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Time for new career???

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  • Michael ray
    replied
    I have a few options, my cousin was the welding instructor at the local community college and has tons of contacts and has a couple of companies that are looking for someone. I have talked to one of them myself and I have lots to consider. I did finally calm down and seems like today went pretty well. I really have it made where I'm at except for the occasional customer wondering into the shop. Were out of the city and most people we deal with are repeat customers that we know pretty good so with an environment like that customers just happen sometimes. I really think I need a good vacation, might chance it and take the willys to the beach for a long weekend pretty soon.

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  • old jupiter
    replied
    To your original question, a friend with a one-man auto repair biz got tired of it and took a job with the city doing maintenance in one of the motor pools. Regular hours, 40 a week, doesn't work too hard, decent pay that comes on time every time, great benefits, no dealing with customers, if you need something to do a job they get it for you, . . . .

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  • Michael ray
    replied
    Bad thing is I have a pressure bleeder already. It was a volume problem I guess. The garden sprayer holds a couple gallons easy. The one off the tool truck about a quart. Garden sprayer cost about 35 for everything...I paid 189 for the real deal

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  • Michael ray
    replied
    Brakes solved..took 15 minutes. No help needed for pumping pedal. Garden sprayer, 1/4 inch npt 1-15 psi gauge. Cut hose wand off. Used a spare Mc cap and pumped pressurized fluid through the system. Closed bleeder and had pedal....now I'm mad at myself for not braining up a little sooner. Good to be off that though

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  • Michael ray
    replied
    Your right about needing a vacation, I get enough challenges to keep that dept satisfied

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  • Michael ray
    replied
    No on the chevy brakes, I do have a new plan. Making a pressurized container to force feed fluid in the mc. Only going for 10-12 psi. We'll see. As for the customer cars.. one was that chevy and the other im waiting on the person to bring me parts. I can't work in the shop if we are waiting on parts and I just couldn't do that chevy after all the aggravation last week. I wasn't hateful to any, just need a break. That chevy was his fault for letting it go that long. The inner pad was mia, nowhere to be found. The caliper pistons were grinding into what was left of the rotor.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Well did you ever get those Chevy brakes bled successfully? I had a problem on an old fairlane wagon we were building that was similar to that. I finally broke down and called the manufactorer of the master cylinder and ask for help. In about ten seconds they solved all of my problems. I was glad to have the solution but I was also irritated because it was my initial thought but I figured that it can't possibly be that. <br />
    <br />
    Anyway, I've been thinking about your original post for a few days now. It sounds like you have your game together with the auto tech stuff. Ya know, there's an ebb and a flow to everything. Maybe you're just in the middle of an ebb tide for some reason. I think we've all had that and it's almost never a good idea to make a life changing decision when you're disgruntled. But you're still young enough that there's all sorts of options open to you besides auto tech or welding. I'd also say that shoving your customers off because you're in a bad mood isn't the right decision, which I'm sure you'll agree with. Sometimes we get like that though. Maybe what you need is a challenge, a vacation or both to clear your head a bit.

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  • Michael ray
    replied

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  • Michael ray
    replied
    I believe a man that's willing to get up and go to work can find something to do...I've changed paths in the past and don't really have any regrets... I did push 2 customer cars out of my way today and put the top end back together on the willys jeep. One of the customers came by, he didn't get the answer he was looking for but that's just how its gonna be till I decide. Did feel good to push those turds outa the shop and do something of my own.

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  • gnforge
    replied
    Worked in auto truck world for many years. Managed both mechanic & autobody for many years. Been self employed for 10 years now. Metal is in my DNA so what I do now is by far what I love most. Being self employed is tough to say the least but as for me I've been to far in life to work for business or production line all day long. I gross more and net less than any other work but that comes with territory, also clients don't always pay on time so that's a common. I work 10 hrs a day and many times 6 days a week but as they say I'm my own boss, ouch, but really my debt & payments are my boss. And in this world you never know if you have work next week Defiantly not for everyone not even for most. And in our small town there is now 4 self employed welders due to gas oil & coal bottom falling out. It's bad in our valley and most of these welders are doing other jobs to make ends meet. <br />
    As for certified welders. It means nothing in our area. If you want a job the Co. will test you. You pass they hire you you fail you keep walking. <br />
    All in all I love my work and I've been blessed greatly cause I've always had work. Never a day so far I haven't had a job. I guess that's good because I cant afford to retire at this job and I'll be working a long time. But I have the freedom of being self employed I can still chose what & when I work. <br />
    If you ever make the jump, plan long and hard. Line up work and good company's ahead of time. Work for them in spare time or start part time. I worked two jobs. Or plan on eating roman noodles or starving. It's a hard road to travel. As it is with most good things in life<br />
    Greg

