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Finally: MM210!!

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Hank:
    Glad to be of help.
    Weld well, weld safe

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    pjs,

    Yeah, that gets it. I was weaving. About an inch before I hit the end, I made a quick run out and then weaved back with my same 1-2 cout on the high sides, and it looks great.

    timw,

    Thanks. I tried pjs's solution before I read your post, but I'm gonna try that later.

    Lovin' it.

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • timw
    replied
    You can pulse the trigger toward the end and fill in the area. Once you get the feel for this you can pulse just enough to let the puddle cool down and still put down a good looking weld.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Hank:
    Right before the end I pick up speed for a slightly flatter weld then roll back when I hit the end. This is with a weave or swirl pattern. Give it a try, on scrap of coarse.
    Practice, Practice,Practice, aint it fun!

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    Couple of things I've never had to deal with 'till now:

    1. Burn-through on3/16"!! (I LOVE it!) Understand how to fix that.

    2. On fillet welds on 3/8", I'm leaving a craterd end similar to a TIG weld where the pedal wasn't backed off. Tried slowing down at the end with poor results (big glob). Any hints?

    Wish I had pictures, but the digital camera was just a little too far to push for...

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    Dan,

    Killer.

    Yeah, my clamp-on's a Fluke. It's a good one, from the "old" days when I still worked for a living!

    I'll have 98/2 one of these days, but right now the prioity is 100% and getting up to speed on the 3035.

    Later, sir!!

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • Danny
    replied
    Originally posted by hankj
    Dan,

    Went out there and cranked it to tap 7 and WFS 65. The power is awesome - I could feel the table vibrating at the short-arc ignition frequency. Had to turn the hat up to shade 11 to see!

    Actually started welding the .1875 teeth to the I-beam (.375) for the "Browns Valley Mini-cutivator" to drag behind the lawn tractor for breaking up the surface of this clay so I can sacatter grass seed in the bare spots in the early spring. The teeth will NOT come off due to weld failure!

    My son is visiting, and I'm gonna get him to take some clamp-on ammeter readings for me while I weld later today. I'm kinda glad that the ammeter was the solution - I know how to work that!!

    I'm convinced that his is all the welder the Gadget Garage will ever need, except for the 180SD next year!

    LOVE my MM210!

    Hank
    Hank,

    Tap#7 and 65 with an .035 and c-25 isn t short circuit transfer. Your in the 24-25 load volt range with an amperge around 210. This is a high end globular transfer. If you had 98/2 available to you these setting would put you into a spray transfer.

    Your clamp meter needs to be able to take DC amp readings to work.

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    Dan,

    Went out there and cranked it to tap 7 and WFS 65. The power is awesome - I could feel the table vibrating at the short-arc ignition frequency. Had to turn the hat up to shade 11 to see!

    Actually started welding the .1875 teeth to the I-beam (.375) for the "Browns Valley Mini-cutivator" to drag behind the lawn tractor for breaking up the surface of this clay so I can sacatter grass seed in the bare spots in the early spring. The teeth will NOT come off due to weld failure!

    My son is visiting, and I'm gonna get him to take some clamp-on ammeter readings for me while I weld later today. I'm kinda glad that the ammeter was the solution - I know how to work that!!

    I'm convinced that his is all the welder the Gadget Garage will ever need, except for the 180SD next year!

    LOVE my MM210!

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • Danny
    replied
    Originally posted by Pat
    Dan,

