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Old Dialarc question

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  • Indiana John
    replied
    I decided to post a couple of pics of just what I'm dealing with on this old machine. You can see how the positive socket mounting hole got wallowed out from the loose socket arcing to the panel. If you look closely, you can see how the negative socket has been threaded for the bolt "lug" shown in the other pic. You can also see what is left of the positive socket with the plug now effectively welded into place.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    It's always cool to have old stuff running like new again.

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  • Indiana John
    replied
    Just thought I would post a follow-up. I did find the OE Miller connectors, but I decided to go with the Dinse connectors instead. Just seemed like a better system. So I went to fleabay and found a seller who had some stout looking plugs for a very reasonable price, and another who had the matching sockets and ordered two of each. I made sure to get the ones rated up to 300 amps. After receiving them and seeing how securely they mate together, I feel I made the right choice. Nice heavy chunks of brass, that should have no problem handling the current. made in China of course, but what isn't these days. I'm only doing the DC sockets right now, as I have my old Lincoln tombstone for AC duty.. Thanks to everyone here for your help and good info.

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  • USMCPOP
    replied
    Search "miller receptacle jack plug". Part numbers should be:

    black 039801

    red 039800

    yellow 057608

    But replacing with DINSE is a good idea.

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  • Can You Weld This For Me?
    replied
    Just google "Miller jack plug". You'll find exactly what you're looking for.

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  • Indiana John
    replied
    I did get a copy of the manual. Looks like my welder is from 74 or thereabouts from the date on the manual, it appears mine should use what looks like long tapered pins like the old Forney welders used. Unless I'm looking at it wrong, they don't appear to be a cam-lock style. Yes, I'm looking more for dependability and practicality than originality. The welder is in too poor of physical condition to worry about originality The Dinse style just seem to offer a more secure and reliable connection than those tapered pins.

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  • ccawgc
    replied
    the miller cam lock plugs are available from miller. Just have to order them. They are a little larger then the tweco #2 connectors.
    Will last longer the the dinze connector.

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Indiana John View Post
    I acquired an old Dialarc 250 (non HF unfortunately) a few years ago. I'm just now getting around to getting it up and going. It's led a rough life, and I need to do something about the lead sockets on the front of the machine. A couple of the sockets appear to have been tapped for bolts(!), and another is so loose it has arced to the front panel around the hole in the panel! So, I'm wondering about replacing the sockets. The original sockets for these units don't seem to be commonly available (I can find the plugs), however the Dinse style connectors do, and seem to be a better design. Should I keep trying to find the original style parts? Or should I just switch over the Dinse style connectors? If any of you have ran into this issue, what did you do?
    Thanks!
    Plug in your serial number here to get your manual

    https://www.millerwelds.com/support/manuals-and-parts

    and look here for your parts..

    http://miller4less.com/

    Leave a comment:


  • buffumjr
    replied
    Oooh! Old machines! It depends on what you want to do. If you want to keep it as a period piece, go all original. That way, everytime you find a period cable or handle, it will work. If you bought it to do work for you, and eventually to be sold to someone like you, then go Dinse. Go Dinse for both poles. Expands your options. Lets you use a wider range of more available accessories. Nothing magical. Just electrical connectors.

    Leave a comment:


  • Indiana John
    started a topic Old Dialarc question

    Old Dialarc question

    I acquired an old Dialarc 250 (non HF unfortunately) a few years ago. I'm just now getting around to getting it up and going. It's led a rough life, and I need to do something about the lead sockets on the front of the machine. A couple of the sockets appear to have been tapped for bolts(!), and another is so loose it has arced to the front panel around the hole in the panel! So, I'm wondering about replacing the sockets. The original sockets for these units don't seem to be commonly available (I can find the plugs), however the Dinse style connectors do, and seem to be a better design. Should I keep trying to find the original style parts? Or should I just switch over the Dinse style connectors? If any of you have ran into this issue, what did you do?
    Thanks!
    Last edited by Indiana John; 04-12-2016, 08:59 PM.
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