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A strange thing happened with my dynasty 200dx

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  • A strange thing happened with my dynasty 200dx

    I was doing some HF tig, stopped and when I went to start again I stepped on the pedal and all I got was gas. No spark. Repeated several times, checked all connections and settings. Nothing. Switched to lift-arc and it worked fine. Back to HF and it worked again. Now, I've used this machine all of about 30 minutes to date so I may be missing something here.

  • #2
    Does yours have "points". I've found sticking a feeler guage through my syncro 250 points will make it work consistently again. This is probably some kind of issue but I haven't looked into it.
    Justin Starkey
    Syncrowave 250 TIGRunner
    Miller 210 MIG
    Spectrum 375 Plasma
    Ford and GM Dyno-tuning on the Moblie Dynojet trailer I built.
    VMP Tuning.com

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    • #3
      I haven't looked inside, but since it's an inverter that doesn't sound like something it would have.

      I've had it happen a second time now too. Hope I'm just doing something stupid and I don't have a lemon.

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      • #4
        Hobbyist,

        Sometimes the tungsten can become frosted and will give the symptoms you are describing. When you switched to "Lift-Arc" you probably scratched the frosted tip which allowed the arc to strike. Try scratching the tip of the tungsten on your work piece the next time this happens. Then use the HF to intitiate the arc. Hopefully this will cure the problem.

        Sometimes simple things can cause the problem: Do you have a good ground? Perhaps relocating the ground will help.

        What size tungsten are you using? The machine is set up at the factory to maximize performance using 1/16" and 3/32" tungstens. If you are using a 1/8" tungsten, you may need to change the start amperage and polarity for this particular application.

        If you are using 1/8" tungsten, give me your application. I rarely use anything larger than 3/32" even with high helium content and 275+ amps on the Dynasty 300.

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        • #5
          I'm using a 3/32 tungsten, welding steel, 18ga and 3/16 (not to each other yet). When I get around to sharpening one, I'm going to switch to 1/16 tungsten for the lighter stuff.

          I think my ground is ok; and I don't think it changes between the time it's not working and when it works again, so I don't think that's it.

          The frosting sounds like a possibility. Next time I see it I'll try scratching the tungsten. If that fixes it, what should I do to prevent frosting?

          And if that doesn't do it, I'll try cycling modes on the welder to lift arc and back to HF without actually doing any welding until I'm back in HF mode. If just cycling modes fixes it, I would think that indicates a welder problem.

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          • #6
            Hobbyist,

            Sounds like you are on the right track. If it is frosting, there is really no cure. Sometimes it just happens.

            A different brand of tungsten sometimes helps. I prefer Sylvania or one of the German manufactured brands. I use these to fill in between orders on the custom ground alloys. I do use a tungsten grinder to make consistent tapers and flats, but this does not really affect the frosting unless your taper is really steep.

            If you have a machine problem, warranty will handle it. Miller should ship all warranty parts on this machine the same day as the servicing dealer request unless out of stock. In that case they will be pulled from production and your servicing dealer should have them in 2 days.

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            • #7
              After saying my ground couldn't be it I'm having second thoughts. The table ground is no problem, but the part I was welding may not have been making sufficient contact with the table. Haven't seen it again, but time will tell.

              The tungsten I'm using is a left over thoriated from a tig class I took about five years ago. That can't be helping matters either. Any reason not to use lanthanated on steel? That's all I have that's new, but if it's a problem I'll go shopping again.

              Hawk, I thought I saw a thread where you said you used a chemical sharpener on your tungsten. Have you switched back to grinding?

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              • #8
                Hobbyist,

                The lanthanated is great for steel on the inverter! It is also great for aluminum. I still use the chem-sharp for .020" and .010" tungstens. I have gone to a Diamond Ground Products Piranha series sharpener for consistnecy on the 1/16" and up diameters. For me it makes all the difference.

                http://www.diamondground.com/index-2.html

                Here is link to their web site. Good luck!

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                • #9
                  I've only had this happen on my 180SD when I clamped to the table. I mostly clamp to the part when I can and that does seem to preven the problem. If I do have to put the clamp on the table, I make sure to get a good solid (clamped) connection between the part and the table.

                  This doesn't seem to be a problem with my MIG machine, so I'd gotten used to being able to clamp the table and go...

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                  • #10
                    That tungsten grinder sure looks like it would be handy. But I can't see spending as much for a tungsten grinder as for the welder at this point. Don't know how much the piranha sells for, but if it's priced like the competition it's too much for me at this point.

                    If only I can just stop fouling my tungsten I won't be spending that much time grinding tungsten for the little bit of welding I do.

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                    • #11
                      ars-zone

                      arc-zone has a grinder you might consider for your limited use it was sugjested in an earlyer post it is about $250.00 here is a link to it.they do have the large type too if you want to spend more.

                      http://www.arc-zone.com/catalog/web_...=4126277_96595

                      might be werth a look.
                      happy welding
                      thanks for the help
                      ......or..........
                      hope i helped
                      sigpic
                      feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. [email protected]
                      summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                      JAMES

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Hobbyist
                        That tungsten grinder sure looks like it would be handy. But I can't see spending as much for a tungsten grinder as for the welder at this point. Don't know how much the piranha sells for, but if it's priced like the competition it's too much for me at this point.

                        If only I can just stop fouling my tungsten I won't be spending that much time grinding tungsten for the little bit of welding I do.
                        Hobbyist,

                        I am not advocating you buy a grinder, I am only saying it does a lot for weld consistency. As a hobby welder the price of $600 is a bit extreme. However, if your income depends on it that is a different story. Not only is it consistent it is also quick and time is money.

                        I feel sure your problem is related to the work piece ground or the frosting of the tungsten.

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