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  • dyn88
    replied
    well said karl

    Leave a comment:


  • kdahm
    replied
    Some free electrical advice....

    worth exactly what you paid for it.

    Having the exact plug rating for the amperage is irrelevant. It is critical, though, that the plug is rated higher than the expected amperage.

    The breaker should have the lowest rating in the system. Always!

    Looking at two examples:

    1. Your coffee maker is busy running all day, and it's a real power hog. It even runs on 230v. You change the plug out to a 50a,230V Nema 6-50 and change the power cord to a #4. The line from the breaker box is a #2. The breaker you select is rated at 10 amps.

    Regardless of how much coffee is made, the breaker will always trip before the rest of the system gets close to melting. You may have spent a lot of money that you didn't need to, but the circuit is safe.

    2. Frank D. Clueless is wiring a Synchro 180 in his garage. He sees that it needs a 70 amp breaker, so he goes to the Orange Store and gets one. The circuit is wired with some 14/3 lying around from a ceiling fan project, and a standard 3 prong 110 volt socket used. There is a spare lamp cord hanging up, so it replaces the original cord and plug. The ground is not connected between the machine and the socket. Of course, it is wired at 230v.

    He starts welding. Several things may, and probably will happen.
    a. He gets the shock of his life when touching the case, because of no ground and poor maintenance.
    b. The lamp cord melts
    c. The plug and socket melt and catch on fire
    d. The wiring between the breaker box ond the socket melt and catches on fire
    e. The new 70 amp breaker does its job nicely and stays closed, because it never sees 70 amps.

    If Frank had used a 15 amp breaker, wired everything at 110 volts, and used a ground between the machine and the plug, he may have been acceptable. Welding performance will not be very good though.

    In other words, use a 50 amp circuit if that is what is cost effective. Do not, however, install a larger breaker without making sure that the wiring and the plug are rated at least as high as the breaker.

    Note: See NEMA standards, the NEC and local codes, and consult a licensed electrician for actual requirements. I am not, nor have I ever been, a professional electrician.

    Karl

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  • INTP
    replied
    I'm running my 180SD on 6/3 wire with a NEMA 6-50 plug/receptacle. The breaker is 50A because that's what I had on hand, but I'll put in a 60A if I need it. Haven't had to yet, and I doubt I will.

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  • hankj
    replied
    The only 3-pole/4-wire 240V NEMA classification available is 14-60(R/P). Unless you really need the 60 amps, I suggest you stay with 50 amp circuits. An alternative is to hard-wire the unit to a disconnect. There is an L6-60(P/R) locking 2-ploe/3-wire setup, and the L14-60(P/R) is the locking equivalent of the 14-60.

    Hank

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  • Blown S-10
    replied
    $79 for a freakin plug

    try googling for electrical supply. i bet you can have one overnighted for a lot less than that.

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  • deepcj7
    replied
    What do you think?

    I found some in a MSC industrial supply catalog. It's a Hubbell 60 amp, 4 wire for single phase (NEMA# 14-60P) at $79.00. Is this what you guys are using? Please feel free to help out a newbie. Thanks

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  • dyn88
    replied
    try an electrical wholesaler. They do make them although you may need to use a three phase plug and receptacle.

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  • Ryphraph
    replied
    I have been trying to find a 60 amp plug set up as well. Forget about Home Depot, the guy looked at me like I was crazy. I may just use a 60 amp a/c quick disconnect and hard wire it.

    Ryph

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  • hankj
    replied
    That 54 amp input draw only occurs when you are welding at 180 amps output. I doubt you will do that very often, if at all. Go with a 50A breaker and 6-50P/R hardware. A 6/3 SO cord will be fine.

    hank

    Leave a comment:


  • deepcj7
    started a topic Help locating parts

    Help locating parts

    I'm trying to wire my new 180 SD, it's rated at 54 amps. Where in the heck do you find a 60 amp plug/receptacle? I tried electrical suppliers and they are talking about pin type receptacles that cost $50 each. I need a NEMA # for plugs and receptacle if anyone can help me out. I could be welding right now if I would just install a 50 amp, you can find those anywhere.
    For 40' of extension cord, 6/3 SO seem to be what most have recommended, how does this sound? The manual recommends #3 for 100' or less. Thanks
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