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  • Hobart or Miller

    A friend of mine is in the market for a new MIG welder. Intended use is occasional car bodywork repair. I have found a lot of good reviews on both, see here . My questions... is worth biting the bullet and go with Miller? Welder will be used once a week, maybe. Also how are Hobart wire feeders? I also think that 140 amp welder should be enough for intended use.

  • #2
    Originally posted by rustyboat View Post
    I also think that 140 amp welder should be enough for intended use.
    I would doubt that VERY much...

    Those 120v machines have such limited usefullness.... that he will outgrow it fast and be shopping for a bigger machine in short order..
    .

    *******************************************
    The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

    “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

    Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

    My Blue Stuff:
    Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
    Dynasty 200DX
    Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
    Millermatic 200

    TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

    Comment


    • #3
      H80N is right on. The 120v machines are for sale used all the time because people think they will be enough, and many people find they're not. MIG welds can look very nice but have very little strength due to lack of enough power in the small machines to penetrate the joint deeply enough. I know of only one happy owner long-term; most find them inadequate very soon as they learn and expand in welding. Ok if you will always be limited to sheet metal.

      Comment


      • #4
        Neither of really answered your question. For light use I would think either brand would be fine.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
          Neither of really answered your question. For light use I would think either brand would be fine.
          I agree... but here is a thought.......

          If he enjoys welding ... he will very quickly find many more things that can be built or repaired with a welder....

          Rather than buying a machine that he will soon grow out of....

          why not invest a bit more in a machine for the long term like the MM211 inverter...??.....

          It's BOTH 120 & 240 VAC capable

          https://www.millerwelds.com/equipmen...021572-no-name

          Last edited by H80N; 05-02-2016, 12:11 PM.
          .

          *******************************************
          The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

          “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

          Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

          My Blue Stuff:
          Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
          Dynasty 200DX
          Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
          Millermatic 200

          TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

          Comment


          • #6
            Always a struggle with the purchase of a first welding machine

            As mentioned 120v machines are just limited- not really bad but they are what they are.

            Ed Conley
            http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
            MM252
            MM211
            Passport Plus w/Spool Gun
            TA185
            Miller 125c Plasma 120v
            O/A set
            SO 2020 Bender
            You can call me Bacchus

            Comment


            • #7
              I have lots of machines. One of them is a 120v mig. It has a place. There would be no way I would recommend that someone have one as their ONLY machine. Once you get a welder, you will inevitably have more friends than you remember and they all need something welded back together. And one of those friends will have some sort of trailer frame in need of repair and being a good "friend" you'll give it a try. Now your new/old buddy is dragging a very dangerously repaired trailer around....and on and on. <br />
              <br />
              My point is, a 240v machine will weld everything that 120v machine will weld, do it better, with less effort and you'll be able to do way more other stuff with it than a small 120v machine. <br />
              <br />
              In addition, my opinion is to steer clear of the big box retailer models. They're just not the same quality of machine. <br />
              <br />
              But either a Hobart, Miller or other name brand machine will most likely be fine. Get one that your LWS carries parts for so you can get new contact tips at 3:30 in the afternoon on a Friday when you have to have the job done so you can run your car down the track at 8 tomorrow morning. You get my points I'm sure.

              Comment


              • #8
                True but for light autobody, any small mig will be fine. I see virtually everything when I repair stuff in a Autobody shop. The Miller 135's are prevalent, as are every no name brand of 120 Vac migs. Another option would be a 230 Vac Miller Regency and 30' of reach with a spoolgun can also be used for everything, and they too are popular

                Comment


                • #9
                  My opinion. In that size machine no need to spend the extra money for a Miller. The Hobart machine will do him fine. They are a quality unit & can be purchased cheaper sometimes with store coupons such as at Tractor Supply which usually runs a 10% off every few months. As you have already found out they both have very good feedback from owners. Just don't let him buy a no name brand.

                  If he will stick to only sheetmetal up to 1/8" a 120v machine will be fine. But that is the limit. If he anticipates anything thicker such as small trailer repairs, suspension brackets, etc. then he needs to go to a 240v machine.
                  Last edited by MMW; 05-02-2016, 03:09 PM.
                  MM250
                  Trailblazer 250g
                  22a feeder
                  Lincoln ac/dc 225
                  Victor O/A
                  MM200 black face
                  Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
                  Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
                  Arco roto-phase model M
                  Vectrax 7x12 band saw
                  Miller spectrum 875
                  30a spoolgun w/wc-24
                  Syncrowave 250
                  RCCS-14

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by H80N View Post

                    I would doubt that VERY much...

                    Those 120v machines have such limited usefullness.... that he will outgrow it fast and be shopping for a bigger machine in short order..
                    I agree! I would go with the MM211. He won't outgrow it soon if he is a hobby welder. If his budget puts him in the 110 class of welders, I would go with the Miller. Just my personal preference-but, I don't like welders with tap settings. Just my preference. That's why I prefer a Thunderbolt over a Tombstone. Hope this helps.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
                      Neither of really answered your question. For light use I would think either brand would be fine.
                      which one do you suggest then? I would like to know about this.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        In my mind it becomes a matter of price and personal preference. Both Hobart and Miller are good machines. I would agree with 'Stang (see above in this thread) that I have a personal preference for continuously variable voltage control (Miller) over stepped voltage (Hobart). However, that said I have both a MM211 (which I would HIGHLY recommend as a first welder-a hobbyist may never outgrow it) and an antique MM200. While they are very different classes of machines, they have provided me with the opportunity to use both continuous voltage control (211) and stepped (200). Despite the preference for continuous control for fine adjustment, I have to say I have welded a lot of 16 ga tubing with the stepped control MM200 and have no issue with heat/penetration control. Does that carry over to the smaller stepped machines? I don't have one to compare, but I know people who use the stepped machines on light material and are quite happy with them. My personal thoughts-save your pennies for a MM211. If you can't afford that, and must buy a 120v machine (not recommended), I would go for the Miller 141 (variable) then, for even less money, the Hobart. However, if you must go to the lower cost Hobart, I don't think you should feel you are buying a "bad" machine quality-wise. It is a good machine. Just my two cents worth. Others may have different opinions. (Just a side comment-I bought my MM200 cheap with the idea of cleaning it up and selling for profit. Once I welded with it, I'll probably never sell it until I can't weld any more-it is just a wonderful machine-so smooth with a nice steady somewhat soft arc. A true top quality classic.)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by samuel joff View Post

                          which one do you suggest then? I would like to know about this.
                          Tweco 141i: $585.00
                          Tweco 211i : $912.00 Dual Voltage

                          Hobart 140: $585.00
                          Hobart 210MVP: $897.00 Dual Voltage

                          Miller 141i: $755.00
                          Miller 211i: $1,099.00 Dual Voltage

                          http://store.cyberweld.com


                          If I was staying with a 120v only machine I'd go with the Tweco 141i.
                          Ed Conley
                          http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
                          MM252
                          MM211
                          Passport Plus w/Spool Gun
                          TA185
                          Miller 125c Plasma 120v
                          O/A set
                          SO 2020 Bender
                          You can call me Bacchus

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Isn't the Tweco CHINESE Made.....???

                            I would stay with MILLER or HOBART... BOTH U.S. Made
                            .

                            *******************************************
                            The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                            “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                            Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                            My Blue Stuff:
                            Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                            Dynasty 200DX
                            Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                            Millermatic 200

                            TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I don't know where any of those machines are made. I have an auto arc 180, which is just a related Hobart and it's about a decade old...made in USA. I have a 120v Lincoln 140C I got from my LWS...hecho en Mexico.

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