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  • Mike W
    replied
    Hank sure is good at cutting things apart.

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  • Andy249
    replied
    Hank,

    Good looking sections, if you have access to some 1200 grit wet and dry and some nitric acid, you should polish and etch them so you can see how deep the weld penetrated. Just a thought!

    Leave a comment:


  • Blown S-10
    replied
    yeah, those look real solid to me. full penetration/fusion. thanx

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Hank:
    Very good!
    I have good feeling about you and your new mm210 friend, a friendship for a long time. Ya think!!!!

    Keep up the good work,

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    S-10,

    Here's the x-sections. Sorry about the lousy flash reflection, but I thnk you can see enough.




    Mike,

    These were cut on that JET 4 x 6 plasma cutter, too!

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • Andy249
    replied
    I think Hank is right on the money here.

    Based on your observation of it happening when welding thicker section it sounds like the weld maybe too cool (most likely happening because your material is acting like a heat sink and whisking away the heat before fusion can take place). This is also one of the typical problems with MIG, hence the reason why here in Oz, MIG does not have a prequalified procedure for welding pressure vessels the way the other processes do. With MIG it is possible to get a decent looking weld but not have achieved full fusion, hence the possibility of ending up with an unreliable weld is quite real.

    When it comes to weaving, I usually only weave on vertical ups. Most of the tags with a weaving capping run at the college where I am doing my cert, don't pass. This is mainly to do with uniformity, undercut etc. etc. I learnt this the hard way! By the way, I'm not trying to say that weaving can't be done, but for me it just makes it harder!

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    Pat,

    25CFH.

    I'm still having problems with this "flashing" thing. From your last description using the solder splash example, you shouldn't see anything like that in a good weld. The edges should be fully fused to the base metal. There may be evidence of undercut on the high side; this ain't no good either! When I use a weave, I pause at the high and low edges (which SHOULD wash the bead nicely into the base metal) and move more quickly accross the center, as described to me my mt mentors on the board, and it works!

    S-10 wants to see a cross section, and so do I. I'll cut 'er up later today and post the pic.

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • tackit
    replied
    I belive Pat is speaking to the toes sticking up at the end of each weave. It's like the weave bead is not hot enough to wash or tie in. I had that happen to me also and I don't like it, I grinded it out and went back to laying in straight stringers.

    Leave a comment:


  • wrench3047
    replied
    Is it like a pop then splatter in the weld puddle. We had something like that happen at work. could peel little bits of filmly junk of the weld area. There was cosmoline(rust preventive) on the metal. we cleaned it better it stopped.

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  • Pat
    replied
    Andy,

    It is not the silica, even though there is the occaisional spots of that. I wish I could get a photo posted of what I am talking about, but that is not possible at this time. I guess maybe I should better try to explain what this stuff is. I call it flash for lack of a better, or proper term. Let's say you were to take a small ladle of fully heated and fluid solder, then dumped it on to a metal surface that you had prepared and heated. At the far outer edges where it may have been cold, a very thin film did not adhere to the metal, but where the solder was intended to go it adhered with no visible defects. This is no big deal, but it seems to happen more often when trying to weld thicker material. This is just one of those things that in all reality does not harm anything, but makes a person wonder why it does, or does not happen.

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  • Andy249
    replied
    Pat,

    This "flashing" you are speaking of wouldn't happen to be chips of silica that have formed after your weld? Should be brownish looking, shiny areas that chip or jump off quite easily and readily leaving shiny weld metal underneath?

    Some wires I have used do it more than others, (due to the alloy composition of the wire I guess) and I find it also varies with the material, surface prep and all that sort of thing. It isn't anything to be all that worried about, and unless it is actually in the weld (an inclusion), it shouldn't affect the integrity of the welded joint.

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  • Pat
    replied
    I ventured out into the shop yesterday and discovered that I had a new roll of Lincoln solid wire same specs as the Thyssen. I forgot that I bought this several months ago when Dan was (and did) straightening me out with another operator error problem. I chunked a couple pieces of 3/8 X 3" flat stock out with the Uni-Hydro, then stuck them together with the MM210. It was about 45 degrees out so it was cooler than when I did the last 3/8 sample, and I did not pre-heat. All in all I ended up with a good weld using the approximate settings Hank used. The bead profile was a little higher than I would have liked it to be, but maybe the temperature played a part in this. The big thing I did notice was that there was no flashing at the edge of the bead using the lincoln wire. Had I been thinking I should have done a coupon first using the Thyssen before I removed it. Maybe tomorrow I will do samples of both. As far as why the Lincoln wire does not leave any flash, I don't know. Both brands are copper coated, and the only difference I can see is they come in different colored boxes.

    Hank,

    What do you have your gas flow rate set at. Mine is at 24.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blown S-10
    replied
    did you cut that in half to check penetration ? pic ? i like the weave myself. it helps my humble 135 heat the area more for better fusion/penetration, and the added filler helps also, imho.

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    Here's my assistant coupon-cutter: my 10-year old grandson, Steve.



    He's quite the shop ddue.

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike W
    replied
    Hmmmn.....looking again......you cut better than I do.

    Leave a comment:

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