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  • HAWK
    replied
    fitter108,

    Once you remove it for the torch just run it through the corner cut out in the grinder. This cut out is plenty big and made for notching. It will easily knock off a bad end like you are describing. I use the P II. It is one version smaller than Kevin's P III.

    Here is the information for Diamond Ground if you do not already have it:

    Jim Elizarraz
    Diamond Ground Products, Inc.
    805-498-3837 Ext. # 226
    Fax: 805-498-9347
    www.diamondground.com

    Leave a comment:


  • fitter108
    replied
    grinders

    Originally posted by KB Fabrications
    The PII is $700 and the PIII is $1200. As far as choosing a TG, it really depends on what your needs are. I needed something to grind 1/16", 3/32", and 1/8". I also needed it to grind for two people and for a good portion of the day.

    There are other, less expensive alternatives and if I had more info about your needs I could probably steer you in the right direction. I did a lot of research before I bought the one for my shop and I feel that hands down Diamond Ground offers the best grinder out there. Keep in mind that a dedicated grinder like either one of the DG's WILL save you big time when you factor in individual tungsten life. I ground for years with a bench grinder and a cordless drill and I would be hard pressed to match what my PIII can do in terms of speed, efficiency, and prolonging the life of each tungsten that I sharpen.
    Some of these guys are really beatn up on your grinder tell me if they are wrong. I would like to get a grinder. What if you have a dog knot on your tungsten from dipping it into the puddle, will it fit into the machine. some times they wont even come out of the torch.

    thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • TheRealSpinner
    replied
    aphexafx,

    I too use my welding equipment mostly for art. In the past, I have spent a lot of time building "Chopper" Bicycles. Basically, I buy a cheap bike with 20" wheels and an aditional 24" wheel with a giant tire (for the back). I cut it apart so that I have a bottom bracket with cranks, a headtube with headset and fork and stem, and a set of drop-outs. Then I build a frame and extend the forks. Usually, they take 12-15 hours from start to finish.

    This semester (at school), I am taking a glass (blowing) art class, and the assignment is to build something "structural". Basically, something that goes in your home. I was thinking of building some lamps incorperating a bunch of metal.

    It's nice to see others on this forum using metal for artistic purposes.

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    looks great

    i like the 3d program too . can you get that at any comp. store or did you have to get it off the net.

    Lightwave 3D by NewTek
    is that the hole ball of wax od do you use several programs.?

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    aphexafx,

    I must agree with paulbrown this is very nice work. I do photography as a serious hobby and have all but abandoned film in favor of HQ digital work. I too have a real interest in lighting and spend many hours with Adobe Photoshop playing with light and shadows. Please do post your finished product!

    Leave a comment:


  • paulrbrown
    replied
    aphexafx, very nice, I would love to see the finished project, I am in the process of trying to start a business doing like things, more funky/rustic....as a former pro photographer, I have a great intrest in lighting. Again, keep me informed or drop an email, best to you, Paul Brown

    Leave a comment:


  • aphexafx
    replied
    Originally posted by paulrbrown
    aphexafx, what sort of art are you doing????
    Sorry I missed this post, wasn't ignoring the question. Most of the designs I get to building deal with metal and light. It's just a hobby and a way for me to excuse myself for spending as much as I did on my equipment. And a good way to hone my skills. I usually design my pieces in a commercial 3D rendering system, usually Lightwave 3D by NewTek, so I can see how the light and surface finishes will interact, and then I build them. Here's one I was working on today - this is just a rendering - and I'm hoping to build it in the next couple of weeks. It’s a lamp. Thanks for asking!

