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  • Tig Filler Storage

    For those of you who are not on the "Weld Talk" site here are some storage tubes I made for my tig filler. They are made from schedule 40 PVC and cost $3.79 each to make. I plan on hanging them to the side of the cart for my Maxstar, that is if I ever get that cart made.
    Attached Files
    Regards, George

    Hobart Handler 210 w/DP3035 - Great 240V small Mig
    Hobart Handler 140 - Great 120V Mig
    Hobart Handler EZ125 - IMO the best 120V Flux Core only machine

    Miller Dynasty 200DX with cooler of my design, works for me
    Miller Spectrum 375 - Nice Cutter

  • #2
    Good idea, my stuff is still in the original box. Can't ask for a more affordable option.

    Comment


    • #3
      Right on!

      You're right on with the pvc.

      Here's an article I did a year ago for Circle Track Racing that shows a bunch of the same storage technique. I chose to just use the slip on caps instead of threaded ones. Cost is even cheaper and less work. They all slide under my weld bench The caps are labeled with the appropriate size and type and are easy to read.

      Hope these low res scans come through.

      Andy
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • #5
        Last ones

        article continued
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • #6
          Sundown,
          They are real simple to make you are right.. I made a whole rack to carry all sizes of al.tig wire,stainless tig and carbon tig wire. i also attached them to my cart at differnt hights for easy access.
          Great job!


          terence

          Comment


          • #7
            I to used the PVC pipe for filler storage, however I didn't enclose the rods, as a matter of fact being as stingy as I am I cut the side so I could use the short pieces.
            L*S

            http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...S/IM000371.jpg

            Comment


            • #8
              Originally posted by leons2003
              I to used the PVC pipe for filler storage, however I didn't enclose the rods, as a matter of fact being as stingy as I am I cut the side so I could use the short pieces.
              L*S

              http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...S/IM000371.jpg
              I didn't think about putting windows in, great idea.
              Regards, George

              Hobart Handler 210 w/DP3035 - Great 240V small Mig
              Hobart Handler 140 - Great 120V Mig
              Hobart Handler EZ125 - IMO the best 120V Flux Core only machine

              Miller Dynasty 200DX with cooler of my design, works for me
              Miller Spectrum 375 - Nice Cutter

              Comment


              • #9
                I prefered to keep mine enclosed to keep all the cantamination off the rods. You'd be surprised how much stuff gets on them from being exposed.

                A

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by Brass Monkey
                  Isnt it proper to store your rod in a controlled atmosphere?I find the rod I keep in the oven set on a low temp keeps my tig rod better than out in the open.It builds up less hydrogen on the rod.Wich makes for cleaner welments.
                  WOW, that's intense, you have an oven that keeps your filler rod? Just for s#!ts and giggles, what temp. do you store them at? Do you set it to "Bake" or "preheat"? ( last part just for laughs, but temp. question, seriously curious) I can't say that I will ever find that necessary, I'm just a hobbiest though.
                  -SPiNNeR-

                  Hobart 135
                  Oxy-Acet w/ Victor torch
                  Dynasty 200 DX

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Originally posted by ASKANDY
                    I prefered to keep mine enclosed to keep all the cantamination off the rods. You'd be surprised how much stuff gets on them from being exposed.

                    A
                    I hear you, I normally select however many I think I will be needing for a job then clean them with acetone before I start. But being retired like I am, I can take all the time I want.
                    Regards, George

                    Hobart Handler 210 w/DP3035 - Great 240V small Mig
                    Hobart Handler 140 - Great 120V Mig
                    Hobart Handler EZ125 - IMO the best 120V Flux Core only machine

                    Miller Dynasty 200DX with cooler of my design, works for me
                    Miller Spectrum 375 - Nice Cutter

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      I've heard of that before. Rod that is not copper coated will typically produce cleaner welds, the downside is that it has a short shelf life. For a shop that has a large stock of this type of rod around, it only makes sense to protect it in a rod oven.
                      Living in Michigan, I have observed that even the copper coated rods lose their shine after a while. I attribute this to humidity. I would definitely not purchase an amount of filler I can't use in a year. And I would at least store it in a tube with a cap on the end.

                      Sometimes I wipe the copper coated rods with a scotchbrite pad, but I can't tell if it makes a real difference, or if it's just psychological.

                      As for the short pieces, if I'm welding something that's not critical, I will weld the rod to a longer piece to use it all up.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        don't think you need to keep filler in oven. just coated rod to protect it from moisture in the air, or to dry them out after being exposed to moisture or water. though filler just needs to be cleaned by wiping it down.

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