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  • HAWK
    replied
    DoctorD,

    Do a search for KB fabrications. I think he does a lot of frame work with a Dynaty 200DX. Check it out. Perhaps if you post a new thread to KB's attention with your email, he will get back to you.

    Leave a comment:


  • aphexafx
    replied
    DoctorD, here is an great site about bicycle frame building and welding...in case you're interested:

    Anvil Bike Works

    I have a GT Zaskar LE frame (6061 aluminum) hand built in the US before GT went down and had to sell out. It's beautiful. I want to build a frame myself someday, but you really need to have a grasp on pipe/tube welding before you attempt this because of the huge stresses that bicycle frames undergo. If the frame fails while you're heading down the mountain, serious injuries are bound to occur.

    Anyhow, it's an interesting site and they make a series of very cool frame building jigs and tools.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    If the cost isnt scary the Dynasty 200 is the way to go. It does a lot of things well, good small stick machine, very portable too.

    Leave a comment:


  • DoctorD
    replied
    An excellent group of people...

    y'all have proven to be!
    Thanks a million for your candor regarding the things to consider. I am ready to go... I want to TIG motorcycle frames, bicycle frames, thin walled and thick walled metals (gas tanks, tubing, etc) I want to create!!!! Artisitic wrought iron stuff, whatever I can...probably sounds naive, right? May be so, but I want to make it happen, and I will...
    Again, thnks to all for your advice and support...now, let's weld!!!

    DoctorD

    Leave a comment:


  • wendell
    replied
    Doc,
    If you spend half your time in front of a TIG and the other half infront of the computer looking at this site, you'll be up and running in no time.

    If you want to weld AL (hard to imaging a welding dream that didn't involve aluminum) and you have 100A service with a 220V outlet start looking for a used syncrowave 180, 250, 300 or 350. You shouldn't have a problem finding one for under $1000. Once you get one, badger the kind folks on this board till you figure out how to stick two pieces of metal together with it.

    Sounds easy right?

    Leave a comment:


  • arcdawg
    replied
    Originally posted by Sberry
    Hey Dawg, you bought the book, went to the school now you have to get a job ??????

    cary, there are NO welding jobs in my area..........and if there is its a s.hole paying 8$ an hour.......so i work for my neighbor making $15 an hour banging nails..........

    dawg

    Leave a comment:


  • aphexafx
    replied
    Originally posted by arcdawg
    i cant even get the biggie size fries
    Well, at least you'll probably live longer.

    DoctorD:

    I learned how to gas weld in HS, and this indeed helped when I learned to TIG weld. BUT, I know two people who have never tried any other type of welding, and they can TIG really really well - and they've never, nor have I, attended a class. If you have a chance a class would probably help you get where you want to be much faster.

    I think, though, that anyone who is set on learning how TIG weld and can course themselves through the learning process will be able to pick it up no problem. You do seem enthusiastic about it and I'll bet you'll find that you will do very well.

    Oh yeah, you should go with a Miller. Realistically, since your learning, you should go with whatever you can find that will fit your needs and budget. (Well, duh!..yeah, I know...) If you can find a used machine, that might be a good, safe route to follow. The Syncrowave 180 is great to learn with so I've heard. If you have the cash, you really couldn't go wrong with a Dynasty 200DX as a first machine - it will do anything you might be interested in trying as you experiment and learn.

    Or you could get an Econtig with everything you need except gas. You will learn how to TIG weld, but at some point you will be like..erm..this machine is limiting me...

    Get back to us and good luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    Hey Dawg, you bought the book, went to the school now you have to get a job ??????

    Leave a comment:


  • arcdawg
    replied
    Originally posted by HAWK
    Doctor D,




    ArcDawg,

    Don't forget some of the specialty VP TIG units that push the $50,000 and above range.
    well hawk on my DOLLAR MENU budget .........i cant even get the biggie size fries let alone a $50,000 tig machine

    dawg

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    What's up, Doc? (VERY sorry - just could NOT resist that tempation!)
    Welcome!

    You say you've got your mind set on TIG; so be it.

    If you plan to do any welding, even the most elementary hobby work, you will need a ton of stuff besides the welding machine. Hand tools, power tools (grinders, saws, etc.) clamps, a welding table (built by YOU as your first project!) and myriad devices. How's your shop now? Got stuff?

    The suggestion to get an oxy-acetylene outfit was a good one. An O/A rig will be invaluable to you as a welding enthusiast unless your interest is only aluminum.

    Pick up a book and get acquainted with terms and techniqes. "Welding Essentials" would be a good place to start.

    Once you've made some decisions with respect to the other posts ahead of mine, get back to us. We're here to help!



    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Doctor D:
    Welcome aboard and hang on for a ride, All the fellows have good points and I agree with Steve a class will help alot, tig is the highest difficulty level of the welding processes. Mike also mentioned mig it is easier to learn and with practice alot of jobs can be done with it. There are all sizes and all types of machines and all types of welding requirements so as Hawk said we need more info, what do you want to weld?

    Peace,

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    Doctor D,

    What thickness materials do you want to weld? Do you want to TIG steel, stainless steel, Aluminum or all these and more. What kind of input power do you have available to power the welder? How much are you willing to spend? Answer these ? and we can suggest some machines that fit the category.


    ArcDawg,

    Don't forget some of the specialty VP TIG units that push the $50,000 and above range.

    Leave a comment:


  • arcdawg
    replied
    or you could start off with a o/a set up and get good with o/a welding and then if you like it move on to a tig..........

    o/a setup is around $600.00

    tig can range from $1000.00 to $5000.00

    dawg

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike W
    replied
    Depending on what you plan on welding, a mig may be a better choice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steved
    replied
    Hey Dr D.

    What I would suggest is that you look into a evening intro to TIG welding course close by before you purchase.

    It will give you a hands on to the TIG process and will introduce you to the concepts.

    Personally, I would look at a Dynasty 200DX but not knowing your application it is difficult to say. The Dynasty is pricey but has some advantages over other machines.

    More information is required like, what are you doing with it, how much are you willing to spend, how dedicated are you.....etc.

    Do you have experience with other welding processes?

    Leave a comment:

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