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  • Welding with Oxygen/Acetylene

    As I posted earlier I was interested in a Miller Mig, as well as an Oxygen/Acetylene torck kit for cutting. Some of the torch packages say that they may be used for welding also. I don't mean to be ignorant by asking this, but how does one weld with with this type of torch. Do you fuse the metals together with heat, or is a piece of filler metal used, such as what is done with TIG. I had always used this type of torch for cutting only. Thanks for any info.

  • #2
    I've sometimes heard this referred to as "hammer welding". Where you heat both sides of the weld area until they are nearly molten, then hammer them until they fuse together. Filler material can be added as needed but must be at least as hot as the parent metal. Of course, any of the softer metals; copper, brass, bronze can be welded in this manner as well.

    Alex
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    Alex

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    • #3
      Actually, Yes, welding with a torch is very similar to welding with a Tig. It just takes longer. The nice thing is that you can't screw up the electrode by accidently dipping it into the metal.

      Personally, I think that the torch is still a very viable option for welding and still use mine on occasion even though I have the tig...

      Note: Welding with a torch is not hammer welding. Although, you can do hammer welding with a torch....

      Ok, now that I have confused the studio audience, we will return to our normally scheduled commercials...
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      • #4
        dcsound,

        There are welding tips available for the torch handle. You remove the cutting attachment and install a welding tip to weld. The technique is called fusion welding. You can weld with or without filler material, depending on the application.

        Essentially, you make a molten puddle on in the weldment and add filler (welding rod) as needed as you move the puddle along the weldment. Very much like TIG. Advantage: excellent heat control. Disagvantage: slow speed.

        Be well.

        hank
        ...from the Gadget Garage
        Millermatic 210 w/3035, BWE
        Handler 210 w/DP3035
        TA185TSW
        Victor O/A "J" series, SuperRange

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        • #5
          I suppose I should clarify. I've never tried this technique as a butt weld, but I have done some as lap welds. As mentioned, very time consuming.
          Be cool,
          Alex

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          • #6
            Hammer welding is normally done by a blacksmith on a forge. The pieces to be welded; are heated, laid over one another on an anvil, and then the red hot steel - iron is pounded together to form the weld. If I recall, some smiths also used fluxes that were sprinkled on to the joints to improve fusion. Hammer Welding was how welding was done for thousands of years prior to O/A and arc which are little more than 100 years old. Hammer welding today is mostly done for ornamental purposes (iron work)and is very expensive owing to the time and difficulty in executing a good weld compared to using modern methods. An O/A torch could be used as a heat source but I suspect that coal fired forges supply 99% of the heat for hammer welding.

            As for O/A welding, it is way slower than any of the electrical methods. The hand motions are similar to TIG (one hand holds the filler rod the other the torch). O/A has the advantage of portability, just last fall I welded up the tubing for a friend's green house with O/A. Electricty was just not an option. Good Luck.

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            • #7
              I love to O/A weld, I've only tried TIG a couple times but they are simular. I will use O/A for thin stuff like conduit or exhaust tubing. Also for a very small weld on something that the mig would put too much weld on. I've always used a coat hanger for the filler rod. I wouldn't know how to act with a real filler rod. You do have problems with heat distortion if you are welding auto body panels. You need to keep a wet rag close to quench the surounding area to keep it to a minimum.
              You can also use the O/A tip for brazing metals together which is handy for some applications.

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              • #8
                Re: Welding with Oxygen/Acetylene

                Originally posted by dcsound
                As I posted earlier I was interested in a Miller Mig, as well as an Oxygen/Acetylene torck kit for cutting. Some of the torch packages say that they may be used for welding also. I don't mean to be ignorant by asking this, but how does one weld with with this type of torch. Do you fuse the metals together with heat, or is a piece of filler metal used, such as what is done with TIG. I had always used this type of torch for cutting only. Thanks for any info.
                Look at used book web sites for
                "The Oxy-Acetylene Weldor's Handbook" by T.B. Jefferson. Its a pocket sized book that I think is the best source for how to O/A weld. Usually available for $6-10 in good shape. Last edition I have seen was published in the early 70s. O/A will help ou if and when you decide to try TIG.

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                • #9
                  I am new to the world of welding, but the first way to weld i learned was O/A.

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                  • #10
                    O/A first

                    i too first lerned to weld with O/A you can get filler rod and braising rod at any welding store .probly got it where you will get your gass.it will worp thin stuff fast if not carfull but if you get the hag of A/O welding tig will be easyer to pick up when you are ready.i hope to start tig'ing some time in the next two months.O/A is by far the most portable of all welding and i dont think many shops are without it i have plasma to cut and mig to weld but still love my O/A .diferent tips are used for welding and cutting almost all torch kits come with 1 cutting tip and 3 welding tips as a starter package some have a heat tip aswell.make shoure you keep your tips clean, watch for the hole cloging if the center hole on your cutter tip clogs it wont cut had 1 in the shop cuz the owner didnt clean it.
                    good luck and happy welding
                    thanks for the help
                    ......or..........
                    hope i helped
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