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Yeah another "Which Tig Machine" question...

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  • dhdh71
    replied
    Hello again guys. Well I am thrilled to see so many new responses, I am excited to read thru them. Probably tomorrow though, I'm so tired now I won't retain much info now . Thanks again for all the feedback, everybodies input has been very helpful to me, I appreciate you all!

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    dhdh71,

    I have read and re-read this thread with tremendous interest. I must say I am a Dynasty fan all the way. I do lots of aluminum on AC and some specific DC applications as well. The inverter's DC arc is nice and precise, but not an issue on the work you are describing.

    From what I understand you are happy with the MIG (MM210) and are looking into a TIG machine primarily for mild steel, chrome moly, etc. Aluminum is not a big interest, but you feelings would not be hurt if you had the capabillity.

    A Syncrowave 250DX is my choice as long as you have or can get the required input supply power. Its duty cycle outperforms the Maxstar 200 and Dynasty 200 on DC. It has plenty of power for you to grow into. The money should be close to the Dynasty 200DX with the contractor's kit. If you open to a used machine, there are some really good deals on Sync 250 machines. Also the Sync 250 will give you years of service.

    I think burninbriar has nailed it down well!

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Burninbriar:
    I like the water cooled torches, but my budget wouldn't permit when I bought my D200DX. It is about 1 1/2-2 times the size of your #20 Dback. I don't notice the cables being stiffer but my #17 aircooled is much lighter than the CK I learned on. I am satisfied with the aircooled but hope to buy a coolmate4 and #20 Dback later this year if the money is better, and if my wife permits.

    As for performance it is as you would expect with it really cranked up it gets warm.

    Peace,

    Leave a comment:


  • OldSparks
    replied
    burninbriar

    Maybe I should have put a 'I think' beside that statement but as I understand it machines with high frequency and/or gas solenoids built in usually have a remote contactor (whether hand or foot) to start the hf and gas flow. On the Maxstar STR and CST there is no gas solenoid so a valve on torch is needed to turn on/off flow. Also no hf but lift-arc is totally adaquate. Still the option of adding a remote to control current but isn't really a neccessity on mild as it is on aluminum

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  • burninbriar
    replied
    Hey oldsparks
    I plan on getting a pulser but since the syncrowave left me near broke it will be awile.If you can hold out for about a year I'll let you know how it does on distortion.
    Seriously though,it is my understanding that it helps form the beed,so if it helps to move faster becouse of better beed forming I suppose it could help prevent warpage.
    You say with the maxstar 200 a remote control is needed with the DX and not with the STR or CST? Doesnt the DX have an amp control on the machine?

    Leave a comment:


  • OldSparks
    replied
    dhdh71

    I was surfing around trying to get an idea of prices and found the Applied Welding page. It should answer a few of your questions. Lift-arc and scratch start tig setups are used all the time to produce x-ray quality welds. The possibility of a tungsten inclusion will in no way effect a weld on an automobile project. Also if you're working on your hands and knees you might as well learn to handle your heat without a foot or hand control. It's not that difficult on dc projects. Neither the Maxstar STR or the CST have a gas solenoid so you'd need to get a torch with a valve control on the handle. If you’re only doing attachments and material less then ¼” you won’t need a water-cooled system. Like I mentioned earlier I don't have any experience with pulse on bodywork. If someone comes on and says it'll prevent distortion then you'll have to think about the extra investment. I think if you're going barebones then....Maxstar 200 STR at $1450us or CST 280 at $1600us, also 150 amp, valve on handle torch, flex head with regulator and various assessories at $350us for the kit. Next step up would be the Maxstar 200 DX with HF and pulse…$1800us plus now you’ll also need a hand remote control at around $175us.

    http://www.appliedwelding.com/tech_talk/techfa02.html

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  • OldSparks
    replied
    pjseaman

    All the pictures are fillets. I did them because I haven’t ever tigged at that high an amperage before and figured I’d snap a few pics as I went along. If I was welding an open root v-groove butt joint on ¼” material my heat would be down around 110-130 amps.

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  • Bob Sigmon
    replied
    Water Cooled

    Burninbriar,

    I just got a water cooled torch for my D200DX. What a difference!

    Air cooled torched are much bulkier and harder to manipulate as the power cable is not water cooled and needs to be a heavier gauge wire to handle the amperage.

