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  • #16
    man, your making me what to try it . sounds like a real pita.

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    • #17
      Took me a second to figure out what pita meant, no doubt. I'm a real can-do kind of guy. I'm happiest when I'm in pitas over my head. When I cracked the books open I thought I'd helping a guy out. By the time I was done reading, I was bummed.

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      • #18
        Thanks for the in depth reply. That's what I was looking for. I too like to try something that everybody says isn't worth the effort. As a matter of fact, that's the reason I have this engine in the first place. This engine is out of a 2004 KTM 525SX motocross bike. I'm putting it in a 2001 Yamaha Raptor ATV. This engine has been put in ATV's before but, I don't think it has been put in a Raptor. Everybody says that Raptor's are no good for motocross and I should just sell it and get something else instead of dumping more money on top of the untold thousands I have already spent on it. Anyway, I'll probably just get the new store bought billet cover and then just to see if I can, try to modify this one. I will definitely let you know how it turns out.

        One thing puzzles me though, why did you say I shouldn't use AC on my Dynasty? I kinda thought some of the other more experienced pillars of this community would chime in.
        Zeb's Welding and Machine

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        • #19
          AC on the dynasty is awesome, and I would give it a try using AC and ceriated or lanthanated tungsten. You said you probably would just buy a new one, try fixing the old one first then if you win you've saved some bucks!

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          • #20
            My typo, I left out the phrase "with a balled tungsten" from that sentence. I should proof read closer. That post got long and the wife was way past ready to leave by then. Sorry

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            • #21
              I used to help our welder repair mag parts (covers-gearbox halves etc) either he built up mounting pads or repaired cracks. This was for aircraft engines and accesories for an airline. The parts were preheated to 300* in an oven then wrapped in aspestest? blanket. He would then place the part and blanket in a clear plastic bag the torch would be inside the bag and the bag taped around the hose. Another argon hose would be in the bag and sealed with tape as well. The entire part was purged. The blanket was opened just enough to expose the repaired area. He would hold the torch through the plastic and poke the filler rod through the bag and complete the weld job. After welding the part would go back to the oven for controled cooling.

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              • #22
                Thanks for the cool trick Glenn Bon. Macgyver style purge chamber. Never heard of that before. That's exactly why I read this board. Sounds like mag must be extremely sensitive to contamination. I remember reading an article about ten years ago in Dirt Bike where super hunky was talking about fixing cracked cases by welding, he also said he had such a crappy time he just started using JB weld when possible. One other thing I was going to mention in my original post was that the books also had procedures using DCEP, that might be worth trying. Although I have never tig welded using DCEP

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                • #23
                  Glenn Bon:
                  Great info/idea, keep it coming.

                  Thanks

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                  • #24
                    You will setup your machine to weld magnesium exactly the same as you would to weld aluminum. Make sure you clean the weld area real good. The part you are talking about welding is probably a die casting and not a sand casting so you shouldnt encounter alot of porosity contamination. The weld bead will form just like aluminum. If you encounter contamination at some point, what i`ve had good luck doing is get off the heat and just slowly work the area in a circular motion applying just enough heat to float the contamination to the surface. Then stop and wire brush or grind it out. You may have to do this a couple of times before the area will accept your filler rod allowing you to continue the weld. Speaking of filler rod, you will need to aquire magnesium filler rod , and it is abit on the expensive side. Last i remember, it was $26.00 a pound with a half pound minimum. As the others have mentioned, keep the filings and shavings away from the weld area and you wont have any trouble with magnesium fire.
                    I wouldnt reccommend welding alum. to magnesium, although you may be able to join the two with 4043 alloy and some luck, it surely would not be a sound weld with any real strength.

                    Good luck with your project,
                    Dave.

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                    • #25
                      I have made a number of magnesium wrenches for a roll mill machine shop. The open end of the wrench (14.500”) is machined out of ¾” magnesium plate stock then welded to a machined handle made from magnesium bar stock. The easiest part of the job was welding the two together. It’s different but is as straightforward as welding aluminum.

                      The headache with magnesium is the dust and shavings. Minute particles left on the floor anywhere around your work area (after sweeping) ignite instantly the next time grinder sparks hit the floor.

                      Rough cutting on a bandsaw, sanding with a disc/belt machine and any machining operation, is a major clean up effort. The stationary belt sander started glowing at the base one afternoon, two hours after someone used it with steel. A build up of mag. dust had accumulated in the bottom of the machine.

                      I think I would opt for the billet kit, unless you have a lot more time and patience than me.
                      I would also price out a new cover for your engine so you know what it will cost you if the cover should be ruined in the process.

                      Good luck.

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                      • #26
                        alright!! not only is it really hard to work with, but if you cut it or grind it you might set your shop on fire later, while you're working on something else. I gotta go buy some just so I can try welding it!!!!

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                        • #27
                          Stinkinlincoln.

                          I do not know how old you are but your last comment reminds me of when I was a youngster about 22 years old. The more negatives I received about something I wanted to pursue the more aggressive I became to actually doing it.

                          Never let that voice within your system that beckons you to try the “unknown” be strayed by negative comments as “impossible”, “you can’t do that”, “it will never work”, “forget about it.” Self satisfaction has always been the driving force for me and all my adventures. I have been kicked in the butt a number of times by my lack of knowledge, however when something you try does work, the accomplishment and personal satisfaction are hard to beat.

                          Give it a shot, and good luck.

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                          • #28
                            While looking for magnesium filling rod sources, a search turned up this thread.

                            FYI, I just ordered a one (1) pound bundle of 1/16" AZ-61A from the Welding Warehouse 1-800-800-1150. http://www.incoweld.com/magnesium.html They were happy to sell/ship small bundles of magnesium and other exotic alloys.

                            The only other places I've contacted would only sell ten (10) pound minimums.

                            Price for this was $82.00/pound...

                            I'll post pictures if the project turns out okay!
                            (Miller 200DX machine)
                            Randy Forbes
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                            • #29
                              Protrax, my Chemistry teacher buddy had a block of Magnesium 12x18x2 inches. He was going to cut it on a band saw and collect the chips to burn for his students. Had done it once, but not many chips for the effort and you ended up with a piece that could not be cut or burned easy. Sooooooo, me being mr wanna be machinist said gimme a shot. I but that sucker on my radial arm saw and twisted the head 45 degrees so the blade made a circular cut or u groove. Bingo, every cut I would lower the the blade 1/64 of an inch, .016 for you wanna be machinist's, and I was getting the most beautiful stringy and long stuff, just like what is in a flash bulb. For you younguns, kinda like fine curley baby hair. No fire, I even tried to light it up where it had gotten on a stump, just a few sparkies. Anyway, by the time I had gone through a 6 pack, I had reduced that block to 12x9 and made 2[two] 35 gallon trash cans of chips and one more big garden garbagebag worth. It did ignite good when you put a match to it, but the heat of cutting never bothered it. Hey, what else is there to do on a weekend in Florida at my age????? Paul
                              More Spark Today Pleasesigpic

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                              • #30
                                Agreeing with a couple others who posted already... mag welds just like aluminum so no sweat. Just get it as clean as l possible. We just shear off thin strips of sheet mag to use for filler rod, but I realize everyone doesn't have sheet mag and a shear at home. Try it, you'll like it!
                                sigpic
                                bOb
                                Bobs Welding Service

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