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  • Bob Sigmon
    replied
    Check out the CK Worldwide Click on the style number of the torch that you have and you will get a page that shows the breakdown of the torch with all the industry standard part numbers. If you can't get them locally, you can get them through Tig Depot. If the parts that you need are not listed you can call Cary and he will order them for you.

    If you can hold out til you get back, I'd opt for a number 20 water cooled torch (250amps) and a Coolmate 3. Once you get used to your larger torch, you will think that you've died and gone to heaven with the water cooled torch. If you need to stick with air cooled you can get a number 9 (125amps and same size as a number 20) or a number 17 (150amps).

    I hope this helps,

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  • HAWK
    replied
    Just make sure you are buying parts for the number torch you have. Most brands are interchangeable. If you have a #17 torch, then #17 parts from most any brand should fit.

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  • Prototype3a
    replied
    I like the 60cf bottle I got I'll need to get it filled again soon. I went to one welding shop looking for a middle sized backcap for my #17 torch but the guy at the store said that there's no such thing. Then I went to the local Airgas and the guy there said he could get me one. This was about a week ago. The point is when looking at torch parts how do you know if they'll fit your torch?

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  • HAWK
    replied
    Prototype3a,

    Congratulations on your Dynasty 200DX. The Metabo 5" grinder sounds really nice. When your pressure gauge drops to 500 psi your about out of gas. This is a good rule of thumb to follow.

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  • Prototype3a
    replied
    I traded the 40 for a 60, finally found some wire brushes and got my dynasty 200dx hooked all up. I *REALLY* like the controls on this thing. Right now I'm wishing I had a smaller/lighter torch. I fooled around with it this evening working on repairing an old gov't style rollie chair welding some thin steel sheetmetal to a much thicker pipe. Blew through a couple times since I've never done anything thin really but I finally got comfortable and ran a couple decent beads. I really like how quiet it is (when wearing earplugs). Oh ya the contractor kit comes with the ceriated tungsten. So far it's ok. I dunked the tungsten in the puddle and it doesn't seem to get as "stuck" as thoriated tungsten. It more or less broke free. Haven't really messed with any of the features yet but I should have some time tomorrow to play a bit more before I must leave for a short trip to NYC. I LOVE the angle grinder I got. It's a Metabo WE9-125 (5" variable speed)

    How do you know when your argon bottle is "empty"?

    Leave a comment:


  • Prototype3a
    replied
    Talked to the gas people back home again and they'll let me trade in my 40cf for a 60cf. I think this is a good idea since it's actually $3 LESS to refill the 60. One place (with better gas prices) will only lease the 155cf. We both agreed that this is not a good idea in case I go to sea. The other is willing to sell the 155cf. Neither will rent it. So... I'm considering when I trade the 40 for a 60 to buy another 60 or an 80.

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  • fun4now
    replied
    i agree with burninbriar keep the small bottle and rent a 155 to lern on. my place dosent charge a deposit just the $55.00 rental for the year. i would use the small bottle as a backup incase you run out of gas on a sunday, i have taken mine back for a fill with some gas still in it because i had a project going over the weekend and didnt want to run out and have to stop till monday.they also exchange the bottle so there is little to no wait just swop and go

    i got a lil cheepo 2 wheel dollie for moving the bottle into the shop then it is straped to the wall. befor i got the dollie i just roled it to where i wanted it, lil slower but it got there

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    i agree with burninbriar keep the small bottle and rent a 155 to lern on. my place dosent charge a deposit just the $55.00 rental for the year. i would use the small bottle as a backup incase you run out of gas on a sunday, i have taken mine back for a fill with some gas still in it because i had a project going over the weekend and didnt want to run out and have to stop till monday.they also exchange the bottle so there is little to no wait just swop and go

    Leave a comment:


  • burninbriar
    replied
    My 80 cf is 42" to the top of the valve protecter cap.It weighs 50 pouds.
    Did you ask youre supplyer about renting?My supplyer charges $200.00 returnable deposit and $0.20 per day.Since you mostly do wood work you might want to keep youre 40 cf and rent a 150 to learn on since you will use a lot more learning.My 150 is 48" tall and weighs 75 pounds.
    I would like to see some of youre wod work.I also do wood work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Prototype3a
    replied
    Called the gas suppliers back home and for them it seems as far as small bottles go the 60cf ($0.34/cf refill) seems to be the best deal... I wish I had known a 60cf existed. Oh well. Maybe I can trade my 40cf in for a 60? Only 78lbs eh? That's about the same as a wet sack of shingles. At only $0.25/cf refill you can't beat that with a stick! I gotta go measure my car to see if it'll fit. 7.25"dia x 42" right?

    Leave a comment:


  • burninbriar
    replied
    Being that a sack of cement weighs 94 pounds I would think either cylinder should be within safe lifting limits.

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  • fun4now
    replied
    155cf=78lbs

    well acording to my bath scale it is about 78lbs give or take.

    so if the navy phiz-ed requirements are any where near the same as the army's ( i would thik they are the same ) you should have no problem especily if you get a cheapo 2 wheel dolly. it seems to be the same enpty as it is full so i gess the gas dosent realy add any thing to the LBS. probly just the thick steel to contain the 4000 psi that you have to deal with.

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  • fun4now
    replied
    bathroom scail

    hummmmm cool ideal i'll go do my 155 it is full of C-25 i dont know if the gas makes a diferance or atleas enough of 1 to matter

    Leave a comment:


  • burninbriar
    replied
    Out of curiosity I weighed my cylinders on a bathroom scale.The 80 cf weighs 50 pounds and the 125 weighs 75 pounds.I looked at the sales slip for my 155 cf cylinder and it has 125 written on it so I'm not sure if its 155 or 125.The 125 on my sales slip might be a stock number.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    Prototype3a,

    Welcome to the forum. I have been following this post for a while. As for the 40CF and 80Cf bottles I think they are great. I just have more of them than most guys. It pays to be very saftey conscious! Heavy tanks can cause back, neck, and other unnecessary injuries. Trans filling tanks is NOT a good thing. There are considerable wages to pay for inexperience and lack of proper training when it comes to filling welding gas bottles of any type.

    Smaller tungstens such as .040" and below are typically not necessary. I have used a .020" for some .004" material, but that was a special application. The 1/16" and 3/32" are quite popular with inverters such as the Miller Dynasty series. They will handle the heat and cover all the way to the top end of the Dynasty 200 and 300 on AC and DC. If you are using transformer machines, then you will probably add 1/8" diameter tungstens to your arsenal.

    I have found lanthanated tungsten in a 1.5% alloy blend is great for the Dynasty 200DX. The 2% seems to work better with the Dynasty 300DX. The lanthanated tungten alloy handles the heat better than the ceriated tungsten alloy. Therefore, it maintains its shape longer so there is less grinding or refinishing. Tungsten is cut exactly as you mentioned: Notch it with a grinder and snap it in two pieces. Don't be foolish and snap the end on a work bench with a hammer. The cuts are usually clean, but the flying end piece(s) can really hurt or even blind a person.

    Pjs is right on with Diamond Ground Products, but access may be a problem for you? If you are interested: Jim Elizarraz
    Diamond Ground Products, Inc.
    805-498-3837 Ext. # 226
    Fax: 805-498-9347
    www.diamondground.com


    Tungsten grinders are nice, but not for everybody; especially when starting out. A good bench grinder or belt sander will accomplish the same purpose with practice.

    Best of luck to you.

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