Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Aluminum welding questions, and one SS/TI question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • jeffscarstrucks
    replied
    Over the last few years I have been to two with Wyatt Swaim of the TIG Depot. He has a pretty long resume' and does a good job for a general interest setting. They were both put on by local supply houses here in St Louis. I also attended one with the welding guru from lincoln who welds for the NHRA tour, Paul, it was just OK. I went to one at Cee Kay supply in St Louis presented by their in house guy named Tim S. It was probably the most in depth as far as teqnique and different applications that I have been to. He is also an instructor at a local college so it was very well laid out. These have all been geared toward a general audience with a range of attendees from hobbiest(me) through industry and motorsports (me too). I try to hit these any time they are available as good info is hard to come by so the more sources I can take in the better. Sorry for the long answer...Thanks again, JEFF

    Leave a comment:


  • GTA/SPEC
    replied
    What seminars have you been to?

    Leave a comment:


  • jeffscarstrucks
    replied
    I use a similar cleaner called Formula 260 and it works pretty well as a general cleaner too. I never thought about the wheel cleaner and I probably have some on the shelf! I have been using Al-Clean byArcAir ( a phos. acid) to clean joints where I'd rather not have brush marks which seems to also work ok but a bit more pricey than some Eagle One wheel product would be. Once again Thanks for the tips. I've been to several well produced TIG seminars but no one has cover this topic. JEFF

    Leave a comment:


  • GTA/SPEC
    replied
    I used an industrial purple cleaner for these. It wasnt the best, but i didnt want to deal with a caustic solution that night. That cleaner was a Zep product, its similar to a concentrated 409. Castoral makes a version too. The best stuff is avaliable from your local auto parts dealer. Eagle 1 brand "Rough Cast Magnesium Wheel Cleaner" it is a mixture of nitric and phosphoric acid. Wear gloves, spray it on, scrub it with a scotch brite pad and wash it off with water. Works great.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeffscarstrucks
    replied
    Thanks for pics. This is the best illustration of the use of the two different tecniques that I have seen. I was wondering about how you cleaned the material before welding. I will be printing this thread for my shop file as I am amazed by the 1000 words the pictures speak. I really appreciate the info from a pure knowledge standpoint as I do not have an direct use for the process in my home shop but it goes a long way to clarifying some of the things I have read. Thanks again , JEFF

    Leave a comment:


  • GTA/SPEC
    replied
    Here are the pics.
    Both are fillets on .700 thick material, 6061-t6, .093 4043 filler, componets were at room temp prior to weld, 55 deg f,
    I sliced the weldments in a cold saw, then faced them with a fly cutter on a mill. I dont have the facilities to polish, but you can still see the penetration.

    First, image002
    AC, 120 hz, 75% bal, 100% Argon, .125 2% Ceria Tung, 300 amps

    Second, image003
    DC, 100% Ultra High Purity Helium, .093 2% Ceria Tung, 180 amps
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • GTA/SPEC
    replied
    That right Hawk, hope to have some pics later today.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    Blown S-10,

    Never had any luck with dirty Al on DC. It is bad enough to to clean well on AC. Cleaning is a necessity here. An abrasive cleaning followed by a chemical cleaning is a good start. Don't wait too long to weld after cleaning. I have always used He. Never tried Ar.

    BTW: Read closely the posts by GTA on out of the ordinary stuff. He is not going to tell you how to straight out, but there is some good info in his posts. Remember an open mind to new techniques is worth a lot when the time comes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blown S-10
    replied
    thats kinda odd HAWK. i tried it just for ****s&grins. 1.2" 6061, about 1/2" from the edge, argon. it melted it almost like butter, seemed to me that dc aluminum would need less power. what am i missing ? the metal was not very clean, so it looked REALLY crappy. but it melted it EASY. 1/4" penetration easy

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    Originally posted by pjseaman
    GTA all the aluminum I've ever seen welded was done AC with high frequency,
    I would like to see some DC for comparison.

    Peace,

    The cheapest way to accomplish DC GTAW of AL is using DCSP with 100 helium. Make sure you Al is mechanically and chemically cleaned prior to welding. Use a good sharpened tungsten. It takes considerably more heat and patience than does AC GTAW. Try some 1/8" Al at 200 amps with the He shielding gas. Your D200DX will start well with pure helium. Good luck.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeffscarstrucks
    replied
    GTA, Thanks for the reply; that is an interesting aproach that I've only read about in the past. I would love to see some pics if you get a chance! Thanks again, JEFF

    Leave a comment:


  • GTA/SPEC
    replied
    eric75
    You can Oxy-Hy weld aluminum, with no flux. This method was used to weld aircraft fuel tanks in the 30s and 40s


    pjseaman
    i will snap some pics, also if you have seen AC tig welds from an inverter, then you have seen it done with out HF Continuous


    Gaslight
    ive used harris


    lramberson
    It cuts steel, it will only melt and blow away non ferrous material


    jeffscarstrucks & Brass Monkey
    When i weld aluminum with DC, I never use more than 180 amps. That current coupled with 24v across the arc is over 4kW/s of heat input. The corona coming off of a .093 dia tungsten and an arc length of .060 is more than enough to weld any thickness of aluminum. Last week i showed a customer how to weld billit section of aluminum together in half the time than it took with his Aerowave - running wide open. He gets $110 per weldment and it was taking him one hour per part. Now he can do 2 parts per hr. The customer cant tell the difference. Neither can 90% of the seasoned tig welders that i know. Let me snap some pics, you will see.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brass Monkey
    replied
    dc welding alum

    I have done it in work just to see how well it goes.I prefer to tig weld it in ac mode. On occasion I build pressure boxes for molds for the plastics industry(steel or alum).But I definatley like to do all my alum work in ac.I found dc welding alum you have to crank it up for it to work well.THE RESULTS I HAD FROM DC WELDING WERE GOOD AS FAR AS I WAS CONCERNED BUT IT COULD HAVE BEEN PRETTIER IN THE AC MODE. I WOULDNT WANT TO USED IT ON THIN STUFF FOR SURE. PENETRATION WAS MY MAIN CONCERN THEN AIR TIGHT BUT IT WORKED OUT WELL BUT ILL STICK TO AC UNLESS THERE IS A REASON NOT TO. BTW I did a lot oF oa work with propellers at H&H Propeller for 12 yrs I oa'd bronze propellers and tig'd alum,st,sst,and nibral,OXY/ACET BRAZING/WELDING WAS A LOT OF FUN I THOUGHT BUT THE BLUE FLUX WAS MURDER.I HAD TO EAT A ROLL OF ROLLAIDS EVERY DAY TO KEEP FROM GETTING THE FLUX FLU. THAT STUFF IS BRUTAL.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeffscarstrucks
    replied
    I believe that DC TIG on aluminum is reserved for fairly thick weldments that require A LOT of heat input. I read up on it some time ago and realized that it didn't have much application in the mainstream. I'd like to know if those in the trade have actually used it and in what situations. JEFF

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Henrob makes a torch that will OA weld aluminium very well.. Dip a aluminium 4043 tig rod in Wilco Harris #10 flux and that torch will weld very similar to a tig set up but the torch is OA & no electricty or gas I have the torch and it cuts like no OA I have ever used (percise) & uses 80 percent less gas (4psi acetolene & 4 psi oxygen on 3/8 steel and non ferrous metal) Have not had much time to practice on welding but looks very promising.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X