    I loved my Dynasty with the air cooled torches but the water cooler and water cooled torch is the way to go if you can afford it. Air cooled torches get really hot at times and hence you are having to stop for it to cool. The heat also cause faster degradation of the tungsten, so you are stopping to sharpen more often.

    I'll keep the air cooled just in case I need to go portable, but in the shop I doubt that they will ever be use again.

    Bob Sigmon

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptNemo
    replied
    OK, now I have a better feel for what you're doing. The Snychro 250 is a great machine. I was looking at inverters when they salesman showed me the Synchro. They had it as a return with about a hour of useage on it so they swung me one heck of a deal to clear it off the books. They also took in the "Red" 175 amp Tig that I had bought 4 months prior and gave me what I paid for it 4 months earlier. Look at a water cooled torch, having used both, the water cooled is worth the extra cost.

    BTW, I have a 1940 Plymouth Pick-Up that will probably get a 360 Mopar based engine for the wife to drive.

    Leave a comment:


  • burninbriar
    replied
    Originally posted by pjseaman
    Burninbriar: The inverters are fantastic in DC as well. The air cooled D200DX with contractors kit is under $3000, and a water cooler and torch can be had in the $700-$800 range. The pulse is built in as is the ability to adjust the Htz output up to 250Htz. I haven't used a torch that wasn't big or bulky mostly CK models in the 300 amp size so my Diamondback #17 is sorta tinny by comparison!

    Peace,
    It is my understanding that the adjustable HTZ control is only on AC output.Is this correct?
    Since I have never used an air cooled torch,I'm interested in hearing how you would compair them to water cooled.My Diamondback #20 water cool is very light and easy to manipulate.It has never got hot at all.I can remove the tunsten right after welding and it is completely cool.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Burninbriar: The inverters are fantastic in DC as well. The air cooled D200DX with contractors kit is under $3000, and a water cooler and torch can be had in the $700-$800 range. The pulse is built in as is the ability to adjust the Htz output up to 250Htz. I haven't used a torch that wasn't big or bulky mostly CK models in the 300 amp size so my Diamondback #17 is sorta tinny by comparison!

    Peace,

    Leave a comment:


  • burninbriar
    replied
    I thought if I go through the reasons I chose the Sycrowave 250 you can see if any of my reasoning meets youre needs.
    1) I dont do aluminum but want the capability.For what you spend,it seems kind of foolish to me not to go the cash for a fully capable machine.(since I got the welder I started doing aluminum and am glad I went the extra mile.)
    2) From what Ive read the inverter machines only out perfom on AC and most of my work is DC.Portability is not an needed and supply power is not a problem for me.
    3) The syncrowave is a time proven workhorse.
    4) The 250 comes with a built in water cooler and though I never used an air cooled torch I understand they are large and awkward and do get hot with steady use.
    5) Although I wanted the tig for light guage work I like haveing the power available.I am also useing the 250 to replace my antique Westinghouse AC stick welder.Again to get the watercooler built in I needed the 250 instead of the 180.
    6) The 250 gives me the option of adding a pulser later on.Its a $170.00 add on witch I understand Is extreemly easy to install.

    I think I got it all covered here and I hope this helps a little.I drove myself half nuts trying to decide and am very happy with my Syncrowave.The down side is I spent more than I wated to.My package,Tigrunner with 250 amp water cooled torch and an 80 cf argon cylinder was $3637.00.

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Oldsparks, appologies sir it looked like a butt joint in the first picture, It is much more difficult to evaluate 100% penetration in a tee joint.

    Peace,

    Leave a comment:


  • dhdh71
    replied
    Originally posted by OldSparks
    O.K....so we agree that dhdh71 will be able to weld on his 1/4" attachments with one of the Maxstar/Dynasty 200 series. He's stressed a few times that he's not really interested in aluminum so it can be a dc machine. Maybe someone could write in on the value of the pulse arc for controlling distortion on the sheet metal. I imagine it's a must have for bodywork. In any case I think dhdh71 should go with one of the dc Maxstars or possibly the CST 250. He could spend the money he saved by sticking to dc on a set of anvils and his first tig/practice project could be building an english wheel.
    I like your thinking! Oh how I could use a new home built english wheel! I love tools(like we all do!)

    Leave a comment:


  • dhdh71
    replied
    Keep the great info coming guys, I'm all ears! I've been away for a few days but I'm gonna sit my butt down and read your new posts-Thanks again, keep-em-coming!

    Leave a comment:

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