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  • Indiana John
    replied
    FWIW, many years ago I bought a new Lincoln SP100 110v MIG at the LWS. I bought the optional 30A cordset that was designed to plug into a special 110 socket that is connected to a 30a circuit. I ran it with .030 mild steel wire with straight CO2 gas. I could reliably weld 1/4" steel with it. May be hard to believe, but it's true. I had a hard time believing it too, but they were solid welds with good penetration. I originally ran C25, but switched to CO2. Got more spatter of course, but seemed to give me a hotter arc for better penetration. I used .023 on sheetmetal with very good results. 110v welders can be very capable. At least that one was for me! Now running a Hobart 180 (220v) for MIG duty. Picked it up at the local pawn shop a couple of years ago for a bargain price, and have been very happy with it so far. Also have a Campbell Hausfeld 110 flux core a buddy gave me, that I wouldn't have given $5 for..... It works, but thats about the best you can say for it. I'd stick with Miller, Lincoln, or Hobart. Any of the big names even used will be a better buy than the "off brands".

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I didn't make that comment to make someone think you can't run a 50amp welder on a dryer plug because, clearly, you can. It's just not going to give it full power on 30 amps. Not sure what you're welding, but I couldn't have my welders on 30 amps and be happy. <br />
    <br />
    My point was that if your particular dryer has a 50 amp breaker, you should probably check the wires in the socket and see what you're pulling that amperage through. You wouldn't want your wires to be the weak point and your house wouldn't be the first with a fire hazard for a dryer circuit. Battleships and locomotives notwithstanding.

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by buffumjr View Post

    If you're not repairing battleships, main battle tanks, or the boilers on 2-8-8-8-8-2 locomotives in your driveway, 30A will usually do.
    Really depends on the box you are plugging in...

    But 30Amps 220vac is not a lot

    I agree with Ryan's fire prevention outlook....

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  • buffumjr
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    I don't think it's safe to assume that your dryer outlet is 50 amps. In fact, from my experience, the dryer circuit is more than likely 30 amps. <br />
    <br />
    Open the socket up and take a look at the wires. If they are 10 ga and you have a 50 amp breaker on that circuit, you might want to practice your emergency fire escape plan. 10ga wire is rated for 30 amps. Every dryer in every house I've ever had has been 30 amps.
    Looking at the breaker tells a tale or two for that.

    Well, then, have Larry the Electrician upgrade her circuit when he puts in yours.

    If you're not repairing battleships, main battle tanks, or the boilers on 2-8-8-8-8-2 locomotives in your driveway, 30A will usually do.

    Last edited by buffumjr; 05-16-2016, 05:42 PM.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I don't think it's safe to assume that your dryer outlet is 50 amps. In fact, from my experience, the dryer circuit is more than likely 30 amps. <br />
    <br />
    Open the socket up and take a look at the wires. If they are 10 ga and you have a 50 amp breaker on that circuit, you might want to practice your emergency fire escape plan. 10ga wire is rated for 30 amps. Every dryer in every house I've ever had has been 30 amps.

    Leave a comment:


  • buffumjr
    replied
    I think the barrier, not yet mentioned, is the 220V outlet. Most folks crave the ease of 120V. It's everywhere.

    220V is easy, though. Your wife's dryer connection is 220V, and goes to 50A. If you need another, the electrician usually doesn't charge more than about $200 to put one in. One time expense. BE SURE to specify 50A, and hold firm to that. It's easier to use a machine needing 30A on a 50A circuit than a machine needing 50A on a 30A circuit.

    With a 120V machine, extension cord is 14 AWG. With 220, it's usually 10 AWG, or better yet, 8. You gotta make it. You CAN find stores that sell the cable.

    With a 220V outlet in place, the rest is easy. It opens up a whole new world of tooling. Mills, lathes, industrial drill presses, precision grinders, plasma cutters, not to mention all kinds of welders.

    Here are questions you need to ask yourself, when deciding.

