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anybody know where to get cheap fire-proof coveralls ?

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  • anybody know where to get cheap fire-proof coveralls ?

    Don't laugh.

    I have a habit, which I don't even want to change, of letting my TIG torch hang free from around my shoulders when I finish a weld. This means the still red-hot electrode sometimes burns a hole in my polyester coveralls.

    I am tired of patching these holes. But when I look around at what kind of coveralls are available, the really fire proof ones (Nomex) are way over $100. I am not happy about paying this much, especially when I haven't had any experience with nomex and don't really know if even that will stand up to a red-hot electrode.

    I know there are all kinds of leather jackets and aprons out there, but I want a one-piece coverall that won't be hot in the summer and won't get in the way when I am squirming under cars etc.

    Anybody have experience with Nomex or know of something else that won't cost a lot ?

  • #2
    Well, one suggestion, if you know someone who is good at sewing, maybe find a 2x2' piece (or smaller, whatever would cover the area that you regularly burn) and have them sew it on to the front of your coveralls, and see if it works or not. If so, either go with that and replace it as necessary, or go with Nomex knowing that it will stand up to the abuse, at least the heat abuse, no idea if it wears well or not.

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    • #3
      alha,

      I have had the same thought, and I may try something like you suggest eventually. My wife knows how to work a sewing machine, and we actually have one, but getting her to sit down at it is another story...

      It sounds like you have some experience with nomex. Do you know for certain that it will resist, say, a red hot electrode ?

      Comment


      • #4
        Nomex and the variations of it will burn. I have been wearing it for more than 15 years at work. Just had a brand new pair of Nomex work pants catch a piece of hot slag that I just chipped and now I have a nice hole. Nomex is kinda misleading as being "fireproof" It isn't. It was designed for oil workers to maybe have a 2nd chance and make it to safety in case of a vapor explosion with minimal damage to the person. I have wore out countless shirt tails from beveling pipe with a grinder as the sparks just eat it up. The only true fireproof is the old asbestos clothes and they can't be had now. Just my thoughts...Bob
        Bob Wright

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        • #5
          Don't make it a dichotomy. Just get cotton/wool. You don't need "fireproof." You just need something that doesn't melt at the first sign of something hot.

          For that matter, you shouldn't be wearing any polyester in an environment with sparks and flames anyway.

          Comment


          • #6
            MAC702 - my coveralls are actually cotten/polyester, but they seem to have enough polyester to be pretty fragile around heat.

            Bob - I appreciate the comments from actual experience. Looks like Nomex will not really do what I want.


            Seems like there is a real opportunity here - a lot of people working in clothes that aren't quite up to the task. Asbestos is verboten, for sure. There is a "mineral wool" that is commonly used for insulation, but I don't think it makes a very durable cloth. What we really need is some kind of fabric based on nylon, which is cheap and strong, with something ordinary like fiberglass incorporated in the weave and exposed on the top to catch all the sparks. Guess I'll go look for a textiles forum...

            Comment


            • #7
              arc.ranger,

              As suggested by Alha, perhaps a piece of kevlar to protect the burn area would help.

              Did a quick test using a kevlar glove.
              Heated a stainless wire red hot and pressed it on a finger.
              Left a burn mark on the outside but it didn't appear to burn thru to the inside.

              Thicker kevlar fabric is available on ebay.

              Needs to be sewn on but it might work for you.

              http://www.ebay.com/itm/272116116628...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

              http://www.ebay.com/itm/171779882105...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

              http://www.ebay.com/itm/201517784134...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT
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              Miller Dynasty 350, Dynasty 210 DX, Hypertherm 1000, Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, large first aid kit, etc.

              Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

              Comment


              • #8
                I've been a firefighter since early 2001. It is my experience that there is no such thing as "fire proof" clothing. Certainly nothing cheap either. I have burned my bunker gear on a few occasions which renders it out of service. But if you absolutely must have some sort of fire resistant material, the stuff our gear is made out of would be the way to go. Nomex will almost certainly not perform how you're expecting. We actually wear nomex station uniforms, but it was honestly a knee jerk reaction by the department after one of our guys got severely burned in a fire. It is my opinion that a nomex uniform would not have prevented or lessened his burns one bit.

                You can easily find used bunker gear for sale on eBay. Maybe you could get something and cut it up for your use. I can tell you that the material is extremely expensive, which is why I suggest used. I would bet that a textile company that provides that material will not just sell you two square feet of it. When a guy's gear has certain types of damage, the entire garment is generally retired. So there are boat loads of the stuff floating around out there.

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                • #9
                  While not FIREPROOF.... you can treat your COTTON welding wear to RETARD Flame

                  http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...693#post488693
                  .

                  *******************************************
                  The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                  “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                  Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                  My Blue Stuff:
                  Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                  Dynasty 200DX
                  Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                  Millermatic 200

                  TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

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                  • #10
                    General safety precautions are detailed in the ANSI Z49.1. Regarding weld cables, we state the following in all of our welding power source OM’s:
                    EMF Information
                    · Do not drape cables over your body.
                    · Do not place your body between welding cables. Arrange cables to one side and away from the operator.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Awww. Dad!!

                      "Do not drape cables over your body" ... Then how are you supposed to get the considerable weight of the cable, coolant lines, controller wires, etc. off of your torch arm (which has enough work maintaining the electrode height)

                      Lawyers would never get anything welded at all.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by arc.ranger View Post
                        Don't laugh.

                        I have a habit, which I don't even want to change, of letting my TIG torch hang free from around my shoulders when I finish a weld. This means the still red-hot electrode sometimes burns a hole in my polyester coveralls.....
                        Whatever you end up doing.... I would not be wearing POLYESTER or any meltable synthetics near the skin while welding... melted plastic fused to tender skin can be life threatening ... those injuries are not uncommon

                        .

                        *******************************************
                        The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                        “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                        Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                        My Blue Stuff:
                        Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                        Dynasty 200DX
                        Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                        Millermatic 200

                        TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

                        Comment

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