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MM211 welding steel with 100% CO2

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  • MM211 welding steel with 100% CO2

    Has anyone used a newer inverter 211 with 100% C02? I have read the the older passport did real well with only CO2, maybe the 211 does too. Does the 211 change other electrical parameters when metal/gas knob is switched other than changing the voltage and wire feed rate used for Auto-Set.

    For GMAW mild steel how much worst is the splatter with only CO2? I'm a rookie at this, only having laid crappy beads using a HF Mig 151 clone. I'm thinking of getting a 211 to improve the machine part. Would welding with only C02 be much harder to do with the skills not transferable to Ar/CO2 welding? Is trying to improve welding skills with CO2 dumb, since learning with Ar/CO2 is much easier?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Interesting approch, however, gas, and consumables are kinda expensive to use up in doomed attempts. I would read the equipment manual on proper set up, self educat with questions on proper setup and tips, and practice, practice, practice.

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    • #3
      CO2 should work just fine for steel.... albeit with a bit more spatter....

      you will have to adjust your voltage and wire speed... the values will differ a bit from C25....

      Here is a video that you might find interesting

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56DW...&nohtml5=False

      lots of other info here

      https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...&nohtml5=False

      Straight CO2 is quite common in many applications
      .

      *******************************************
      The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

      “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

      Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

      My Blue Stuff:
      Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
      Dynasty 200DX
      Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
      Millermatic 200

      TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

      Comment


      • #4
        A " Bit More " Spatter , Try a " Lot More " Spatter, In the 1960's & early 70's that's all we ran was straight Co2 were I worked.
        We had to wear a leather sleeve on the left arm , if you wanted to have a shirt sleeve at the end of your shift.......lol.


        Norm
        Last edited by nfinch86; 04-13-2016, 09:13 AM.
        www.normsmobilewelding.blogspot.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by nfinch86 View Post
          A " Bit More " Spatter , Try a " Lot More " Spatter, In the 1960's & early 70's that's all we ran was straight Co2 were I worked.
          We had to wear a leather sleeve on the left arm , if you wanted to have a sleeve at the end of your shift.......lol.


          Norm
          with a bit of fine tuning you can reduce the spatter by a whole bunch... modern machines have a LOT more adjustability than the power supplies of the past....

          Good joint prep is a factor too..

          Here is a thread/discussion on the subject

          http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtal...p/t-18048.html
          Last edited by H80N; 04-13-2016, 09:41 AM.
          .

          *******************************************
          The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

          “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

          Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

          My Blue Stuff:
          Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
          Dynasty 200DX
          Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
          Millermatic 200

          TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by H80N View Post
            CO2 should work just fine for steel.... albeit with a bit more spatter....

            you will have to adjust your voltage and wire speed... the values will differ a bit from C25....

            Here is a video that you might find interesting

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56DW...&nohtml5=False

            lots of other info here

            https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...&nohtml5=False

            Straight CO2 is quite common in many applications

            Thanks those videos are great.

            Comment


            • #7
              I've always used CO2 with my Miller 252 in my home shop. While under certain circumstances, there is a bit more spatter, it can be controlled easily by keeping the torch tip scrupulously clean and dipping it into a jar of weld gel from time to time while it is warm during your work. It works for me and best of all, CO2 is very cheap. I can swap a 20# cylinder for $25 out the door at my LWS. At approximately 8 cu. ft. of gas per pound, that's equivalent to a 160 cu. ft. cylinder of AR/CO2 75/25, which costs considerably more.

              I can understand a commercial fab shop using the mix gas, but for economical home use, it's great.
              Miller Syncrowave 200
              Milermatic 252
              Lincoln AC/DC "Tombstone"

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              • #8
                Once in a galaxy far far away I knew a guy who was swapped a cylinder of co2 instead of c25 by the LWS who ran the route. This guy used the whole cylinder so the LWS swapped him another cylinder and like 6 more cylinders. One day the LWS put a new guy on the route. While swapping cylinders (big ones) he asked this guy if he wanted to try some c25; said it had less spatter. You should've seen the look on this guy's face when he realized he had been using co2 for "a good while". He had made some pretty good looking welds and completed several jobs with good ol' co2, but after a quick chuckle he was sure glad to have his c25 back.

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                • #9
                  C25 is the only gas I don't keep a spare cylinder of on hand. That's because I have two CO2 cylinders for my home brew setup. If I run out of C25 on a job, I'll grab one of my CO2 cylinders and use it to get me through until I get my C25 swapped out. But don't worry, I never actually run OUT of CO2 in the beer fridge. That would be catastrophic. <br />
                  <br />
                  You'll need an adapter for your CO2 cylinder though. They're cheap enough.

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