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  • i need help on MIG

    Hi, I am a begginner and i was looking at buying a welder. When it says welds 25 Ga. 1/8 in. thickness does that mean I can only weld metals 1/8 in. thick? because $1000.00 is a heck of a lot of money if it only goes thru thin stuff! Please send me any additional info if ther is something u think i need to know at: [email protected]
    D-dawgg
    Canadian eh!
    Canadian beer too strong for ya? Go to the USA! (no offence but american beer tastes like water compared to canadian)

  • #2
    Also...

    by the way the 25 Ga. 1/8 in. thickness of metal is for welding using flux cored wire. would solid wire change the max. thickness that you could weld through? Also, if you have solid wire than can you weld on any thickness? Don't you think its dumb to buy a welder that only goes through 1/8 in. thickness of metal?!?!
    D-dawgg
    Canadian eh!
    Canadian beer too strong for ya? Go to the USA! (no offence but american beer tastes like water compared to canadian)

    Comment


    • #3
      D-Dawgg:
      Welcome aboard, for less than $1000 you can get a mm175 and be able to weld 1/4" thick material. The trick is that as you learn to use the machine the more you can do with it. You can do multi-pass for thicker material. They refer to the machines ability to weld single pass. Click on the products tab at the top of the forum page and look at the mm135 and mm175 they will both be less than a grand and are great machines.

      Good luck,

      Comment


      • #4
        but..

        but why 25 Ga. ? what would happen if you tryed to weld on a peice of 11 Ga. or a peice if metal over the "max" thickness?
        D-dawgg
        Canadian eh!
        Canadian beer too strong for ya? Go to the USA! (no offence but american beer tastes like water compared to canadian)

        Comment


        • #5
          in USD

          the mm 175 IS less than $1000 but thats just for you lucky americans. I an canadian!
          D-dawgg
          Canadian eh!
          Canadian beer too strong for ya? Go to the USA! (no offence but american beer tastes like water compared to canadian)

          Comment


          • #6
            how are we supposed to know that ? you didn't post a location.

            Comment


            • #7
              The Ga of material is thinner the larger the number so 11 ga is thicker than 25 ga. Think of it as the number of slices per inch, so more slices means thinner. The online welding stores have canadian prices listed as well as US. Try www.brwelder.com for a good price and canadian prices. Just give us a little info and we will be glad to help if we can.

              Thanks,

              Comment


              • #8
                ???

                so if you had a peice of 11 Ga. and the welder specs said goes thru 25 Ga. then what would happen if u tryed to weld on the 11 Ga.
                D-dawgg
                Canadian eh!
                Canadian beer too strong for ya? Go to the USA! (no offence but american beer tastes like water compared to canadian)

                Comment


                • #9
                  You can adjust the setting on the machine to weld properly metals between the min. and max thickness. Since 11ga is between 25ga and 1/8 you can weld it with a single pass.
                  Joe
                  [email protected]

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    what welder are u looking at???
                    Lincoln SP170T
                    ESAB 875 Plasma
                    Smith oxy set
                    Dynasty 200DX
                    pulsed mig is next...

                    Long Island Cummins Ram Owners Club

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If your application calls for a hypothetical capacity, lets say 10.

                      and the capacity of the machine is 1 through 20, then of course 10 falls within the range of the machines capability.
                      I'll be honest though.

                      If your running off 120 volts ac wall outlet, single pass solid mig wires will practically be limited to 12 guage. Technically you can weld slightly thicker stuff, but this may require more skill, and prep work.

                      Of course if these are not critical welds, you can certainly even tack 1/8th material together, if good fushion is not terribly critical.

                      If you want to weld thicker than typical sheet metal, anything 10 guage and thicker, or 3/16's and thicker, I recommend something running off 220 volts, like the 175 as mentioned.