    -Carryable or rollable? My 210 is rollable. If I want to carry it out of my house, transportation is difficult.
    -What am I going to be welding? Parameters given in prevous posts, here.
    -How much do I want to spend? Craigslist, Ebay, local paper or Pennysaver, talk to your local vo-tech or local government when they upgrade. Talk to local shops. Sometimes they upgrade, too. Sometimes you can get spectacular stuff FOR FREE!. or for pennies on the dollar.
    -Am I going to want to expand my skills? The answer to that is always YES.
    -How about the Chinese offerings? The watchword, here, is SUPPORT. Is local service available, or do you mail it back to China and wait three months? Yeah.
    -Can you try one out? A GREAT advantage.

    I own a Miller Econotig, bought on Craigslist for $550. I own a Miller 210 bought retail in 2002, for $1,400, with spool gun. Both are 220. Great machines. I saw the Econotig and jumped on it, though I knew next to nothing about it. I found a few things, but not enough. The price was the clincher. Good stick machine, but I wish it had more TIG features, for when I get better at TIG. Can't configure the wave. It is what it is. Got AC and DC, DCEN and DCEP, and amp percent, but that's all. Despite the size, may later upgrade to a Syncrowave, despite its elephantine size (450 lbs). Lots of Syncrowaves on CL.

    Hope this helps.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    If price is the issue, there are always lots of good used machines running around that can save you a good bit of money. Of all my machines, only two were brand spanking new when I got them.
    I agree....

    Many times a used "Quality" tool will represent a far better value than a new "Bargain" brand at similar cost...

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    If price is the issue, there are always lots of good used machines running around that can save you a good bit of money. Of all my machines, only two were brand spanking new when I got them.

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by samuel joff View Post

    Thank for your efforts. Looks like this one is better and cost effective. But this one Single Voltage?
    Better....??...Cost Effective... ???

    I would be very careful in shopping by price only.... expensive disapointment can follow ....

    What is the ACTUAL amperage output and Duty Cycle..??

    if it needs warranty repair... where do you take it....??..... what is it worth when you sell to upgrade...??

    look at the big picture.....
    Last edited by H80N; 05-04-2016, 07:58 AM.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    It appears that machine operates on 120v only.

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  • samuel joff
    replied
    Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post

    Tweco 141i: $585.00
    Thank for your efforts. Looks like this one is better and cost effective. But this one Single Voltage?

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I don't know where any of those machines are made. I have an auto arc 180, which is just a related Hobart and it's about a decade old...made in USA. I have a 120v Lincoln 140C I got from my LWS...hecho en Mexico.

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  • H80N
    replied
    Isn't the Tweco CHINESE Made.....???

    I would stay with MILLER or HOBART... BOTH U.S. Made

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  • Broccoli1
    replied
    Originally posted by samuel joff View Post

    which one do you suggest then? I would like to know about this.
    Tweco 141i: $585.00
    Tweco 211i : $912.00 Dual Voltage

    Hobart 140: $585.00
    Hobart 210MVP: $897.00 Dual Voltage

    Miller 141i: $755.00
    Miller 211i: $1,099.00 Dual Voltage

    http://store.cyberweld.com


    If I was staying with a 120v only machine I'd go with the Tweco 141i.

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    In my mind it becomes a matter of price and personal preference. Both Hobart and Miller are good machines. I would agree with 'Stang (see above in this thread) that I have a personal preference for continuously variable voltage control (Miller) over stepped voltage (Hobart). However, that said I have both a MM211 (which I would HIGHLY recommend as a first welder-a hobbyist may never outgrow it) and an antique MM200. While they are very different classes of machines, they have provided me with the opportunity to use both continuous voltage control (211) and stepped (200). Despite the preference for continuous control for fine adjustment, I have to say I have welded a lot of 16 ga tubing with the stepped control MM200 and have no issue with heat/penetration control. Does that carry over to the smaller stepped machines? I don't have one to compare, but I know people who use the stepped machines on light material and are quite happy with them. My personal thoughts-save your pennies for a MM211. If you can't afford that, and must buy a 120v machine (not recommended), I would go for the Miller 141 (variable) then, for even less money, the Hobart. However, if you must go to the lower cost Hobart, I don't think you should feel you are buying a "bad" machine quality-wise. It is a good machine. Just my two cents worth. Others may have different opinions. (Just a side comment-I bought my MM200 cheap with the idea of cleaning it up and selling for profit. Once I welded with it, I'll probably never sell it until I can't weld any more-it is just a wonderful machine-so smooth with a nice steady somewhat soft arc. A true top quality classic.)

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