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  • Bob Sigmon
    replied
    You got it! Now you just need to figure out which welder you want!!!!

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  • Arcburn
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob Sigmon
    IF you want to keep the original plug on the welder, buy a female that matches the welder plug, a male that matches the dryer wall outlet and attach these to the proper gauge wire for the amperage that you need (amperage info is in the owners manual of your welder). You should look at the circuit breaker for the dryer and that will tell you the max amperage that you can run. The guys at the electrical dept will tell you what gauge wire you need. Since you don't have the welder, you can look on line at most owners manuals to see what kind of amperage they draw.
    So basicly, I attach the female that matches the welder plug and wire the male that matches the dryer outlet to it with the proper gauge wire and plug the male into the dryer outlet and it should work right?

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  • Bob Sigmon
    replied
    If you want to change the connector on the welder, you just buy the plug, cut the cable and wire the new plug on. IF you want to keep the original plug on the welder, buy a female that matches the welder plug, a male that matches the dryer wall outlet and attach these to the proper gauge wire for the amperage that you need (amperage info is in the owners manual of your welder). You should look at the circuit breaker for the dryer and that will tell you the max amperage that you can run. The guys at the electrical dept will tell you what gauge wire you need. Since you don't have the welder, you can look on line at most owners manuals to see what kind of amperage they draw.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arcburn
    replied
    Is it kind of like an adapter? Because the dryer is currently useing it and I dont want to change the outlet. If I have to I guess I could change the cord on the welder and my cousion is a electricion so he could do it for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Sigmon
    replied
    Arcburn -

    Just go to the nearest home supply and they will have a plug that will fit your dryer outlet. Either change the plug on the welder or make an extention cord (with a heavy enough ga.) with the proper connector on each end.

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  • Arcburn
    replied
    Yes there is a dryer outlet nearby that I could use...But I never saw that kind of plug on a welder before or is there different types of the same model that have that type of plug.

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  • INTP
    replied
    You'll probably find some wires in the attic of your 1960's house. They don't run them near the access openings, for obvious reasons, but they're probably there. If you want to put in a new circuit, that's the way it would go, depending on your attic of course. A 30A circuit could be run on 10GA wire which is pretty cheap, although if it's a long run I'd go with 8GA.

    As for the welder question, I wouldn't sweat the single pass thing so much (unless there's a requirement you haven't told us about.) If you have a GOOD 120V machine (think HH 140 or MM135, or Lincoln's equivalent), then you can get some pretty good results with beveling or multi-pass. I do agree that it would be worth going to 240V machine, especially if you're doing anything structural, but the 120V machine you have is still better than the 240V machine you wish you could have.

    Leave a comment:


  • millermania
    replied
    Originally posted by hankj
    My guess would be that the single garage outlet is a GFCI, and the kitchen and bath outlets are protected by it downstream. If not, and there is a garage door opener, it's likely that they share the same feed. If you DON'T have either of those two scenarios, then the plan that rb455 laid out could work. If you DO do that, mark the white wires with black tape at both ends to denote that they are no longer neutrals.

    As for the other options: do you have access above all of this to run new wire in the attic space? If so, it's not usually a big deal to drill through the top plate above your service panel, fish a NM cable in, and run a new circuit to the garage. The "conduit around the house" thing is more difficult, but if you can hide it under the eave or below the siding on a raised foundation, it's doable. Got crawl space underneath? That's another option.

    Don't think you'll find JET's solution. Conduit is very seldom used in a residence for branch circuits.

    Let us know...

    Hank
    Thanks for the info. I'll have to dig around and see if any of these is feasible. The house was built in the 1960's. How are wires usually run through a house? Are wires just run all over the place without conduit to protect it?

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  • hankj
    replied
    My guess would be that the single garage outlet is a GFCI, and the kitchen and bath outlets are protected by it downstream. If not, and there is a garage door opener, it's likely that they share the same feed. If you DON'T have either of those two scenarios, then the plan that rb455 laid out could work. If you DO do that, mark the white wires with black tape at both ends to denote that they are no longer neutrals.

    As for the other options: do you have access above all of this to run new wire in the attic space? If so, it's not usually a big deal to drill through the top plate above your service panel, fish a NM cable in, and run a new circuit to the garage. The "conduit around the house" thing is more difficult, but if you can hide it under the eave or below the siding on a raised foundation, it's doable. Got crawl space underneath? That's another option.

    Don't think you'll find JET's solution. Conduit is very seldom used in a residence for branch circuits.

    Let us know...

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • rb455ho
    replied
    If, and only if, the 120 volt line has NOTHING ELSE BRANCHED(PARALLED) with it you can convert it to 240. Simply buy a 2 pole breaker and remove the white neutral from the bus bar and connect it to the other pole of the new breaker. New breaker will have 1 black wire and 1 white wire, leave the ground. More than likely the circuit also feeds the lights and possibly other outlets. Be careful and make certain of the above.

    Leave a comment:


  • JET
    replied
    One option is to hook the new wires for the garage to the old wires, and pull them through. That will fish the new wires through the same routing as the old ones. You will be ok if there aren't any wire nuts or if it is run through conduit.

    Leave a comment:


  • millermania
    replied
    Originally posted by hankj
    Arcburn,
    Now, if you can get to a dryer plug, or we can coach you through a 240V installation for your shop, get the MM210!

    Hank
    Yeah this is the situation I'm in. My breaker panel is located on the other side of the house as the garage. I currently only have one branch of 120V going to the garage and would like to run 240V. What's involved in doing this? I would like to avoid having to run an extension cord from the laundry room, and I think running external conduit is pretty expensive and ugly.

    (getting garage ready for D200DX, hehehe)

    Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    Arcburn,

    If you don't have a dryer outlet accessible to your welding area, and there is NO way to bring a 240V circuit to your work space, don't feel like it's the end of the world because you've been relegated to a "little" machine.

    My first welder was a MM 135, and, with rroper joint preparation and weilding tecnique, is is quite versatile. It's possible to get good weld penetration on .250 stock using a double V-groove joint and multiple passes. The guys on this board (HAWK, pjs, socalita, for a few) coached me through that delimma when I was a "newbie", and it works!

    Now, if you can get to a dryer plug, or we can coach you through a 240V installation for your shop, get the MM210!

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • bigwelder
    replied
    220 better then 115

    i had a 115 volt welder and got rid of it cause it limited me to much, go 220 u can always lower the setting for thinner stuff.

    IMO 220 is the better welder for the money u will spend and the time u save not multi passing

    Leave a comment:


  • storts
    replied
    Power

    Originally posted by Arcburn
    I need some help to decide what MIG welder to buy. First of all I am limited to 115 V power because I will be welding at home, Second I will be welding 1/8 to 1/4 mild steel. I will be primarily useing .030 wire with 25/75 gas.
    ARC, Every home that i ever saw has 240 volt service coming in, most people call it 220,either way its the same,,So why not go with at leaset a 175 or 180 Mig?, Jack

    Leave a comment:

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