition to your arsenal. Lately, I've found myself using the nastiest, rustiest, oldest metal I had to do a few jobs. Stick was the process of choice due to the poor surface condition of the steel. It's worth getting good at. I generally use 6011 and 7018 on pretty much all my jobs for stick welding. Which is not a surprise really.

    Leave a comment:


  • buffumjr
    replied
    Been practicing stick. Egad, but it's a tough skill to learn. MIG was so much easier. The trouble I am having is starting the arc. If I have the voltage high enough to maintain an arc reliably, the weld shows symptoms of over amperage. If I cut back the amps, I get stuck a lot. When in lower amp mode, when the arc does deign to start, I get a very nice looking weld, though it is a bit high in the center.

    The stick is 3/32" 6011. The current is between 80% and 85% for a 130 amp capability.

    I spent a lot of time cleaning the metal I'm practicing on.

    Making myself a deal. I will not consider upgrading until I get good in both TIG and stick.

    Stick is tough.

    Leave a comment:


  • buffumjr
    replied
    The Lincoln was the Precision TIG® 225 TIG Welder - K2533-2 .

    The USAWeld product DOES look good.

    Saving slowly. Next year, I'll be ready.

    Still practicing TIG and 3/32 stick.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I have an HTP 221 and use it all the time. I need a water cooler for it, that's about all I can say I'd do again. The only thing I don't like about it is if you want to stick weld with it, you must unplug the foot pedal. Unless you want to control the stick arc with the foot pedal that is.

    What I need to do is find some time to get Helga up and running at full speed...thinking about a DIY water cooler for that one.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    What model was that again...?? the link goes into space..??

    At the $2400 range you hve some better options

    While Italian made & a small company... these guys have MUCH better rep for support than Linc..

    http://www.usaweld.com/TIG-WELDER-In...70221-12.5.htm

    At least they stand behind their stuff... unlike the little Lincs that have a rep for detonating

    Not a Miller... But I have heard good things about them...

    BTW... Have you looked at the Miller SYNC 210 Package..??

    https://www.millerwelds.com/equipmen...10-tig-welders

    It's a nice package and comes COMPLETE... ready to run... if you compare fully equipped welders.. it looks very good.... ( USA Made BTW..)

    https://www.millerwelds.com/~/media/.../c/b/ad4-6.pdf

    .
    Last edited by H80N; 05-20-2016, 11:46 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • buffumjr
    replied
    DC Only?!? The Sneaky Devils!

    #%&R(&%!! The search goes on.

    Who knows? Maybe, all unwittingly, I made the best purchase possible, all by accident. I just wish it had a little more oomph in stick. But then, if I keep to 3/32 electrodes, all is well within capabilities.

    OK. A step up in Lincoln.
    http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-us...incolnElectric)
    $2,300. 2/3 the price of Syncrowave, half the weight, and roughly the same size as Econotig. Would fit on the cart. A lot more power than Econotig. Probably do 1/8 and 5/32 electrodes just fine.

    (heavy sigh) Probably parts made in Lesotho, sub-assembly in Myanmar, and final assembly in Uruguay. All the liberals in my youth yearned for equality across the globe. Be careful what you wish for.
    Last edited by buffumjr; 05-20-2016, 07:17 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Well put. <br />
    <br />
    In addition, I don't think I'd want a machine that is so rarely asked for or used that it's made as its ordered. It's not a piano, it's a welding machine. Good luck getting parts for a welding machine that's in such limited production. <br />
    <br />
    Usually when stuff breaks, you need the part yesterday, not in ten weeks. I've learned my lesson the hard way, get gear with readily available parts from my local parts house. That goes for all my stuff, not just my welders.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    One of my concerns is that this seems to be a step DOWN from the Econotig....

    Do you really want to give up the ability to TIG Aluminum..??

    Am further concerned that you re getting poor advice at the LWS...... "a lot of wave shaping capability" What wave shaping...??? it is a DC only welder... So......... no WAVESHAPING....

