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Steel Tubing strength

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  • #31
    Hi Paul....Yeah, steels have a numerical designation......the first two digits represent the classification, 10 is for low cabron steel, the second set represents the mid-point of the carbon content.....the actual percent will vary a bit from batch to batch.....

    I only mentioned using the ERW for the front and rear clips for those who are on a tight budget.....I prefer to use the DOM throughout for all my 1 3/4 and 1 1/2 tubes......then use the ERW for the smaller tubing used as braces and brackets........

    Example, for a streetstock or modified type chassis......I would use 1 3/4 095 wall DOM......then for the front and rear clips use 1 1/2 083 wall DOM...........and use 1 1/4 ERW for diagonal braces in the clips.......

    But Again...... Most sanctioning bodies have specs on the materials and design.....One really needs to check the rules carefully before building........

    As far as coping the tubing...........Mittler Bro's Ultimate tubing notcher is the way to go......But it is pricy......over 4 grand by the time you buy some cutters and tax.......

    It is bascally just a motor with a gearbox and a chuck thaqt holds an end mill.......the tube is clamped in a vise......set the angle you want and in just a few seconds, you have a perfect cut........

    The edges need de-burred......I use a 2x48 sander to clean those up.......really is a fantastic set-up......

    There are various holesaw type notchers.......you often see those on E-bay.........these work ok for limited use.........

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    • #32
      Check out the chopperhandbook site, they have info on pipe vs ERW and DOM. I think at a minimum there are difference in finish, which affects the surface that is picking up the load, like a stress riser, and there is a difference in tensile strength, and the care put into the welds, in terms of minimum standards, but that's just what I am carrying in my head.

      You can find mills for as little a 10 bucks, and buy a dedicated metal lathe for 700, you end up with a good coping set-up. Another good option is a beaumont metal works belt sander with a small wheel kit tunned for the tubbing size you grind. That thing will swallow coping, and you can grind out a sword in your spare time, a lot more versatile.

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