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c25 or straight co2

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  • HAWK
    replied
    bigwelder,

    I believe everybody here is using the term "axial spray" to refer to the molten metal traveling across the axis of the arc. It is a very stable process producing consistent results as long as the shielding gas used in hot enough to promote a constant spray. It is used for in position and horizontal fillet welds where the highly molten weld pool cannot easily roll out. The brother to axial spray is pulsed spray and can be used to weld in all positions due to the pulsing creating a freezing puddle so it does not run out in out of position welding.

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  • HAWK
    replied
    bigwelder,

    Spray arc does sound like a hissing air hose or aerosol can. It is actually many tiny molten metal drops traveling across the arc. You are literally spraying metal. The spray is very white and bright!

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  • bigwelder
    replied
    axial spray?

    would axial spray sound similiar to a high pressure air hoase when u weld with it cause i know it took me a long time to get used to the sound of the welders at my new job becasue they used miller cp 302 machines heat set at 6 or 7 with wire speed cranked up almost all the way?

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  • HAWK
    replied
    Originally posted by Rocky D

    Rocky,

    Thank you for the link!

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  • Mike W
    replied
    I get very little spatter with my Hobart using CO2. Say in a 2" bead, I may have 6 tiny little balls.

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  • Scott V
    replied
    Originally posted by ASKANDY
    10-4 Leons.

    Unless you are doing heavy wall or thick weldments where you are not spraying or pulse spraying and you can deal with the spatter then Co2. I prefer C25 and only use the Co2 for doing I-beam tongues on all these landscaping trailers that come in bent all to ****.

    Andy
    What Spatter? I use a Passport on CO2.

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  • ASKANDY
    replied
    10-4 Leons.

    Unless you are doing heavy wall or thick weldments where you are not spraying or pulse spraying and you can deal with the spatter then Co2. I prefer C25 and only use the Co2 for doing I-beam tongues on all these landscaping trailers that come in bent all to ****.

    Andy

    Leave a comment:


  • Leons2003
    replied
    We used the jet rods on skid fab. back in early '60's. Tis good for horizontal welds, can lay down some kind of beads, gota love 'um. they did bring in a mig w/large wire, don't remember the size, but didn't pan out.
    I had a project a short time back, purchased a box of 5/32" jets, dang near smoked my machine due to not watching the duty but lovin that bead, LOL

    As I remember it, when I purchased my mig from the Linde dealer where my bride was employed, Joe the welding procedures guy suggested for autobody work that Stargon would weld cooler that C25, however I never did try it.

    I think Andy suggested C25 is best for light matl., that st. CO2 would not be necessary since there is not a penetration issue.

    Good day all,
    L*S

    Leave a comment:


  • Danny
    replied
    Originally posted by storts
    My dist dropped of a small tank of "stargon" whats every bodys thought on it? to me it ran hotter than the 75/25,,and was told it was alot cheaper? like I said use the mig for tacking and expanded metal guards,etc, use alot of 7024 Jet, all 1/4 "plate tanks,,,never looked on the label of what stargon was made of? anybody else use it on a reg. basis?Thanks, Jack
    Dang Jack,

    Maybe instead of getting the SP 175+ you should have gotten yourself a MM 251 or PM 255 so that you could spray arc this 1/4" plate instead of having to deal with the slag and continuos rod changing of 7024. Oh well, I guess it isn t to bad, after all if you get the current set right, the slag just peels right off behind you as your welding. 7024 is the rod that they started us off on back in 1988 when i went to welding school, it is definitely one of my favorite rods to run. Didn t like it much at first though, because they had us running it on DC+ at the start so that we could learn how to deal with arc blow.

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  • Scott V
    replied
    I used Airgas version. The weld really wets out but you have to get use to the sound of the arc. It sounds a little like welding with tri-mix. You are welding along and it sounds like crap, but when you look at the finished bead it really looks pretty nice. Different for sure. I also used some other mixes that had different % of the same gases. They do spray pretty nice too.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    storts,

    Hey Jack,

    Glad to see you around the forum. Welcome! I have never welded with PRAXAIR'S STARGON. However, here is an excerpt from their website regarding argon, CO2, and O2 mixtures.

    Argon-Carbon Dioxide-Oxygen Mixtures -- Praxair's Stargon® CS and RoboStar® CS Blends
    Stargon® CS Gas Blend
    Mixtures containing these three components are versatile, due to their ability to operate using short-circuiting, globular, spray, pulsed, and high-density transfer modes. Several ternary compositions are available and their application depends on the desired metal transfer mode.

    The advantage of this blend is its ability to shield carbon steel and low-alloy steel of all thicknesses using any metal transfer mode applicable. Praxair's Stargon CS produces good welding characteristics and mechanical properties on carbon low-alloy steels and some stainless steels. On thin gauge base metals, the oxygen constituent assists arc stability at very low current levels (30 to 60 amps) permitting the arc to be kept short and controllable. This helps minimize excessive melt-through and distortion by lowering the total heat input into the weld zone. Stargon is generally used for spray arc welding, providing high deposition rates and often higher travel speeds than carbon dioxide.

    RoboStar® CS Gas Blend
    The carbon dioxide and oxygen levels in Praxair's RoboStar CS blend are balanced to produce excellent arc stability and arc performance in demanding automatic and robotic applications. High quality welds at higher levels of productivity are produced with this shielding gas mixture. The RoboStar CS blend will help to develop excellent weld metal strength and toughness as well as improved fatigue strength in a number of application areas.

    Check out PRAXAIR'S WEBSITE

    If you are doing a lot of tacking, maybe the STARGON would be beneficial.

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  • storts
    replied
    I do very little mig exept for tacking and expanded metal

    My dist dropped of a small tank of "stargon" whats every bodys thought on it? to me it ran hotter than the 75/25,,and was told it was alot cheaper? like I said use the mig for tacking and expanded metal guards,etc, use alot of 7024 Jet, all 1/4 "plate tanks,,,never looked on the label of what stargon was made of? anybody else use it on a reg. basis?Thanks, Jack

    Leave a comment:


  • cadder
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike W
    -snip- For some reason it reads too high. I am in the process of fiquring out why.

    just thinking out loud:
    turbulence/ambient temp-->>
    increased gas temp-->>
    increased gas volume-->>
    increased flow rate?

    If you had a single gas with a flow meter, then check valve, then a heating chamber, then another flow meter, it makes sense to me that the second flow meter would read higher than the first.

    Ben

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike W
    replied
    CaptBob, you might look around on ebay to see if any are available. Basically, I am using the flow meters on the cylinders to set the ratio. I go thru check valves to a mixing chamber. I have a flow meter at the output. For some reason it reads too high. I am in the process of fiquring out why.

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptBob
    replied
    RE:gas mixer

    Originally posted by Mike W
    Welcome Captbob! I am putting together one along the lines of this one: http://www.star.bnl.gov/STAR/pmd/sta...as_system.html
    Looks like the mixer is metric. Have to get out the conversion tables.
    I didn't see where the parts were purchased. Can you help me out here.
    PS This is a new frontier for me, so my replies may not be timely. (Too many moving parts!) Guess I'm better at welding than computers
    SO, having said that, I look forward to trying to build a mixer.
    Thanks. Capt Bob

    Leave a comment:

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