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Hooking Up Millermatic-210 In Garage (Electricity)

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  • HAWK
    replied
    Sberry,

    I like you and Alex understand a supply circuit depends on many things such as, but not limited to: phase, run length, load type, cable type, main supply capacity, grounding considerations, etc. I can certainly understand where the question asker may be overwhelmed by a certain aspect such as cable size or breaker size while neglecting other potentially dangerous variables. All in all posts of this nature should point to the owners manual as well as a qualified electrician.

    Point well made.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    I agree Alex, I ran 6 to my 50A recepts too. Mainly because its what I had when I did it. The runs were so short that I would likely have ran 8 if I had some in hand. I also upsize at least one in most cases. My only point was that is that can sometimes become the only issue and other stuff can get overlooked or it has become an absolute "must" when it isnt. I hear it all the time,, "You can't put less than a 6 on a 50A breaker" I hear that along with "code says so",, mostly followed with "well I heard that" or "my friend the electrician said so" Like I said earlier,, this isnt to anyone in particular,, I just ramble sometimes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Alex
    replied
    Sberry,
    I've read this thread from top to bottom and haven't seen one post that said you HAVE to wire it this way or that way. I certainly NEVER said that anyone HAD to follow my philosophy. It seems that most of us have referred Brad to the owners manual. I would certainly never contradict the manufacturer regarding MINIMUM requirements for powering one of their machines. As regards overkill, the cost of 1 (or even 2) gauge larger wire is minimal in contrast to the possibility of burning down your shop or damaging your machines.

    Weld on,
    Alex

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    I know how to wire it,, but was curious if the original poster of that thread understood.

    Leave a comment:


  • dcsound
    replied
    The 4th wire is not connected. SO cord is generally more available in 4 conductors than 3 conductors. The factory cords for single phase Miller and Lincoln welders have two hot conductors (black and red or two blacks) and a ground conductor (green). There is no neutral (white) connection. This works fine for 220v machinery, but other applications such as stoves, dryers, and situations where 110v is being split from the 220v require the neutral and four prong plug. There is also another version with a three prong plug that has a neutral and no ground, which is no longer code compliant. I will say that this is very confusing. I spent 15 years taking large sound and lighting systems into venues of all sizes, and very few had the power connections wired correctly, even those with house electricians. Somewhere I have a connector chart. I will post it as soon as I can find the file.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    Here is somthing that worries me a bit. This is not to single anyone out, but as an example. "Most of my input cords are 4/4 SO with a max loading of 60 amps." We can get concerned with this conductor size,, is ths cord being installed on a single phase machine? If so does the installer have a grip on the more important issue of proper grounding? These machines use a 3 wire cord. What is being done with the 4th wire in this install?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    I agree about looking at the manuals, I always look. Usually they are NEMA and NEC minimums for these types of machines. I think on the stickmates and thunderbolts the minimums are one size too light and a bit too long, not that it wouldnt work, but you are certainly allowed to upsize. With the MM210 I think the wire size is good if it is shorter than the allowable as the circuit requirements are only 30A for it. Lincoln had a few machines with funny ratings. Some way heavy and some way light. Most of the ratings in the manuals are fine although a bit long for my tastes and an upsize wouldnt hurt. More that is likely a waste. What tends to get under my skin on message boards is when its insised you "have" to do this or that and its a bunch of hearsay at best. A number 6 cord for a thunderbolt, while wont hurt, is totally unnecesary. A number 4 input cord for a machine that has a 60A input requirement isnt going to hurt,,, but,,, it isnt going to help either, no more than a number 8 cord. The only thing it does as you said,, it makes you feel better. When we quote something it should be , what is an adequate, safe and legal install.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Alex
    Personally, (and like everything else I do) I prefer to over-engineer electrical requirements. I've got a MM251 and I've got it wired with 6ga (30' run) on a two-pole 50A breaker with a 50A 3-socket receptacle. I don't ever want to feel my supply wire get hot. My electrical system gets 200A at 240V so the 50A breaker is plenty. Everything runs better when it's not struggling to get the juice it needs. You might try downloading the owners manual from Miller's site for electrical requirements for your MM210.

    Weld on,
    Alex
    [/QUOTE

    Alex,

    That is the only way to go for me-above and beyond the NEC. I just feel safer and know my equipment is happier. Most of my input cords are 4/4 SO with a max loading of 60 amps. My runs are no more than 65'.

    BradJacob,

    Countless posts on this subject throughout the forum: Here goes

    The owners manual will give you all the recommended specs to adequately power the machine at its published rated duty cycle.

    http://millerwelds.com/om/o1325k_mil.pdf

    Start on page 4-11 and scroll through a few pages. It has Miller's data.

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    Brad,

    Is the service panel in your garage? If not, are the house and garage attached? Those points, as Sberry pointed out, determine the correct code requirements for your situation. Let us know, we'll fill in the blanks.

    Be well.

    hank

    Leave a comment:


  • Alex
    replied
    Personally, (and like everything else I do) I prefer to over-engineer electrical requirements. I've got a MM251 and I've got it wired with 6ga (30' run) on a two-pole 50A breaker with a 50A 3-socket receptacle. I don't ever want to feel my supply wire get hot. My electrical system gets 200A at 240V so the 50A breaker is plenty. Everything runs better when it's not struggling to get the juice it needs. You might try downloading the owners manual from Miller's site for electrical requirements for your MM210.

    Weld on,
    Alex

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Oh no! Here we go again!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    timw hit it right on the head. There are only a couple other things not exactly related to the welder. Is this an attatched garage or detatched?

    Leave a comment:


  • dcsound
    replied
    If there is no room in your breaker box, consult an electrician. There are special breakers with two circuits per breaker that may be installed to free up space and save you from installing a larger box, however they cannot be used for all types of circuits, which is why they should be installed by a qualified person. I use a lot of these at work as we are always adding electrical items.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ken
    replied
    I, too, am about to buy an MM210 and was wondering the same thing. I would like to have the MM251, but now we're talking a 60amp breaker.

    What to do for either machine if there's no room in the breaker box?

    Leave a comment:


  • timw
    replied
    For the MM 210 you can use a 30amp breaker. Use # 10 wire for up to 75' run. For the plug you need a 6-50R recepticle. 50R stands for recepticle, 50P is for plug (which comes on welder). You can get these at Lowe's or Home Depot.

    Leave a comment:

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