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Welding & Plasma Cutting Over An Epoxy Floor?

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    How about concrete board, a sheet of aluminum, or masonite. Laid on the floor? I built a flame table for the school, it was a verticle slat top with an angled slides and a slide out tray that caught the hot slag and sparks. The table Idea would reduce the damage but not eliminate hot sparks from popping off the top and landing on the floor.

    Hope this helps,

    Leave a comment:


  • Roadster
    replied
    Originally posted by Rocky D
    If you have one of these, you don't have to worry about the floor.

    http://photobucket.com/albums/v252/R...tting%20Grate/

    The bars drop into the slots and can be removed when burnt up. Pan of water under the slot frame soaks up the sparks.
    Rocky, thanks for the additional ideas. I appreciate it.

    Originally posted by pjseaman
    We had an epoxy floor in the old weld shop at school and it was a mess and was really easy to blister. I agree with the fellows, plain concrete is better in a weld shop.
    Unfortunately, that's not an option for me if I want to weld in my garage, since the epoxy is already laid on all 600 sq ft. I couldn't rip it up, even if I wanted to, and it does serve a useful purpose in being very easy to clean for most garage usage. So my options are: (1) don't weld or cut at home, (2) do it over the concrete driveway (which, as noted above, is not problem free either), or find a way to cover the floor or catch the sparks/slag.

    Thanks for the suggestions, guys. I really appreciate the ideas. If you have any additional thoughts, keep 'em coming.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    We had an epoxy floor in the old weld shop at school and it was a mess and was really easy to blister. I agree with the fellows, plain concrete is better in a weld shop.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rocky D
    replied
    If you have one of these, you don't have to worry about the floor.

    http://photobucket.com/albums/v252/R...tting%20Grate/

    The bars drop into the slots and can be removed when burnt up. Pan of water under the slot frame soaks up the sparks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scott V
    replied
    Originally posted by Roadster
    Scott, thank you! I never would have thought of that. That's awesome.

    The only Hardibacker that I can find online is max 1/4" thick...

    http://www.jameshardie.com/backerboa...ardibacker.php

    Did you use a generic product, or did you double up the thickness?

    Edit: Scratch that... Hardibacker 500 is 1/2" thick...

    http://www.jameshardie.com/backerboa...ibacker500.php

    The .250 should work just as well, if you keep it under about 1000 amps output!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Roadster
    replied
    Originally posted by lramberson
    My formal recommendation- if it is possible to have a dedicated cutting area with raw concrete. The finish, applied,epoxy, concrete seal, or painted will deteriorate quickly if you oa cut (the slag will get you) or plasma arc. I have been told the plasm arc is still molten at 30" on the bigger units Just go with a floor protector as recommended by Scott or have a nice cutting area designated. I made the mistake of doing a plasma cut in the drive and it is like a tatoo of my work and will be there for a long haul (pissed wife ) so think ahead. I never would have thought the plasma arc with 18" clearance would leave a permanant mark in Pave Stones.. Learn from my mistake and cover your assets from damage.
    Laurence
    Thanks, Lawrence. I appreciate your advice. I'd much rather learn from your mistake than mine on something like this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    My formal recommendation- if it is possible to have a dedicated cutting area with raw concrete. The finish, applied,epoxy, concrete seal, or painted will deteriorate quickly if you oa cut (the slag will get you) or plasma arc. I have been told the plasm arc is still molten at 30" on the bigger units Just go with a floor protector as recommended by Scott or have a nice cutting area designated. I made the mistake of doing a plasma cut in the drive and it is like a tatoo of my work and will be there for a long haul (pissed wife ) so think ahead. I never would have thought the plasma arc with 18" clearance would leave a permanant mark in Pave Stones.. Learn from my mistake and cover your assets from damage.
    Laurence

    Leave a comment:


  • Roadster
    replied
    Originally posted by Scott V
    I used a few sheets of 1/2 Hardy tile backer board, on my floor under the plasma table. Works great,and costs about $9.00 at Home Depot. (3' X 5' ) I also used high heat duct tape for the seams.
    Scott, thank you! I never would have thought of that. That's awesome.

    The only Hardibacker that I can find online is max 1/4" thick...

    http://www.jameshardie.com/backerboa...ardibacker.php

    Did you use a generic product, or did you double up the thickness?

    Edit: Scratch that... Hardibacker 500 is 1/2" thick...

    http://www.jameshardie.com/backerboa...ibacker500.php

    Leave a comment:


  • Scott V
    replied
    I used a few sheets of 1/2 Hardy tile backer board, on my floor under the plasma table. Works great,and costs about $9.00 at Home Depot. (3' X 5' ) I also used high heat duct tape for the seams.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Roadster
    replied
    Originally posted by Sberry
    Epoxy will burn with any live sparks on it and any metal that hits it above its melting point will damage it, globs of weld will melt in it and burn. Its essentially a form of plastic,, whatya think it might do to it?
    I don't really know. Hence my question. I know my epoxy floor is much harder than any other plastic that I've seen, and I have been pleasantly surprised at how durable it's been since I moved in, but I've never welded or used a torch inside my garage so far.

    One of the epoxy coating manufacturer's websites said it would be OK to weld above a certain height, similar to what lramberson said. (Can't remember offhand the name of the manufacturer or the specific height, but I read it in a FAQ document online.) Having said that, I'd rather get the real-world experience of people here that have personally tried it, rather than rely on assurances from an epoxy coating manufacturer in an online FAQ.

    What I'm really trying to figure out is whether I can weld/cut with unprotected floor, as long as it's above a certain level, or whether I have to go outside onto the concrete driveway for both. Alternatively, I can put something down to protect the floor where I'm working. Just trying to figure out what I need to do before I start rather than after I screw up.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    Epoxy will burn with any live sparks on it and any metal that hits it above its melting point will damage it, globs of weld will melt in it and burn. Its essentially a form of plastic,, whatya think it might do to it? Hot grinding debris will imbed in it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Roadster
    replied
    Originally posted by lramberson
    If the Plasma arc is any closer than 18" to the floor the Epoxy is toast and will burn through. The slag produced will also discolor and embed in the finish. I have even encountered Plasma arc discoloring Pave Stones in the 18" distance ( the size of my miny saw horses & the wife was not happy ) I have since covered the floor with a piece of stainless in my cutting area and problem solved. Hope this helps,
    Laurence
    Thanks for the feedback. So if I cut higher than 18" above the floor, say 3 ft high, will the epoxy be OK? Did you ever try cutting that high?

    Leave a comment:


  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Heck i used to bubble the concrete with the one i ran at work. I used to cut big sheets of 1/4" on 4x4's on the floor. I guess thats kinda too close. LOL...Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    If the Plasma arc is any closer than 18" to the floor the Epoxy is toast and will burn through. The slag produced will also discolor and embed in the finish. I have even encountered Plasma arc discoloring Pave Stones in the 18" distance ( the size of my miny saw horses & the wife was not happy ) I have since covered the floor with a piece of stainless in my cutting area and problem solved. Hope this helps,
    Laurence

    Leave a comment:


  • Roadster
    replied
    Bulldog, thanks for your comments. Glad to know I'm not the only one that's been pondering this question. I'm getting close to purchasing a Millermatic 210 MIG unit w/3035 spoolgun and a Miller Spectrum 375 or Hypertherm Powermax 380 plasma cutter, but my entire garage floor is already epoxy coated. Before I pull the trigger, I'd really like to clarify this issue.

    Leave a comment:

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