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Welding and water??

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    Andy249
    Senior Member

  • Andy249
    replied
    Yeah, just bare in mind the golden rule when it comes to electricity, electricity will always follow the path of least resistance!! If you try and stay dry, have an extra set or two of welding gloves so you can change them when they become to sweaty in hot weather, same goes for your shirts and trousers, and keep away from the electrode/contact tip unless you are changing it. I can still count the number of times I have been zapped on one hand after welding for quite a few years now, and that includes welding inside boats with 4 inches of water on the floor, welding in rain and welding on very very hot days! If you know there is a risk, just slow it down a little, think things through and you'll be a lot safer.

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  • Grumpy
    Senior Member

  • Grumpy
    replied
    If I get this then everyone is suggesting to be thoroughly insulated--like electric company linemen with rubber gloves and insulated sleeves maybe? I know that's probably overkill, huh?

    Stay dry as possible and out of the circuit is that correct?

    Thanks for all the responses; yup, I'll be very careful.

    Grumpy

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  • Alex
    Senior Member

  • Alex
    replied
    Rule #3. Refer to rules #1 and #2.

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  • Paul Seaman
    Senior Member

  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Last year at the track helping another team a 110 volt wire feed got my undivided attention standing in damp grass. The mm210 got me doing some 1" floor plates for my friend in 100 degree weather sweat running off me into my gloves and all of a sudden after about 12 the 13th one BAM. I got weak in the knees and cussed like a sailer, after I figured out where I was.
    Weld safer,please

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  • Andy249
    Senior Member

  • Andy249
    replied
    The only thing I would like to add about being shocked by a MIG welder is when you get a big spatter ball that drops back down the shroud and bridges the gap between the shroud and the contact tip. Then you strike the arc and starting welding, putting your steadying hand on the gooseneck inside a wet, sweaty pair of gloves! Talk about make you rethink where you put the steadying hand!!!!

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  • Tanner
    Senior Member

  • Tanner
    replied
    Originally posted by paulrbrown
    John1, I just remembered a story about my buddy when he was 12 and used his dad's Buzzbox on a bicycle

    That right there makes me cry...maybe because I'm a die-hard biker, and a stick weld on a bike makes me cry. hahah

    I did have a sticking foot pedal once and was always getting high frequency shocks till I figured it out, they are different from the other as they feel like a bee sting, the others make your muscles contract and get sore...hopes this helps, Paul
    Yeah, don't those sting!? Ow, when I was first learning TIG, I got like 3 in a day and lost feeling in my arm!

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  • paulrbrown
    Senior Member

  • paulrbrown
    replied
    John1, I just remembered a story about my buddy when he was 12 and used his dad's Buzzbox on a bicycle, he had a hole in the bottom of his tennis shoe and when he touched the stinger and or bike, he was literaly knocked across the garage, he never welded again...sad, now for me, I had a hole in my jeans at the knee, and kneeled on some sand while welding on my race car, yooowwwweee, just be careful what you lean on and how damp you are, as for mig, have never been shocked, I think the reason mig is more forgiving is the contactor keeps current off the gun while not welding, as for tig, if using a remote pedal or switch, no current while not welding...I did have a sticking foot pedal once and was always getting high frequency shocks till I figured it out, they are different from the other as they feel like a bee sting, the others make your muscles contract and get sore...hopes this helps, Paul

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  • Alex
    Senior Member

  • Alex
    replied
    JOHN1,

    Rule #1. NEVER become a better ground than the item you're welding.

    Rule #2. Anything you can do to promote "circuitus interruptus" with your body, the better. Examples include the most obvious, rubber gloves, rubber soled shoes, a rubber mat to stand on.

    Weld on,
    Alex

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  • JOHN1
    Senior Member

  • JOHN1
    replied
    Dumb question and I should know the answer, but I don't.

    When stick welding, when and how does one get shocked, also can this happen when mig and tig????

    I understand the basics of eletricity, but can someone point out the pro's and con's of what and what not to do?

    Thanks

    Never been shocked, just very lucky I guess (Been in Arizona for the past 15 yrs now in Louisiana)

    If there is a post already let me know which one so not to be redundent.

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  • Alex
    Senior Member

  • Alex
    replied
    Tooo funny, Doc Brown. I used to work in the oilfield many years ago. We welded in ANYTHING, i.e., water, drilling mud. Can't even remember how many times I got zapped. Never any fun, but a job is a job.

    Alex

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  • tackit
    replied
    I've worked for contractors that expected you to weld in the rain and been shocked for doing it, having a wife and kids sometimes makes you do things you otherwise wouldn't do.

    One idiot foreman expected me to stand in a soaking pit filled with wet charcoal and drill a bolt pattern using a Milwaukee 220 volt drill motor.

    Leave a comment:

  • paulrbrown
    Senior Member

  • paulrbrown
    replied
    Hey guy's, one of the things I've gotten ropped into is putting new tounges on Mobile Homes, laying on damp earth with only 12 to 18 inches of space. Let me tell ya, you can become part of the circuit real quick, and using AC even quicker, I found that out the first one I did. Now I carry a big rubber mat, truck floormat, it helps immensly. Welding in the rain for customer who had to 'have it today', I did that too. water running down your neck, gloves soaking wet. I had to disconnect stinger everytime I changed rods because of wet golves, I finally bummed some rubber gloves from them and solved that problem, we were welding steel plates to preform concrete panels 12 by 6 feet. I found out how easy concrete conducts current when wet, if I leaned on the panels supporting the ones being welded, even with leather welding jacket, ZAPPPPP.....needless to say, be careful out there, it only takes a couple hundred miliamps to kill in the right conditions.....my hair does permenantly look Larry Fine from the Stooges or the 'Doc' from Back to the Future......
    Paul 'Doc Brown' Brown

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  • hankj
    Senior Member

  • hankj
    replied
    Grumpy,

    If I recall correctly, that passage was from a totally disgruntled weldor who was completely dis-satisfied with his choice of vocations. I've welded on some ag stuff in less than ideal conditions, but I don't think I'd lay down in a puddle and try to weld anything. Eelctrically, as long as you don't become part of the current path, you'll be OK, but I'd say that you'd be pushing the envelope pretty far, huh??

    Be well.

    hank

    Leave a comment:

  • Grumpy
    Senior Member

  • Grumpy
    started a topic Welding and water??

    Welding and water??

    Everyone. Here's a follow-up to my 'touching welding rod' thread. On another forum a poster said, ". . . I've welded for many crap-hole production jobs . . . and have found that they push me to boredom. . . And I've been there, welding overhead in a coffin, laying in water trying to convince myself it was worth it. . . "

    Now I know that water and electricity don't mix but I'm confused about someone stating he lays in water welding. I'm not trying to belittle the person just trying to conjure up in my mind laying in water welding overhead.

    Safety first.

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