Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

tungsten stability ac tig aluminum problems

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Olivero
    replied
    You could aso try E3's those electrodes are pretty awesome for anything you throw at them, I have had one split on me at 200 Amps while running beads on 3/8" aluminum plate when I was building a heavy duty ramp but it still took a while, also split 2 cups while doing it so I am not so surprised it eventually split, but those were 3/32" E3's. They can be used on both steel, stainless, brass, copper, etc. and aluminum. I just take one or 2 and dedicate them for aluminum with a balled tip and leave the rest nice and sharp for anything else. Check em out online, they work great, about the same price as thoriated.

    Leave a comment:


  • xryan
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    I've been working hard to use up my red tungsten so I only have one color left in the drawer. I'm blue all the way as well.


    The only "red" in my machine is tungsten

    I guess I should kick the habit and get rid of the last red and keep blue tungsten in the blue welder...

    Leave a comment:


  • Andrew J 649
    replied
    I hear that ryanjones2150. I really like the idea of one for all and the Diamond Ground products 2% Lanth (blue) that i got two weeks ago have been working better than anything i had previously. Unfortunately, i think for what I'm currently doing (lots of 1/4" 5052), the "tri-mix" is even better. They sent me a sample 1/8" along with my order of lanth, and i think its really good. Seems to make a nice even ball that stays even and round as i go. This is all at 200-220 amps, straight argon, 6.5 ac balance.
    https://www.diamondground.com/tri-mix-ivory/
    Last edited by Andrew J 649; 04-23-2016, 02:04 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I've been working hard to use up my red tungsten so I only have one color left in the drawer. I'm blue all the way as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by niftyweld View Post
    I recently purchase these blue 2% lanthanated tungsten electrodes. I've also was able to get my hands on 1.5%. I think it's better to get a larger one.so far these guys says that larger tungsten seems to hold up better, or at least that's been their experience, but I'm still learning. Just buy more tungsten to test the theory. I'll provide a where I purchase my tungsten, they seem to get the order quick with a reasonable price. If any problems, call customer service, they can help out anything and suggestions.

    1/16
    https://www.weldingcity.com/tig-tung...-1.6mm-x7.html
    3/32
    https://www.weldingcity.com/tig-tung...-2.4mm-x7.html
    I have gone to BLUE 2% Lanth for AC/DC all round use..... did that when I upgraded from Transformer/Chopper ... to DYNASTY advanced inverters
    ...several years ago

    Leave a comment:


  • niftyweld
    replied
    I recently purchase these blue 2% lanthanated tungsten electrodes. I've also was able to get my hands on 1.5%. I think it's better to get a larger one.so far these guys says that larger tungsten seems to hold up better, or at least that's been their experience, but I'm still learning. Just buy more tungsten to test the theory. I'll provide a where I purchase my tungsten, they seem to get the order quick with a reasonable price. If any problems, call customer service, they can help out anything and suggestions.

    1/16
    https://www.weldingcity.com/tig-tung...-1.6mm-x7.html
    3/32
    https://www.weldingcity.com/tig-tung...-2.4mm-x7.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Unibit
    replied
    I have to say, this tread is full of great advice. I was having a similar issue with a 280DX yet after trying some of the ideas shared here, problem solved. Thank you gentleman!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bruce83
    replied
    I like Gray or Gold, Green (pure) gives too big a ball and Red (2%) tends to spit (but I like it on DC) and form 2 balls. I run my Ac balance a 8 or 9 as it gives a smaller ball, deeper penetration and smaller focused arc.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    One thing to consider...

    there have been a lot of problems with cheap chinese consumables like collets & collet bodies bought off of fleabay

    poor machining.. improper deburring have caused many cases of inadequate or uneven shield gas flow... this is a case where name brands can make a big quality difference

    have even seen a couple of cases where "Bargain" torch back caps leaked and caused gas contamination..

    Leave a comment:


  • Andrew J 649
    replied
    No i hadn't looked at that H80N, thanks for the link. Looking forward to trying these when they show up.

    I know those will take a few days to get here so i thought i'd try a 1/8" ceriated and a 5/32" 1.5% lanth from mcmaster carr in the mean time. When you order (singles anyway) from them, they come as Blue Demon brand. Any opinions on these?

    One thing i'd say is that if the shielding is right, that big 5/32" holds up really well. So, thanks for that tip from MMW on 3/3/16. I had to start up the 180SD to run the air cooled #17 torch (as i don't have the right dinse connections to run the #17 on the 250 sync) but it did really well. Had it in a straight standard collet and had no problems on 1/4" 6061 aside from the torch getting hot as hades. Had it maxed out, pedal down full. Images attached.

    When testing out the ceriated something Interesting happened that brings things back to the discoloration/shielding issue that i was totally not aware of until griff01 mentioned it also on 3/3/16. Ive had my eyes open tungsten color since.. so when i had some problems today i saw it. Running the #20 water cooled torch w this ceriated in a stubby gas lens i experienced big problems right off the bat. Looked at the tungsten and saw a blue streak running down one side. Swapped out the stubby lens for a standard collet body and it was fine. Tungsten stayed silver, bead ran ok (as far as I'm concerned, but obviously not tops). The ceriated itself clearly isn't the problem here, just a leak of some sort in the torch set up (i think around the gasket). A month ago i never would have been able to sort this out.