    Cheers!
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    aluminum

    if you were doing aluminum on a transformer based welder you would not sharpin the tung as it would need to be balled at the end witch it would do on its own.
    the newer inverters dont use a balled tung. they need a point and a mixed tung. like 1.5% lanthanated for the dynasty series.

    it depends on the welder but i would think it safe to say your father's older unit will take pure tung. balled on the end for aluminum. and pointed for steel. so it depends on the welder and the welded.

    that probly made it werse for ya sorry

    Leave a comment:


  • IBRAILN
    replied
    Well being new to the TIG world- I try to read these threads to learn as much as I can. So in my effort to learn more I am constantly asking stupid questions... and here come another one....--> Why sharpen the W anyways? I do MIG work at home but I have TIG'd at work a few times and I was never told to sharpen anything. Basically they handed me the torch and rod and told me to stick to pieces of AL together. (Which turned out pretty nice if I do say so myself) Is this something that can be explained in lame-mans terms, or is the consinsis that I should "take a class" My Dad just bought a used Miller Tig Unit (I don't know the exact model) so I'm ready to start practicing, the only problem is he lives about an hour away... Any info would be great. Take care, and Happy Holidays.
    IBRAILN

    Leave a comment:


  • drscotch
    replied
    Originally posted by HAWK
    drscotch,

    Thanks. The Al oxide wheel you see on the left is from Lowes. I do not know the grit #. It is not listed on the wheel. It is the most popular replacement wheel. It is the medium grade grit-not real course or fine-maybe #80.

    It is just like the original wheel. Look at some bench grinders in the tool area and compare those to the replacement wheels. Sorry I cannot do any better this evening. I can check next time I am in Lowes-maybe a day or two.

    The diamond wheel is marked HSR diamond wheel company. A friend had this one left over in his warehouse and let me experiment with it. I did a search for Diamond wheels and found this SITE . You might give them a call and see what one costs.

    The diamond wheel really smooths the surface finish, but it is not necessary to have one. Some welding machines have better arc starts with a slightly rough finish on the tungsten.

    I ran across the wheel and tried it as an experiment. I can tell you this: CUT YOUR TUNGSTEN ON THE ALUMINUM OXIDE WHEEL AND THEN POLISH WITH THE DIAMOND WHEEL. If you don't, then you will probably ruin such a fine polishing wheel. This one is not really made for hard cutting.
    Thanks Hawk, I like the idea of starting simple with my tig learning as much as possible. There are enough buttons on the 200DX to keep me busy without worrying about perfect tungsten prep.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    Andy,

    Good eyes

    -ya think.

    Leave a comment:


  • ASKANDY
    replied
    weld

    hey hawk...that weld looks familiar

    Leave a comment:


  • ASKANDY
    replied
    Fun,
    Don't kill yourself over the degree of taper. If you are using a 3/32 tungsten and are welding 1/16th thick material, a longer taper is prefered. If you are welding thicker material, a less angle is needed. After you grind a few, you will get the hang of it quickly and be ably to repeat your grind angles close enough. Now some people like the precision angles and finish that the expensive tungsten grinders give. I get fine results from my grinder set up and unless I did light gauge SS all the time where the high polish finish helps with arc wander, I couldn't justify the cost. When I need a polish type finish, I just use the chem sharp.

    Andy

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    Hawk

    thank's
    ill try the bench grinder i got 2 already. and get some chem sharp also (it's $8.00 here) see what moves me gota do somthing till i could aford the sharpie anyways.
    i'll also compare how my sharpining feels compared to a pre-ground. i supose if i can realy feel the arc differance i'll know i cant sharpin and need a sharpie

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    James,

    Take a good look at the pre-ground tungsten and try to mimic it on a bench grinder. It is helpful to have a good consistent tip, but not a have to. I sharpened on a bench grinder for many years and made many welds without a tungsten grinder.

    Technology is better now and such things as tungsten grinders are available. They are not a necessity! If worse comes to worse and bench grinding is not your thing, then try the Chem Sharp. It works well and is about $10-$15 a jar around here. That is pretty cheap for 400-500 sharpenings.

    I am sorry to have been confusing. Sometimes I ramble on and on ...I was born a rambling man... ....doing the best I can...

    There's that welding music again.

    Leave a comment:

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