    Availability?? "expect the welder to take about 10 weeks for delivery. His story is they don't mass produce these, and build them as needed. (weird story)"

    Does sound like a "STORY"....... too many things do not add up to me.... am afraid that some uninformed LWS counter guy is selling you a Burro and calling it a Quarterhorse....

    Just asking that you check the facts... It is YOUR money... Would hate to see you mislead...

    Unfortunately... a large percentage of LWS counter guys know very little about welding and welding equip... sad but true...
    Last edited by H80N; 05-19-2016, 10:10 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Yup. Just because it's an American company doesn't mean their gear is made here. My little Lincoln wire feed is made in Mexico. <br />
    <br />
    The reality is that we can't get everything made in America, and not everything from overseas is junk. If you're happy with your purchase then good deal. I hope that machine gives your years of flawless service. <br />
    <br />
    I have no earthly idea what that machine is you speak of, but glad you found something that fits your needs.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by buffumjr View Post
    Found it! Lincoln Invertec V-160T Pulse. Won't be ready for it for a long time, but, it's there. My Miller dealer says to expect the welder to take about 10 weeks for delivery. His story is they don't mass produce these, and build them as needed. (weird story)

    http://www.lincolnelectric.com/asset...oln3/im738.pdf

    American company. Parts support. Warranty. Mainstream product. Recent manufacture. About $1,400. Weighs a little over 24 lbs. Can fit on the welding cart I made for the Econotig. Comes with very little.
    • 115V Input cord (10 ft) and Plug (NEMA 5-15P)
    • 20 Amp Plug (NEMA 5-20P)
    • Twist-Mate™ Torch Adapter for PTA-9 or -17 One-piece Torch
    • Fully Adjustable Shoulder Strap
    • Work Clamp and Cable

    You have to buy the torch, the stinger, the foot pedal, the regulator, the partridge in the pear tree!

    Still, $1,400, for an American machine, with a lot of wave shaping capability. Doesn't do plasma, but if the machine breaks, there are repair facilities all over.

    Oddly, the 200 and the 225 have less wave, pre and post flow shaping control than the 160. Too bad. I'd lay out the extra bucks for the extra power, with the same controls. Who makes these design decisions?

    Who knows? I may never need it. But, at least I found it.


    BE CAREFUL.... American company.... but much of their product is now imported

    You are aware that this is a DC ONLY TIG.... so NO AC TIG for ALUMINUM....

    http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-us...olnElectric%29


    Originally posted by cruizer View Post
    Lincoln small tigs made in Italy and Poland = Crap

    Originally posted by cruizer View Post

    In the past I've told potential buyers to look at the serial#, the first letter tells you the buyer where its made "U" for instance is Cleveland, "I" is Italy, "P" is Poland.
    Last edited by H80N; 05-18-2016, 05:47 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • buffumjr
    replied
    Found it! Lincoln Invertec V-160T Pulse. Won't be ready for it for a long time, but, it's there. My Miller dealer says to expect the welder to take about 10 weeks for delivery. His story is they don't mass produce these, and build them as needed. (weird story)

    http://www.lincolnelectric.com/asset...oln3/im738.pdf

    American company. Parts support. Warranty. Mainstream product. Recent manufacture. About $1,400. Weighs a little over 24 lbs. Can fit on the welding cart I made for the Econotig. Comes with very little.
    • 115V Input cord (10 ft) and Plug (NEMA 5-15P)
    • 20 Amp Plug (NEMA 5-20P)
    • Twist-Mate™ Torch Adapter for PTA-9 or -17 One-piece Torch
    • Fully Adjustable Shoulder Strap
    • Work Clamp and Cable
    You have to buy the torch, the stinger, the foot pedal, the regulator, the partridge in the pear tree!

    Still, $1,400, for an American machine, with a lot of wave shaping capability. Doesn't do plasma, but if the machine breaks, there are repair facilities all over.

    Oddly, the 200 and the 225 have less wave, pre and post flow shaping control than the 160. Too bad. I'd lay out the extra bucks for the extra power, with the same controls. Who makes these design decisions?

    Who knows? I may never need it. But, at least I found it.

    Leave a comment:

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