    You are a detective, and I stand corrected. The Tap 5 wire speed 60 I got from looking at the wrong column of a note pad that I keep for settings I want to remember. It was Tap 3, but the wire speed is set just a tad more than 55. Prior to seeing your last response I was out in the garage blowing all the dust off the 210. While doing this I discovered that when I hooked up the spoogun a few months back, I must have forgotten to tighten up the large nut where the heavy black cables from the regular mig and the spoolgun are fastened. When I slightly bumped the wire from the spoolgun with the air nozzle, I observed that both black cables were loose, and the large nut that clamps them down was less than finger tight. I can't believe I got any spark out of this welder at all. I sure hope I didn't wreck anything. After tightening the cable nut I did not test the welder out because I have some other things I need to get done. Maybe later tomorrow I will take the manual out there and go over everything as if I am putting it together for the first time. Do you know if there is a possibility anything could have been damaged by this nut being loose, and could this be the cause (besides operator error) of any erratic welding behavior. I can't believe I would forget to tighten that nut, and then on top of that supply you with the wrong info to help me out...........sorry. I guess I am just going to have to step back and start focusing on the primary things so the secondary problems don't arrise, or are at least held to a minimum. If there was such a thing as MM210 abuse, I guess I would qualify big time. I have to get my act straightened out. Thanks for the help, and sorry to take up your time.
    Pat, everything should be fine. The only problem you created was a poor electrical connection, which will produce power losses in your output. I imaging the unit will perform quite differently with the connection being tight now. As far as your tap #3 and around 55 settings go, they sure seem like they would be in the same scenario as the 4/60 setting that you mentioned previously. A wire speed setting in the 55-60 range with a .035 solid wire falls in the 180-190 amp range. For short circuit transfer this amperage range needs a load voltage in the 21-22 volt range. To obtain this voltage to amperage ratio requires the use of tap #5. I ran a few experiment last night with .030 and .035 solid wire using c-25 on tap #5. On my unit the suggested door chart settings are off some, more with the .030 then the .035. The suggested .030 door chart setting is 5/70, this produced a load voltage in the 21.4 to 21.6 range, and an amperage in the 165 to 170 range. This voltage value is to high for the amperage so the wire was pinching off pretty large. What i came up with as a much better starting point for my unit was 78 on the wirespeed. At 5/78 with an .030 wire, the unit was outputting a load voltage in the 21.4-21.5 range, and an amperage in the 180-189 range. This voltage to amperage ratio is more idea, and it showed in the arc quality, because the arc was much tighter. 21-22 volts however, is going to produce spatter though, since these voltage values are the upper region of short circuit transfer were the metal transfer is boarding on transitioning into a globular transfer. Anyway, with the .035 wire tap#5 and the suggested wirespeed setting of 55, produced an amperage that falls in the voltage range (21-21.4 volts and 183 - 191 amps) however, the arc was off a little. So, i upped the wire slightly to around 58, which produced better results. this resulted in the unit outputting 20.8-21.4 load volts and an amperage range in the 180 - 190 range. BTW, I understand Miller recommends tap #5 for 3/8" , which i find a little strange since the Millermatic calculator they provide as a reference guide recommends a load voltage in the 21-22 range with an amperage in the 180 - 190 for 1/4". Miller didn t establish this 21-22 volt @ 180-190 amp range, there are several reference materials available with these #'s in them. I started welding in 1988 , and these were the suggested #'s then, so I m wondering what has change, besides marketing hype, to make it so I should be able to use these outputs on thicker material.

    Leave a comment:


  • Danny
    replied
    Originally posted by hankj
    Dan,

    How are you calculating the current vs. wire speed? What numbers are you using?

    My guess: if the machine can run at 700ipm, then each 1/10th of the WFS dial = 70ipm. If .035 = 1.6 amps/ipm, then would a WFS setting of 30 = 3 X 70=210ipm, and thus 210ipm/1.6 amps = ~135amps?

    I'd just like to know...

    Hank
    Hank,

    I obtain my amperage values with an amp meter- see attachment.

