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  • cnslmva
    replied
    HAWK,
    Yes I use downhill because of the faster travel speeds. Most of my pipewelds are low and medium pressure (15PSI to 150 PSI) steam, water, air, and other commercial/industrial materials in common construction. I've not had the first problem with the procedure. Like you though, I have had to certify both uphill and downhill, 2 to 4 passes 6010 root 7018 fill and cap. Don't use the 7018 everyday though. Most welds are 6010 (Lincoln 6P+) root to cap. ASTM A53b steel isn't that strong!

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  • HAWK
    replied
    Originally posted by cnslmva
    BOILERMAN79,
    You ought to try downhill pipe, I love it compared to uphill! Try 5P+ or 6P+ (Lincoln's Pipeliner series is killer) 1/8" on sched 40 or 80 at 130 amps for root. Get your keyhole formed and let it rip. Its alot quicker than uphill!
    Are you making more passes downhill due to the high heat/ fast travel combination than with uphill? I went for a test once on API5LXXX 1" schedule 40 expecting downhand with a 6010 and came unprepared for the 6010 uphill root, fill, pass on the arc-n-saw. I welded 2 coupons and they passed X-ray test. One pass uphill on 1" was the root and fill. The 6010 cap all it needed. It was 1" gas line.

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  • boilerman79
    replied
    Will give downhill on pipe a try,but on pressure pipe our procedure is all uphill.next time i do some drain pipe or something like a vent line will give it a try and let you know how it turns out.never used 6p rods.lots and lots of 6010 and 7018.took my pipe test a couple years ago,for a job. welded 12 joints of pipe then back to fab.stuff. am starting to do more pipe now.

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  • tackit
    replied
    Welding downhand outside in windy conditions with fast freeze rods can leave pinholes in the weld.

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  • cnslmva
    replied
    BOILERMAN79,
    You ought to try downhill pipe, I love it compared to uphill! Try 5P+ or 6P+ (Lincoln's Pipeliner series is killer) 1/8" on sched 40 or 80 at 130 amps for root. Get your keyhole formed and let it rip. Its alot quicker than uphill!

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  • JOHN1
    replied
    Thanks for the info:

    John

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  • boilerman79
    replied
    also,i have never welded pipe downhill,i know there is a procedure for it[gas lines and oil pipe],we run all up hill welds.6010 will run very well down hill,but it requires a little more heat than going up hill.so make sure you have your heat dialed in on a practice piece before you start you weld.

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  • boilerman79
    replied
    Pipe welding is a different animal than welding two pieces of plate together.If possible take a couple pieces of scrap to practice on and to get your heat right.make first pass with 6010.for thin wall use 3/32 rod start at 50 amps.go up or down as needed.finish with 7018 out of the can[fresh].i welded many a practice coupon before i took my test.[sch.80 8 inch.]LUCKILY i passed on the first test,but only after a lot of practice.[try 7018 3/32 rod at 80 to 85 amps.]good luck.

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  • JOHN1
    replied
    I think it is schedule 40 Pipe, walls are 1/8 or 3/16
    John

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  • fun4now
    replied
    responsibility

    HAWK makes a good point.
    if it disent hold will it leak out and ruin a priceless painting,trash the drywall, or just add some extra water to the front lawn.

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  • fun4now
    replied
    amps ??

    he will need more info to get you a starting point for your amps.
    how thick is the wall of the pipe ??
    practice pice will give you the best amp's anser.
    i would play with a few practice pices of this pipe before you start the job.

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  • JOHN1
    replied
    Tackit:
    Thanks
    This gives me a basic understanding and will work from here.

    What amps do you suggest for both rods you suggested?

    Thanks
    John

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  • tackit
    replied
    If I was doing it I would bevel the ends of the pipe to 30 degrees??? and put a land on the the ends of both pipe a little smaller than the width of a nickel. Use a welding hood's plastic clear lens to set the gap distance, place four good tacks around the joint and then taper grind them and any stops and starts so the root pass will blend together nicely..


    Get the temp so you can push a 1/8 6010 rod down (touching both pipe)into the gap and drag the 1/8 6010 at a speed that just fills the gap without burning away the sides of the pipe, when the heat is right the bead should look flat and just wide enough to cover the open gap without needing to whip the rod. Then power brush the root pass and weld out with 3/32 7018. being careful not to burn through the root pass. Rule of thumb, the cover pass should be dime high and a nickel wide.

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  • JOHN1
    replied
    "Poriousity" (think that is right) is the main concern.

    Can I get as "leak free" with Mig as I can with say an E7018

    Thanks Again

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  • HAWK
    replied
    JOHN1,

    If there is no procedure and "little pressure" is something you are comfortable with assuming responsibility for, then use the procedure and consumable you are most experienced at and comfortable with. Are you better with MIG than other processes? If so, can you MIG the pipe?

    It may be necessary to have some help on this one. I don't know your circumstances.

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