                      I picked up a lincoln weldpak 3200 hd, for a steel, basically less than half price, but If I were paying full price, I would never have bought a machine running off 110v, even now, I'm wishing I just would have saved that money towards electrical upgrades to run a 60 amp circuit to an mm251 :-)

                      Best of luck!!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Teeps

                        If your running off 120 volts ac wall outlet, single pass solid mig wires will practically be limited to 12 guage
                        i have to disagree with that. i have the MM135 and it will melt 1/8" like butter. to weld 3/16" would not be a problem.
                        i work mainly with 14-10 gage and almost never go over 4 on V or WS. my biggest concern is being too hot.

                        i dont know anything about your 110V welder but dont judge them all by it.
                        i have welded 1/4" with multy pass and proper pre groving, didnt have it properly tested but i beat it with a hammer back and forth in the vice till the steel broke (the steel failed not my weld)
                        thanks for the help
                        ......or..........
                        hope i helped
                        sigpic
                        feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. [email protected]
                        summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                        JAMES

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I agree with Fun4now, if you are experienced, you can go beyond the limitations of a machine.

                          However, if you are a beginner like me, and follow the directions, lol.
                          The thickest my panel guide shows inside my welder door is 14 guage, this is for both .025 and .030 solid mig wire.

                          I don't do fluxcore :-)

                          I agree though if you have a proper 20 amp electrical circuit supplying your 120 volt welder, and you know what you are doing, you can weld thicker materials. Sometimes, the fusion may not be to your liking, and the appearance, in my experience will not be to your liking.

                          I may not have enough current supplied to my welder, because although I can fuse 1/8th inch steel together, it really is not complete fusion. I would never trust it for structural work. I would easily trust it for a welding cart, and also the tall hydraulic adjustable chair I built for the bar-desk in my basement (and my 200+ lbs carcass).

                          Although I do admit I was using a mere 13 amp extension cord for my welder (sp135T), reason being I see that the wiring going to my detached garage is even thinner so there was no benefit of using a thicker drop cable. This will be changed soon with a 120v/220v 100amp service upgrade to my detached garage, it will be interesting to see if there will be any changes to my li'll welders performance.

                          Another caveat I learned is starting out with metal stock in my "cold" garage, makes it even harder to get proper penetration. Condensation, and cold temperatures will ruin any weld, and limit capability for penetration even further.

                          Having said that, yes, I have welded 1/4", but it was alot of work to prep bevel, and results are less than desirable. You can definately get better results than I have, if you "really" know what you are doing, and have avoided pre-cooled metal, lol, and prepped a properly cleaned/beveled weld joint.

                          Also I was using .025 wire, I know for a fact that .030, or .035 wire would be able to pass more current, and get better penetration. I'm going to try this with .030 L56 I just picked up.

                          If your prepared to deal with additional measures that need to be taken on a 120 volt machine, atleast you will be aware of them in these posts. Again, thicker stuff, may require prep time, multi-passes welds, possibly not enough current to really start a good puddle flowing at the start of the weld to wash out contaminants, generally poor cosmetic appearance, etc, etc. As long as you are aware of this before you jump in with both feet, then go for it!!!!

                          I wish somebody would have smacked me in the head and told me to get a 220 volt welder, I would have upgraded my electrical service much sooner to boot!!!

                          But 110 volt welders certainly have their place, and they are perfect for sheet metal, and thinwall tubing, solid wire single pass work. I will always keep mine for this use.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Teeps

                            i keep a lil propain torch and a bottle of map gas for cold steel. just run the torch over the steel to take the chill out of it befor welding.if its real thick i sometimes go to the map gas, but mostly use the propain (only $3 a bottle)


                            i have a 20A dedicated circuit fo my welder, although it spends a lot of time on the 15A circuit like i said i mostly am at or below 4 on a 1-10 dial and run almost exclusivly .025 solid wire on 11lbs spools with c-25 gass, although i have a few .030 flux core 2lbs spools for ugly out side work
                            thanks for the help
                            ......or..........
                            hope i helped
                            sigpic
                            feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. [email protected]
                            summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                            JAMES

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              teeps. i think that little machine will suprise you once you feed it well. but, of cource, there is no replacement for a larger machine.

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