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  • Scott V
    replied
    You might be surprized on how many Sycro 250 run very well on less then a 100 amp circruits. If the wiring is sized for the circuit it will be fine if not pushed in the stick mode.
    Let just say if you only have a 30 amp circuit you could tig weld till the machine went into meltdown, without any issues what so ever from your input power.

    I find the little Thermal to be a great machine if you know how to use it.

    Remember Aaron ran his on a 30 amp circuit and it showed 199 amp on the meter. Could of been how the meter works but that is what it showed.

    The Thermal is just a great deal and thats it. Sanrex knows how to build the machines to thermal-arc specs. Very flexable in how that company will build small runs of special machine for different customers.

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    before everyone gets on me for suggesting a TA machine over a Miller unit

    we dont o that here. i have found that this is 1 of the few sites that alows 1 to express there oopinion without being atacked.(well most of the time) advice is just that you take it all with a grain of salt. look at all of it and then decide for youre self after all it is youre $$$$$.

    with farm equipment in the picture i would opt for the MM251 and the dyn200 yes the $800 is a lot but should you have a problem miller will be there for you. will the people at TA?? you should check that out befor you buy some have a TA suport option in there area and some do not.with the dyn200 you will have the option to TIG thicker than you will with the TA185. some have found suport for there TA available and i too have not herd anything but + about the TA185 and came close to getting 1 myself but decided to wait save and get the dyn200 insted (some day ) the dyn has more to offer than just an extra 15amps for that $800.

    Scott V
    The 185 Thermal draws 29 amps 230 input at full output in tig.
    i was going buy the sails sheet i had on hand it aasks for 38amps for 160amps stick that tells me i should be on a 40Amp circuit from a safty standpoint it would be foolish to put it on a 30Amp circuit. and i dont think TA would recomend a 30A. circuit that is why i said it needs 40A.
    atached is that sheet
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • GARAGEGADGETS
    replied
    I agree with the comment that there are smart people throughout the world - but my point was not that the products are less then those made in the USA, I was simply saying that trying to get the parts and/or having repairs done are much easily done when working with a local company verus one somewhere in Asia or Europe. Also, FYI, Lincoln has acquired Century, Solar, and Marquette (all of these have made machines for Snap-On, Mac Tool, and Matco Tools) which are deleteing the parts for these welders and plasma cutters forcing individuals to purchase new equipment. Hopefully, you will make the right choice when choosing a new or used machine, that's a decision that is yours and yours alone. I know what it feels like to get burned on good deals.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scott V
    replied
    Remember : You get what you pay for...

    That is exactly why I bought a Thermal-arc import (Sanrex) . Top quality throughout!!! I also bought a esab and a passport for the same reasons.

    The world is a pretty big place and there is smart people all over it.

    Even Miller has used the sytem before. The Maxstar 140 was not made here.
    Some people really like that machine.

    Leave a comment:


  • GARAGEGADGETS
    replied
    What to buy

    Buy a machine that is built and assembled in the USA . You will find that alot of machines are using a american company name on them but assembled elseware & when it comes to getting technical support & parts - good luck. Remember : You get what you pay for...

    Leave a comment:


  • Danny
    replied
    Originally posted by krieger
    Thanks for the input guys. I'm trying to familiarize myself with all the latest terminology.Back in college I worked at a welding shop,really enjoyed TIG-ing,didn't know everything about the set-up,boss would get it set close and I would go to town.I haven't welded aluminum in 18 yrs, just been getting by with my old Miller dial-an amp stick-box I've had since high school.

    I am doing a semi-major boat project,and will be working with .100 -1/4 alum.
    18yrs. ago I could TIG alum much better than MIG at that thickness, maybe that has all changed with the new machines.

    From what I've seen so far, I'd like a MM251 and one of those 200DX's that everyone is talking about. 220v isn't a problem,I can stick a bigger breaker in the box.I will also be making farm machinery repairs,which a nice MIG would be great for, I think.

    Money is somewhat of an issue, but I'm old enough to know you get what you pay for.

    keep the advice coming...
    The MM 251 would be a great choice for most farm machinery welding. It has an excellent arc, and a weld puddle that wets out nicely. Plus the power to weld some pretty thick material, along with a very good duty cycle. A MM 210 would be an acceptable 2nd choice if you need to do some budget cutting to fit in both a TIG and a MIG. If at all possible though, spend the extra on the MM 251, because it is an impressive unit. The MM210 is a nice unit too, however, it just isn t in the same league as the MM 251.

    As far as the Dynasty 200 goes, Im really not sold on wanting to spend an extra $800 + on the Dynasty over a Thermal Arc 185. The Thermal arc 185 has been out for quite sometime now, and i have yet to see any negative feedback on it. So, if i had a need to TIG aluminum, I 'd more than likely go with the thermal arc 185. Then spend the $800+ that i saved on something else, like the bench top press brake that i ve been wanting for bending thick flat bar.


    BTW, before everyone gets on me for suggesting a TA machine over a Miller unit on this site, here's the list of my current Miller built units.
    1. MM 251
    2. MM 210
    3. MM 175
    4. Maxstar 150 STH
    5. Econotig - should have been a Syncrowave 180
    6. Hypertherm Powermax 380- made by Miller
    7. Plus my wish list item is a Passport 180

    Leave a comment:


  • tackit
    replied
    KB FabricationsNot advocating brand loyalty or anything, I bet a skilled operator (or maybe a newbie who never welded before) might be able to make either of those machines work just fine for their given parameters. Lincoln and Miller both make a good/great product (based on both's track record and the fact that they are still in business) and some of us are lucky enough to know that first hand.

