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  • Cables

    I would like to make up some long cables for my 180 SD and have decided that in order to get around corners and into the driveway I will need 75-100 feet on each lead. I was hoping that somebody could tell me what size cable to use and if I will have any drop in the current at that distance. Thanks for any help.
    KB

  • #2
    Number 2 would likely be plenty,, yes you get some V drop if cables are not big enough. Lower loads also have less drop as do big cables,,, but,, big cables cost more and are heavy. Cables are also duty cycle rated, short cycles can use less cable.

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    • #3
      At 100 feet, #2's would drop around 3.8 volts at 100 amp load. 4/0 will drop only 1.2 volts, but you'll have to hire a guy to pull it around for ya!!

      Hank
      ...from the Gadget Garage
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      • #4
        Go with as heavy a cable that you can pickup/afford! That 100' of cable may be the first 100' of a 400' run someday...

        Bulldog
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        • #5
          Canuck,

          I lean toward the #2 route as it is light, flexible, easy to work, and will handle the Sync 180 output just fine. I have an attic full of 2/0 that is too heavy to drag around except in 50' sections because I don't make the long runs anymore. The load drop hankj mentioned is really nominal. However, like Bulldog said on the big cable, you have it if you need it.

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          • #6
            i am going to go with a long extension cord. then move the machine closer, but this depends on what machine i end up with.

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            • #7
              a long extension cord is the best way to go you could probably use a 3 wire 4 guage SO cable safely with minimal loss unless you max the machine out than you may want to use 2 guage. Remember when using an extension never use it while still coiled up , this can create a large amount of heat, which translates into voltage drop and amperage increase= more heat, and so on. This also causes unwanted magnetic disturbances for you pace maker wearers(you cant be near high freq either)
              Trailblazer 302g
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              • #8
                Extension Cord

                B S-10,
                Just remember that the same applies to input cable, except even more so. The voltage drop on the output side might be acceptable, whereas on the input side, you're gonna be puttin' a strain on the machine. Like tryin' to suck a tennis ball through a garden hose.

                Weld on,
                Alex
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                Alex

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                • #9
                  I was just curious how one comes to the conclusion that a number 4 or even a number 2 power cord is needed for this machine? You could use that on the output side. 3 conductor number 2 would be heavier to carry than the welding leads. At a 100 ft a number 8 would be PLENTY. Look in your manual and see what the wire size calls for. I dont know if t comes with a power cord but if it does I bet its a number 10. A good rule of thumb here is,,, real close to the panel you can use a wire the same size as the cord, add some distance and go up a size. (this doesnt mean you shouldnt look in the manual though),, but it isnt any good if its too heavy to really be portable. Then we didnt mention how much that thing would cost,,, number 2 SO, probably 5 bucks a foot,, ha

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                  • #10
                    extension cord

                    I found the followng link at another welding forum. (shopfloortalk) The poster was Ron Lemke. If you sign in here Ron thanks for the info.

                    http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm

                    Everything you wanted to know about wire and ampacity. Easier than wading through the NEC.


                    moe1942

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                    • #11
                      My vote would be for #1. I know, #2 will do it, I just always lean towards the heavier side. I find #1 cable to be a real manageable weight, and good enough current carrying capacity for the majority of stick and tig welding at 100 ft.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sberry
                        I was just curious how one comes to the conclusion that a number 4 or even a number 2 power cord is needed for this machine? You could use that on the output side. 3 conductor number 2 would be heavier to carry than the welding leads. At a 100 ft a number 8 would be PLENTY. Look in your manual and see what the wire size calls for. I dont know if t comes with a power cord but if it does I bet its a number 10. A good rule of thumb here is,,, real close to the panel you can use a wire the same size as the cord, add some distance and go up a size. (this doesnt mean you shouldnt look in the manual though),, but it isnt any good if its too heavy to really be portable. Then we didnt mention how much that thing would cost,,, number 2 SO, probably 5 bucks a foot,, ha
                        THANK YOU! I was thinking the same thing. I do run a 4/4 SOOW on 1 phase at 100' utilizing the neutral, ground, and 2 hots thus /4. I am pulling 50 amps max from a 200 amp main. The 50 amp breaker is wired with #6 on a 2' run to the Hubbell receptacle. However, I feel sure a #6 would be just fine for this configuration. I just had the 4/4 hanging on the wall and did not want to purchase #6.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for the replys everyone. I do have a long exstension cord but at 250+ pounds it is not very easy to move my machine up and over and down and around things. And if have to go over grass it just sinks in. If have to move the machine I can but thought long leads would be a better route. Having the bigger cable around is also a good consideration. It looks like I will have to give this some more thought.

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                          • #14
                            Yes, number 1 would certainly be better and not terribly heavy and might find some other uses down the road or if you wanted to go farther. Now, back to wire size. I have seen that link that Ron posted and it has its place but isnt particular to welding machines. Art 630 of the NEC addresses them in particular and the NEMA ratings follow that as do the instructions in all the owners manuals. These ratings are for rated output at their max duty cycles. There are some of these machines they go a bit light on for my tastes and I always upsize at least one. A MM251 calls for number 8 although short runs at 230 (not 208) it would run fine on a 10 if not wide open in spray arc. The 251 is a 60% duty cycle machine. The 8 wire I like on this machine. You can run a Stickmate on number 12,@88ft, to light for me though but up to 50 ft or so a 10 doesnt bother me (up one wire size and only 2/3 the distance) as its usually used with 1/8 rods and its duty cycle is short. A number 6 wire is good for 50A,,, at 100% duty cycle, continious use, like a pottery kiln. These welders do not see that kind of use, especially stick machines. It wont hurt to wire a stickmate with number 6, but it doesnt help it much unless the run is long, over 100ft and there wouldnt likely be any noticeable difference on an 8 and only a little on a 10. I am all for upsizing minimums on wires and often do use 6 to recepts but to insist that you must go up 3 or 4 sizes is just absolutely not needed, its expensive and bulky.

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                            • #15
                              Here is something else to consider and it may work or may not,,, but if this was a spot I wanted to get to with the welder often I might consider burying a set of leads. I would take a look at salvage yard and find some used building wire, actually it could even be aluminum, or go right to the electric wholesale house and see what you could find and they wouldnt need to be very deep, or you could even string them thru a basement, put some connectors on, good to go.

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