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  • MMW
    replied
    Judging by the "tone" of your writing you are just fed up with your current situation. Not a good time to make life changing decisions. You need to look at things like this without emotion & come up with a plan, whether it be welding or something else. I've seen too many people make knee jerk decisions & regret it.

    As was said earlier only you can make this decision. When you do decide hopefully you have thought it through & are looking at the big picture & not just a month down the road.
    Last edited by MMW; 04-09-2016, 10:26 AM.

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  • Michael ray
    replied
    And as for free time, last thing I want to do is turn wrenches when I do it 5 or 6 days a week for everybody else. I'd probably hate welding after some time but if I weld all day I might feel more like using free time for the stuff I used to like. I used to love playing with hot rods and fast cars till I started working on cars everyday. And where we are is pitiful, seems like everyone runs one till it's completely fubared, then complain how they can't afford to fix or they always ask wants the cheapest thing you can do to get me going..new answer is take it to the dealer and pay dealer prices. We charge 50-60 hour, local dealers and shops inside Chattanooga are averaging 80-120 hr. I'm not the best around by far but I think I can do better.. we get all the bmw,mercedes,vw,audi,mini, all the weird bs from 2 other shops also, they send them to us for 60 an hour. I'm sure they are adding 25-30 percent and issuing their own work order...maybe I need a few days off

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  • Michael ray
    replied
    I have worked for myself in the past, looking back i miss those days. I work at a small local shop in the woods of North Georgia. I get paid commission. %50 straight up. I know that's unheard of but when you have weeks where the shop sweeper makes what I do because of delayed parts and customers not having the money when the jobs done, kinda makes me think shove it. I spend at least 100 a week just in fuel, 70 plus miles a day in a 12 mpg truck. Spend at least 100 a week on snap on truck then I supply 95% of the welders and consumables. The shop has a millermatic 135, I have 6 machines there... we do lots of trailer and truck repair and I am the only 1 that does that on top of all the day to day stuff that comes in. I'm going in today with a different attitude. From today on they are paying my price for any work, if that's not good I'll go rent a u haul and start loading. I know grass isn't greener on the other side but it might not be dying anyway. We have so much work there it's unreal, I can't even move vehicles in the parking lot it's so packed but people and parts and no money takes its toll. And the 45 minute drive gives me plenty of time to think and thats not good.

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  • Meltedmetal
    replied
    It's a decision only you can make. I always thought learning the new stuff (like in automotive tech) was what kept it interesting. Do you work for yourself or for an employer? Self employment can look a lot better than it really is unless you are cut out for that. Sometimes the grass only looks greener on the other side of the fence. It sounds to me like you are getting restless. From a financial stand point you're current automotive skills should demand decent money in the right place. Free time to work on your projects is mostly about time management and as MMW says self-employment often doesn't give you more time rather it gives you less.
    As for GM they need a serious talking to in the corner away from prying eyes, if you get my drift.

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  • MMW
    replied
    Reading your posts you seem to have yourself talked into it. You complain about the free time you don't have as you can't finish your jeep. Another career is probably not going to fix that. Most welders I know who work for someone do side jobs to make extra money so that tells you something right there. You can always work for yourself but you will most likely work 6-7 days a week that way. I would advise to steer clear of a welding career unless you have a clear path laid out for you with a great job waiting. I've been doing it for a living for 30 years & can't wait to retire from it. It is mostly a very physical job & it takes its toll on the body.

    Entry level welders don't make decent money at least where I am. Even experienced welders don't make much around here. It's a different world than it used to be. My suggestion is to look long & hard before changing careers again.

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