    I agree KB Fabrications. Competition is what makes them become even better companies.

    I love the way it works, as long as loyalists don't crap/foul up our great system with brown nosing, pie in the sky excuses and covering up short comings to the point of adnauseam our companies will produce even better products and give better services in the future. Nothing more worse than resting on laurels..

    Since ITT bought em out I'm watching for their college boy engineers to start using more aluminum, plastic and ((WOOD)). hehehe.

    Leave a comment:


  • KB Fabrications
    replied
    Originally posted by tackit
    interesting comparison of the two small migs, keeping in mind lincoln did the testing.

    http://content.lincolnelectric.com/pdfs/products/literature/av564.pdf#search='Lincoln%20SP%20135%20plus'
    Not advocating brand loyalty or anything, I bet a skilled operator (or maybe a newbie who never welded before) might be able to make either of those machines work just fine for their given parameters. Lincoln and Miller both make a good/great product (based on both's track record and the fact that they are still in business) and some of us are lucky enough to know that first hand.

    Leave a comment:


  • tackit
    replied
    interesting comparison of the two small migs, keeping in mind lincoln did the testing.

    http://content.lincolnelectric.com/pdfs/products/literature/av564.pdf#search='Lincoln%20SP%20135%20plus'

    Leave a comment:


  • krieger
    replied
    Thanks for the input guys. I'm trying to familiarize myself with all the latest terminology.Back in college I worked at a welding shop,really enjoyed TIG-ing,didn't know everything about the set-up,boss would get it set close and I would go to town.I haven't welded aluminum in 18 yrs, just been getting by with my old Miller dial-an amp stick-box I've had since high school.

    I am doing a semi-major boat project,and will be working with .100 -1/4 alum.
    18yrs. ago I could TIG alum much better than MIG at that thickness, maybe that has all changed with the new machines.

    From what I've seen so far, I'd like a MM251 and one of those 200DX's that everyone is talking about. 220v isn't a problem,I can stick a bigger breaker in the box.I will also be making farm machinery repairs,which a nice MIG would be great for, I think.

    Money is somewhat of an issue, but I'm old enough to know you get what you pay for.

    keep the advice coming...

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    I'd vote for the mm135 and a Dynasty 200DX! I've used most of the machines mentioned and the D200DX rocks and for thin mig the mm135 is fantastic.

    Just my .02,

    Leave a comment:


  • Scott V
    replied
    The 185 Thermal draws 29 amps 230 input at full output in tig.
    The SP 135 plus Lincolns have a better track record then the Millers or Hobarts in reliability. They are just tougher units !!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    Mm135

    well it may not count for much but i give the MM135 all thumbs up . i have had mine for almost a year now ith no problems and great performance.

    as for circuit power the dynasty 200 needs 30A 220V or 120V, TA185 requires a 40A 220V, the syncro needs 54A 220V.all have been given great reviews and any would do what you need. if you have 220V i would agree that a MM175 or MM210 would be better if you have the $$$ and might need to weld 1/4"

    Leave a comment:


  • Scott V
    replied
    Originally posted by rb455ho
    Scott, I believe my next logical question is. How does the thermalarc machine compare to the dynasty 200 in performance and price and reliability? I do not believe you can kill a transformer machine but the inverters are more susceptable. Can you elaborate please.

    They sold tons of Thermal-arc 185 and it has no issues with reliablity.
    The Dynasty 200 will have a edge because of features, mostly the 120 volt one. I would probably go with a Dynasty 200 for that and the the extra HZ adjustment.

    I was looking around my shop and just noticed all I have in it is inverters at this time.


    I guess I fall for the inverter side of things.


    Thermal 101` cutmaster
    Thermal 38 XL
    Thermal 300 TSW
    Easb 350 mpi
    Esab 161
    Esab 160 mutimaster
    Miller Passport

    Leave a comment:


  • Danny
    replied
    Krieger,

    We can help you out better on this, if you gave us an idea on the material thickness range that you want to cover. Plus, how about an idea on how much you're willing to spend. Personally, if I have a 230 volt input power source available, a 175 amp mig is the smallest machine i would consider. I know there are several internet weldors who boast how there little 120 volt unit can weld 1/4" or thicker steel. I 've ran several of these small 120 volt unit, and once you hit 1/8" or thicker, using a solid wire, the little unit can't keep up with the 230 volt 175 amp machine performance wise. As far as the 175/180 amp unit go, I ve ran the Lincoln sp 175+, MM 175, and HH 180. In my opinion, if the MM 175 didn t have the wire speed tracking feature, it would be the best of the three. This feature makes dialing the arc in on the MM 175 more complicated then it should be. Therefore, for ease of operation, and quality performance, my vote will have to go with the Lincoln sp 175+ until the wirespeed tracking feature is elimated from the MM 175. As far as the HH 180 goes, the arc performance of the top two taps is rough, so I really don t like it.

    Out of the Miller all-in-one units that i currently own, my MM 251 has become my favorite. Performance wise it is an excellent unit.

    I also have a MM 210, it's a nice unit for the hobbyist level weldor, who wants to mainly weld 1/4" or thinner. Its tapped design makes it a simple unit to deal with dialing the arc in on.


    As far as a TIG unit goes, the Syncrowave 180 will handle the thickness of aluminumm that you have mentioned. However, since it is a transformer based unit, if I remember right, you're going to need at least a 70 amp 230 volt circuit for the unit. Whereas if i remember right, the Thermal Arc unit that Scott mentioned only needs around a 30 amp circuit.

    Leave a comment:

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