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Converting Miller Numbers

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Thou shalt not speak the "L" word amongst men...
    He just likes to spout disregarding any facts.... his time might be better spent learning those facts


    Originally posted by buffumjr View Post
    Yeah, but the PRICE! Wow. Syncrowave, with configurable TIG, $4,300+ Owww. Lincoln Invertec 225 $2,300. And so on...

    .

    Whining on price in an apples to oranges comparison is waste of time if the machines are not comparable

    you are comparing a conventional transformer/chopper TIG ... Precision TIGĀ® 225 TIG Welder $2,590

    http://www.weldingsuppliesfromioc.co...FZNbhgod_dkJPA

    to an advanced inverter TIG...Miller Syncrowave 210 MIG, TIG & Stick Welder Package (951616) $2,735


    http://www.weldingsuppliesfromioc.co...51616?___SID=U

    and the Miller also does MIG & comes with an included spoolgun..

    buffumjr is all WET.... on this subject
    Folks around here are not so dumb... and do not suffer attempts by any trying to blow smoke up the proverbial dress with much humor... ....

    BTW there is no "Lincoln Invertec 225" in their present product lineup... nor has there ever been..
    Last edited by H80N; 05-22-2016, 11:04 AM.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Thou shalt not speak the "L" word amongst men...

    Leave a comment:


  • buffumjr
    replied
    Yeah, but the PRICE! Wow. Syncrowave, with configurable TIG, $4,300+ Owww. Lincoln Invertec 225 $2,300. And so on...

    What I was talking about was connecting a couple of wires from inside the box to a board that drives a three digit LED panel. I'm sure there are wire-heads out there who have done that sort of thing. During the Commodore-64 and Atari 800 days, there were all sorts of garage-built gadgets. The Timex-Sinclair was nothing but the CPU and memory. Everything was a plugged in peripheral. Many were designed and built by hobbyists. I'm not talking THAT extreme, just a three digit panel.

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  • Broccoli1
    replied
    Well those are newer machines and Miller does offer the same readouts on their new TIG machines.

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  • buffumjr
    replied
    Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post

    Your manual has a chart for the % to amperage.

    https://www.millerwelds.com/files/ow.../O303V_MIL.pdf

    section 6-1
    Thanks. Yes. That will be sooooooo useful! I'll tape that to the side of the machine. Still, a readout, like on the Longevity or the AHP, would help with fine tuning. If some kludgemeister out there hacks a readout for the Econotig, I'd be happy to download it, and try it out.

    Thrilled with my Econotig. So far...

    Leave a comment:


  • Broccoli1
    replied
    Originally posted by buffumjr View Post
    Hi, Guys!

    I have an Econotig. Old machine. 2003? Just bought it. Same problem with the dial. It gives the current in percentages, rather than amps. I see from Jor's post I'm not the only one trying to figure this out. Yeah, what I plan to do is learn what it means by experience. Lotta waste, there.

    Still, if you Miller engineers are reading this, the actual volts or amps would be nicer than trying to WAG from a percentage. The Chinese machines mostly have readouts that give volts or amps, rather than percentages.

    I have a 211, too. Since 2002. Will NEVER sell it! I find that going one number higher than the chart says for thicker steel gives stronger welds. Bites in better. For the thinner steel, the chart is very close.
    Your manual has a chart for the % to amperage.

    https://www.millerwelds.com/files/ow.../O303V_MIL.pdf

    section 6-1

    Leave a comment:


  • Broccoli1
    replied
    http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtal...ire-Feed-Speed

    Leave a comment:


  • jor
    replied
    Thanks to all. I think I'll try the destruction scheme. Sounds like a good way to learn.
    jor

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Also take into consideration your technique. A different technique will give you a different result with the same machine settings. I can't say for sure, but I bet the digits on the dial and the recommendations on the inside of the door would be closer to correct without consideration of electrode manipulation.

    Leave a comment:


  • aametalmaster
    replied
    I have been mig welding for 38 years and prob 33 of them was with an unmetered machine or a machine with a broken meter. I agree if its too cold turn it up and too hot turn it down. Since most steel isn't exactly the same thickness you get used to what you need when you see it and where to set it. Now if you are welding off a set of parameters to a WP then that's different but I don't think a hobby welding machine will be used. But that's just me...Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • buffumjr
    replied
    The most fun thing to do is to create something to destroy it. Make up several pieces of freshly cleaned steel, all in the same configuration for welding. Decide what parameters you want to test. Test one on a joint. Destroy the piece with a hammer. Record how many blows, how heavy the hammer, etc. Vary the parameter and weld the next. Destroy that one and record. Do that until you run out of parameters. A fun day beating stuff to pieces! In science, this is called "empiricism", or doing it so you can see for yourself. By the time you are done, you'll have had a good time making noise, and a great handle on what works, and what doesn't, and what just doesn't matter.

    I've had my welder since 2002, and I'm not yet a master. How did you get there so fast?

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  • jor
    replied
    I don't think the actual voltage number is that important. If it is too cold turn it up, if it is too hot turn it down. When you find what you want, record the knob setting for future reference.
    Yea, I'm just curious. I've now logged about three hours of actual welding so I'm well on my way to becoming a master welder! Anyhow, after laying down some pretty decent welds on 1/8" I started fooling around with the voltage and wire speed to see what would happen. I now have a pretty good idea of what to expect when the voltage is too high or too low and the wire speed is to high or too low. I'll keep looking for the real voltage number. Thanks.
    jor

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  • buffumjr
    replied
    Hi, Guys!

    I have an Econotig. Old machine. 2003? Just bought it. Same problem with the dial. It gives the current in percentages, rather than amps. I see from Jor's post I'm not the only one trying to figure this out. Yeah, what I plan to do is learn what it means by experience. Lotta waste, there.

    Still, if you Miller engineers are reading this, the actual volts or amps would be nicer than trying to WAG from a percentage. The Chinese machines mostly have readouts that give volts or amps, rather than percentages.

    I have a 211, too. Since 2002. Will NEVER sell it! I find that going one number higher than the chart says for thicker steel gives stronger welds. Bites in better. For the thinner steel, the chart is very close.

    Leave a comment:


  • Meltedmetal
    replied
    I think he is referring to page 29 in the manual which is the weld parameters chart. The counter at the top of the screen shows it as page 33. I don't think the actual voltage number is that important. If it is too cold turn it up, if it is too hot turn it down. When you find what you want, record the knob setting for future reference. You could employ a helper and install a volt meter on the system to check while you are welding but I suspect you would get some fluctuation in voltage anyway depending on how well you can maintain a constant stick out.---Meltedmetal

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  • jor
    replied
    Thanks for the tip on ipm, Ryan. I will do that tomorrow.
    Bob, I have that same manual; page 33 is blank for notes. Couldn't find anything that indicated the numbers to voltage.
    jor

    Leave a comment:

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