    Thanks for everyones continued input.
    Last edited by Andrew J 649; 03-24-2016, 09:30 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    If you have not already done so...

    Here is the link to download the DG Tungsten Guidebook..

    http://www.diamondground.com/TungstenGuidebook2013.pdf

    Lots of good info there...

    Leave a comment:


  • Andrew J 649
    replied
    Thanks guys.
    Griff, you are right, i stupidly had that backwards and am seeing a bit of improvement at 7, Thanks. As for the tungsten size MMW, i'm using both 3/32 and 1/8. 3/32 because i have it in 2% lanth, whereas my 1/8" is only 1.5%. Just going back and forth to cover the bases in case that makes a difference. I spoke to Dave at Miller today and he recommended i look into tungsten from Diamond Ground Products. He speculated that there's some bad quality tungstens out there, and that could be part of my problem. Called them up and ordered some 1/8th in 2% (wolfram brand). Not for nothing but what is thought about the tig welding calculator? here-
    https://www.millerwelds.com/resource...ing-calculator
    Load in aluminum on the material and "1/4" inside corner" and it comes up 3/32" tungsten at 140-170 amps.
    H80N, I'm sure you are right. and thanks. I'd also bet that you and most of the others on this forum do amazing work, which is why I'm here.

    Leave a comment:


  • griff01
    replied
    Originally posted by Andrew J 649 View Post
    Thanks ryanjones2150. I have varied my AC balance to get the best results between "3" and "8". I was under the impression that towards max penetration (or higher numbers on the dial) is harder on the tungsten, so i guess i mostly have been leaning towards greater cleaning (lower numbers on the dial)... as its tungsten stability/survival that I'm after. I was just looking at the manual which says that "3" is balanced 50/50. Would you recommend this?
    As for frequency, i believe my only choices are HF start or HF continuous. Im using HF continuous. Or is there another frequency setting you are referring to. This particular machine doesn't have any of the optional controls that come standard with the 350 LX (which shares the same manual). Attached is a picture of the righthand side controls, or non-controls.

    Thanks FusionKing. There is a lot of advise in there. Some of it on the topic of tungsten control etc., a lot of it on aluminum welding in general, and more on, i guess what i'd call general practices. All good advice I'm sure. I'm trying to keep my questions to areas that i think effect the life of the tungsten in the aluminum welding process, but i do realize that you can't isolate one issue, as all of the many parts play into the whole. Type of tungsten, gas coverage, ac balance, material condition/cleanliness, arc length, stick out... the list goes on and on. Clearly I'm a novice compared to many contributors here, but i don't think you need to be a seasoned pro to understand how to keep your tungsten from jumping off into the puddle. Admittedy 100% of my experience has been with mild steel, which I've been welding (and machining) for many years. In those years, and on that material, the rules have been comparatively simple - keep the tungsten sharp, clean, and shielded. I'm just trying to get at the info that I'm lacking in this area. If that puts me in the novice camp, well, then i guess i'll just be getting talked down to by some, but clearly not by all.
    Put your balance on 7 and forget it until you get better and can actually see difference. The graph is actually color coded: gray for stick and green for TIG. The HF continuous is correct for aluminum. I have the Syncro 350 and don't use the pulser or sequencer on aluminum.
    I believe you have your thinking reversed on the balance in reference to being hard on the tungsten.

    Griff

    Leave a comment:


  • MMW
    replied
    I just went back & re-read some of this. I now realize you are back to using a 3/32" tungsten.. Why? Aluminum requires high heat, a lot of amps so you need to step up in size to 1/8 minimum. If you are going to weld thicker stuff which it seems that you are then use 1/8 or 5/32. Not trying to be jerky here but you have been told a few times to use a bigger tungsten & you are still trying to use 3/32 on thick aluminum.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Andrew J 649 View Post

    Thanks FusionKing. There is a lot of advise in there. Some of it on the topic of tungsten control etc., a lot of it on aluminum welding in general, and more on, i guess what i'd call general practices. All good advice I'm sure. I'm trying to keep my questions to areas that i think effect the life of the tungsten in the aluminum welding process, but i do realize that you can't isolate one issue, as all of the many parts play into the whole. Type of tungsten, gas coverage, ac balance, material condition/cleanliness, arc length, stick out... the list goes on and on. Clearly I'm a novice compared to many contributors here, but i don't think you need to be a seasoned pro to understand how to keep your tungsten from jumping off into the puddle. Admittedy 100% of my experience has been with mild steel, which I've been welding (and machining) for many years. In those years, and on that material, the rules have been comparatively simple - keep the tungsten sharp, clean, and shielded. I'm just trying to get at the info that I'm lacking in this area. If that puts me in the novice camp, well, then i guess i'll just be getting talked down to by some, but clearly not by all.

    FusionKing may have sounded a little abrupt... but his advice is excellent and intentions good... do not believe he was talking down....

    just trying to give the best advice in the most compact form

    He does superb aluminum work.... well worth trying to emulate.... take look at some of his work from his FB page....

    https://www.facebook.com/OutBackAlum...=page_internal

    It speaks volumes

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X