    BTW, the wire speed range on the unit is 35-700 IPM. So, the %'s on the dial should be based on 665 IPM of wire being fed. As far as trying to calculate the amperage out mathimatical goes, that doesn t work very well. The meter is the way to go in my opinion.
    Attached Files

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  • Pat
    replied
    Dan,

    You are a detective, and I stand corrected. The Tap 5 wire speed 60 I got from looking at the wrong column of a note pad that I keep for settings I want to remember. It was Tap 3, but the wire speed is set just a tad more than 55. Prior to seeing your last response I was out in the garage blowing all the dust off the 210. While doing this I discovered that when I hooked up the spoogun a few months back, I must have forgotten to tighten up the large nut where the heavy black cables from the regular mig and the spoolgun are fastened. When I slightly bumped the wire from the spoolgun with the air nozzle, I observed that both black cables were loose, and the large nut that clamps them down was less than finger tight. I can't believe I got any spark out of this welder at all. I sure hope I didn't wreck anything. After tightening the cable nut I did not test the welder out because I have some other things I need to get done. Maybe later tomorrow I will take the manual out there and go over everything as if I am putting it together for the first time. Do you know if there is a possibility anything could have been damaged by this nut being loose, and could this be the cause (besides operator error) of any erratic welding behavior. I can't believe I would forget to tighten that nut, and then on top of that supply you with the wrong info to help me out...........sorry. I guess I am just going to have to step back and start focusing on the primary things so the secondary problems don't arrise, or are at least held to a minimum. If there was such a thing as MM210 abuse, I guess I would qualify big time. I have to get my act straightened out. Thanks for the help, and sorry to take up your time.

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    Dan,

    How are you calculating the current vs. wire speed? What numbers are you using?

    My guess: if the machine can run at 700ipm, then each 1/10th of the WFS dial = 70ipm. If .035 = 1.6 amps/ipm, then would a WFS setting of 30 = 3 X 70=210ipm, and thus 210ipm/1.6 amps = ~135amps?

    I'd just like to know...

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • Danny
    replied
    Pat,

    A wire speed setting of 60 sure seems excessively high for tap #4. I probably won 't have time to try these settings out today, but it sure seems like this high of a wire speed setting is going to be to high for the voltage range that tap #4 outputs. With .035 solid wire, 60 on the wire speed is going to be in the 190 amp + range, with this amperage level, you want around 21 volts for short circuit transfer. I know tap #4 isn t capable of outputting these #'s. The door chart settings for 1/4", which are tap #4 and 48 on the wire speed output around 19 load volts and 160 amps. So upping the wire speed to were the unit is outputting 190+ amps on tap #4 is more then likely going to cause the voltage to drop into the 18V range. As i stated above this sure seems low for the wire speed setting. Anyway, I ll try to test these settings to see the actual results. Then pass my opinion of them on to you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pat
    replied
    Hank,

    Yep, like you said there were some .030 tips however I did not try them because I think I know what my spatter and wash problems are stemming from. See below post to Dan,

    Dan,

    I went out and was going to see if I had everything needed to change over to .030 wire. Once I found that I had everything I decided to hold off because I was going to check out my theory about the different hardnesses of the channel. Once I found some good scrap pieces of what I considered hard and soft channel, I welded some 1/2 picket material to them using the .035 wire at tap 4 with a wire speed of about 60. I must admit I did not notice any difference in the amount of spatter or ease ease of getting the puddle to wash into the 1/8" rail on the hard or soft pieces. So after sitting and thinking about it I decided to try welding some more scrap together and pay attention to just how I was performing the weld.

    What I found was that I have not been very consistent on the amount of stick out I have been leaving. I found that with a longer stick out the arc would tend to jump to the picket material. Then keeping the shortest stick out possible I tried 3 more sample welds. These were some of the best welds I have made using this material, and observed that on the third one where I was falling back in to my old habit of not watching the stick out, I got a lot more spatter and felt like I had less control of the puddle. So, here is another example of operator error by not paying attention to what I am doing. I think when you helped me another time on an unrelated project you counseled me on the virtues of having the proper stick out, one would think that it would have sunk in by now. The spatter on the good welds was very minimal, and no where near the amount I was getting before. I am not going to try the .030, but I am going to try to tweek the settings to see if I can get even better results............thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    Thanks, Scott.

    I'll most likely just stay in short circuit most of the time. My needs don't dictate spray now, but down the road, if I need to, I CAN!

    Hank

    Leave a comment:

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