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Maxstar 150 STL questions

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  • Gaslight
    replied
    Thanks for all the advice. I looked at the parts again in daylight, and they are what I would expect tungsten to look like, except what showed outside of the various safety warnings on the package was the Orange paint, which must have looked like copper in the artificial light. I gather that makes the electrodes ceriated, and not noticeably radioactive.

    I was surprised that each electrode came with a cup, but upon inspection they are all different sizes. I haven't ordered the pedal yet, but I will.

    None of these are what I would call sharp, I guess I will have to get a shaper for that too.

    Leave a comment:


  • wrench3047
    replied
    The other day I went to get a torch for work. The saleman took 30 min to assemble the torch to ensure he had the right parts. I was laughing so hard on the inside I couldn't think of a polite way to tell him he had most of the parts backward.
    he could have used that diagram

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    aphexafx

    great job.
    that's got to be the best representation of a torch assembly i have ever seen. i cant think of any way of making it clearer as to how it works and where things go.
    supper sweet pic. work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sundown
    replied
    Aphexafx, very nice illustrations, esp. the second one.....I understand how everything works myself, but I am sure there are very many who can use the information presented this way. Again, very nice and very helpful.

    Leave a comment:


  • aphexafx
    replied
    Originally posted by Gaslight
    Mine has a bunch of cups, but what I was figuring is tungsten is actualy quite a lot like copper in appearance. Is it just some kind of spacer?
    Gaslight, I don't know your level of understanding about the TIG torch, but this might help you understand what the tungsten looks like and how the upper end of the torch fits together:

    Start with the first, labeled, picture. Functionally, the collet is what the tungsten is inserted into and is what physically grips the tungsten (and transfers electrical power to it).

    The collet is held inside the collet body which screws into the torch body. The collet grips the tungsten when the back cap is screwed into the other side of the torch body and applies pressure to it against the inside front of the collet body.

    Finally, the gas cup screws onto the collet body until it is snug against the front teflon gasket (white ring, not labeled) which provides a gas seal. The little round rubber band on the back cap does this on the other end against the rear teflon gasket (other white ring, also not labeled) and provides a gas seal for the back end.

    The second picture gives you an idea of how the parts interact inside the torch body.

    When your torch is assembled it should look like the last picture. This torch, however, is not ready to weld because the tungsten is not sharpened, as you'll notice (and it's sticking out a bit much, but I wanted it to be visible).

    Hope this helped!
    Attached Files

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  • dyn88
    replied
    great for anger control, a wheelie every time you get angry(a good wheelie always calms my nerves and makes me smile)

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  • aphexafx
    replied
    Originally posted by dyn88
    the guy running it had a, what looked like, tiny foot controller small enough to fit in his mouth. this seemed to work very well.
    I think they make devices like these for disabled people to control their wheelchairs - not a breath controller, but a variable speed controller operated via your bite. But imagine this: when I get angry I tend to clench my teeth, so if someone pissed me off, I'd go flying out the door, across the lawn, and into traffic...or something!

    Anyhow, if you could find a 1k ohm version you could rig it up as a amptrol for your Miller welder.

    Leave a comment:


  • dyn88
    replied
    I once saw a controller on a portable ac tig (thermal arc maybe). the guy running it had a, what looked like, tiny foot controller small enough to fit in his mouth. this seemed to work very well. He was repairing some aluminum boat tops where he needed to around a joint and the figer controller i think would be very difficult to work efficiently.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sundown
    replied
    Originally posted by Dan
    <snip>Anyway in this situation I operated the remote by squeezing it between my thighs. Yes, I got razzed about that Suzanne Summers Thigh Master thing.<snip>
    Dan,

    Next time you do that please have someone take movies I am still LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • Blown S-10
    replied
    Originally posted by Dan
    Anyway in this situation I operated the remote by squeezing it between my thighs.
    **** good idea ! thanx

    Leave a comment:


  • aphexafx
    replied
    Originally posted by Dan
    Yes, I got razzed about that Suzanne Summers Thigh Master thing.
    LOL! Well, that's a very creative way to use the pedal.

    Actually, I would laugh my *** off if someone conveted a Thigh Master into a welding remote. I could be done!

    Leave a comment:


  • Danny
    replied
    Originally posted by aphexafx
    Since your'e starting out I would recomend that you get a pedal controller (if you get a controller) and not a finger controller because the foot controllers are much easier to use. However, this requires that you be sitting at a welding table or similar, so if you plan to do a lot of out of position welding, then the finger controller is the way to go.

    Here are some controllers at Cyberweld: [go!]

    P.S.> fun4now says you need the RFCS-6M and Cyberweld has then for $192.00. Look on eBay first, though, because you might find a good deal.
    It might be called a foot pedal, but if you work in the industrial maintenance field like I do, you will learn very quickly that there are more ways then just using your foot to operate the "foot pedal". About the most amusing way, to the guys that I work with, that i ve operated the remote was the time that I had to lay down in some very tight quarters on a product transfer vibe pan to weld in a new cross member for mounting the motor and vibe assembly. Anyway in this situation I operated the remote by squeezing it between my thighs. Yes, I got razzed about that Suzanne Summers Thigh Master thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sundown
    replied
    I have the 150 STL tig kit that came with the finger controller. After trying to use it for about a week I purchased the foot controller from a local dealer for $175. It is well worth the money and I don't think I will ever use the hand remote, unless I am forced into it by positioning problems. I use 2% thoriated (red stripe) all the time with good results, I use a small 3" portable bench grinder and just do the grinding outside.

    Leave a comment:


  • aphexafx
    replied
    Originally posted by Gaslight
    The TIG kit does not come with a pedal or handle mounted control. Is something of the kind highly recomended? This machine is DC, and can't be used with aluminum, where I suppose the need to start real hot, then back off is part of the territory for such a conductive metal. Is the same true with mild steel, and maybe some SS? Other TIG machines kits like the accutig, or 180 SD come with the pedal, but they do aluminum.
    Since your'e starting out I would recomend that you get a pedal controller (if you get a controller) and not a finger controller because the foot controllers are much easier to use. However, this requires that you be sitting at a welding table or similar, so if you plan to do a lot of out of position welding, then the finger controller is the way to go.

    Here are some controllers at Cyberweld: [go!]

    P.S.> fun4now says you need the RFCS-6M and Cyberweld has then for $192.00. Look on eBay first, though, because you might find a good deal.

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    aphexafx

    Looks like a big oversized pencil lead
    good anser
    as for foot controle you need RFCS-6M remote foot controle #195 183

    Leave a comment:

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