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Hand control ?? hard to use.......

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  • wrench3047
    replied
    Cool, but I guess all new ideas have already been tried. There goes my patent. I don't even have a tig machine yet to try it on, but maybe JEVS or one of the guys that work inside tanks hanging by their third toe on the left foot to weld might want to try it.

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Wrench:
    Yes, it has been done I have a picture of one in my tig book. It is made by J&K welding co. It looks like a clamp on trigger. I'll look for a source and let you know.
    Peace,

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  • wrench3047
    replied
    Does any one make a trigger to mount to the handle? You would have to hold the torch like a MIG gun but if someone with the parts and know how... Maybe it would work better for some people.

    PS I wouldn't mind a finders fee if anyone makes money off the idea

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  • DEA
    replied
    I think the bigest problem with the Miller finger tip controller(I have one)is the cable.It's as stiff as 14-2 house wiring
    Beside that is hard for me to get used to

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  • joebass
    replied
    I usually use the 24D or 24C gloves for TIG and some light MIG. I have also used the leather backed 20 gloves for thicker Aluminum where it gets hot.

    http://www.jtillman.com/search/gloves.html
    Some times if I am feeding a .035 or.045 rod I will use no glove on my feed hand. These gloves won't stand up to heavy abuse and only last me about a month or so, but are really nice to use.

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  • Wheat
    replied
    Jevs,

    Try to keep some gloves on. The light is stronger and the duration is more with Tig welding. I'm not going to preach the dangers of skin cancer....Goat skin gloves get favorable responses. Good luck with your new Tig.

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  • jevs
    replied
    Picked up some thinner gloves, a larger bottle of gas and some stainless rod. I will hopefully get to play some more soon.

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  • ASKANDY
    replied
    I guess I assumed everyone is using thin gloves for TIG work. If you are using a thick glove that is used for MIG or Stick welding, that is way too bulky to handle not only the control but the filler rod also. It would be very hard to roll or feed the filler using thick gloves.

    Keep practicing. Good luck

    Andy

    Leave a comment:


  • GaryM
    replied
    I use my hand control often. When i am inside a tank sometimes laying in a area just big enough for me and the torch that is only way to go.

    It all take lots of practice and more practice.


    Gary

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  • jevs
    replied
    I am getting the hang of it. Here is what I came up with..... Forget bulky welding gloves. Find something thin. Turn the amperage way up on the machine so you dont have to roll the wheel three times to get full current. So far so good using this advice. I was getting decent at it till I ran out of gas

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  • Leons2003
    replied
    I pruchased a thumb control at the time pruchased my mighty Econotig a couple of yrs.ago and I have yet to use the thing, some kind of awkward for me to use either thumb or finger. I know nothing of north/south, east/west or what ever these little honeys are called. Can not see how I can roll the wheel and stay still enough to maintain an arc where it should be, the thing is also I've never watched anyone use one, was suggested by a friend who has been in tiggin numerious yrs. but since has moved out of the area.
    Any help is appreciated and thanks in advance.
    L*S

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  • ASKANDY
    replied
    jevs,
    There is no set way to put that unit on the torch. You can put it anyway you are comfortable. Some put it on the side and use thier thumb, or on top and use a finger. There is no doubt that the hand control is harder for most people to get used to. There's enough stuff to do with your hands AND try to control the machine output without moving the torch. It will take practice and if you are a beginner, it may pay to get a foot control too and get used to the machine first, then move into the hand control.

    Good luck!

    Andy

    Leave a comment:


  • Sundown
    replied
    Same here, my Maxstar came with a hand controller and I tried it for awhile until I just got so frustrated (the wheel on mine is very stiff [normal Y/N ?] and hard to use with gloves on) that I purchased the foot controller. Things are better now and I will go back to learn to use the hand controller, but only after I am confortable with the tig process. Then I think only in places where the use of the foot controller is not possible.

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Using the hand control as an on/off would help and hinder here is whyhelp by only giving you the preset amperagebut that is also the hinderance if you get going in tig and the puddle starts widening you can roll off the amperage slightly until it all starts to move right again then carry on at a new setting slightly off the previous setting. The real answer is practice unfortunatly this is the more difficult process to learn.

    On the miller home page there is a tig manual it may give some hints that I am not aware of, I prefer the foot pedal but when I get better at it I'll switch to a thumb wheel.

    Still learning this myself!!!
    Practice,practice,practice,

    Leave a comment:


  • Ernie Viens
    replied
    controller

    I use the thumb controller for welding chromemolly tubing on aircraft. I have the north south controller and it takes some getting use to but practice makes perfect.Hold the torch with your right hand and scroll the controller with your thumb also you might try to use HF starts it will be much easier to get things going.The other thing that might help is an auto darkening helment that has improved my welding more than anything else.
    Good Luck Ernie

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