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Wiring service for a new millermatic 210

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  • #31
    The manual is the minimum requirement spec.

    The welder manual lists the minimum spec for receptical and wiring for your welder. So as long as your welder does not draw more than a circuit can provide then you are OK. Electrically, no load (welder) will draw more current than it is rated for. Circuit breakers should be sized for the wire gage and run lenth of the circuit it feeds to protect against a overload on the wire (overheating followed by fire) and receptical. A 60 amp breaker with #6 wire just means that the branch circuit has more capacity to carry current than does one with #10 wire and a 30A breaker. The total capacity of a circuit is its power in watts which is equal to the product of current (amps) and voltage (P = E x I).
    MM251
    Synchrowave 200

    PowerMax380
    Victor O/A
    Century 155GS
    Big Window Elite

    Run silent, run deep

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    • #32
      I ran my Miller thunderbolt off that 30 amp with no probs but I did sell that and I do want to get another one someday for sure.

      So.. 50 amp?

      If I run a 50 amp breaker and the 6 ga wire to go with it to a plug - can I plug a 30 amp plug into it. Meaning are they different plugs? With it only going a foot it's reall no big deal to put a bigger breaker in anticipation of something that maybe draws more someday, but I dunno about running a 30 6 ga lead to my 210. That might be a bit bulky..

      Guess I could always just rewire when the time comes and keep things simple for now with the 30amp breaker and 10/3 romex in the wall with a 30' stranded new plug for my 210.
      WhiteKnuckleMotorsports.net
      --- Defining the fine line between adrenaline and pain ---

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      • #33
        Originally posted by OldNavy
        The welder manual lists the minimum spec for receptical and wiring for your welder. So as long as your welder does not draw more than a circuit can provide then you are OK. Electrically, no load (welder) will draw more current than it is rated for. Circuit breakers should be sized for the wire gage and run lenth of the circuit it feeds to protect against a overload on the wire (overheating followed by fire) and receptical. A 60 amp breaker with #6 wire just means that the branch circuit has more capacity to carry current than does one with #10 wire and a 30A breaker. The total capacity of a circuit is its power in watts which is equal to the product of current (amps) and voltage (P = E x I).

        according to the spec sheet in front of me, at 230V input the amp input is 27, which is less than 30 so I should realistically be ok with 10/3 for THIS welder. (Actually I coulda swore I saw a spec that said 34 or something which could call for a 40 amp).
        WhiteKnuckleMotorsports.net
        --- Defining the fine line between adrenaline and pain ---

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        • #34
          Run an 8 wire, put a 50A breaker on it and its good to go for all of the 50A machines, thunderbolt too. The Tbolt and the 210 use the same plug. You can use a 10/3 for extension cord without problem on this circuit for welding machines. Welding machine requirements are different than "general use circuit" requirements or continious use circuits.

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          • #35
            You can put a receptical that is rated lower than the breaker and wiring on a circuit. The recept has a current rating and thus a blade size and pattern that is standardized for the current rating of the recept. There are even different recpticals 50A ciruits depending upon usage. You will notice that you will find a differen plug pattern for dryers than for welder recepticals. You can install the 6-50P welder receptical and then build a 50A to 30A pigtail to adapt the welder. I did that for my plasma cutter although for a different reason in that case it was a 230V 20A lock plug to a 120/230V blade receptical so that I did not have to change the plasma cutter's cord and still keep its 120V/230V capability. Photos show the 50A receptical on its #6 hardwired extension cord as well as the 20A locking recept. Behind the plasma cutter is the 10 foot #6 extension cord to adapt it to the 230V recept.
            Attached Files
            MM251
            Synchrowave 200

            PowerMax380
            Victor O/A
            Century 155GS
            Big Window Elite

            Run silent, run deep

            Comment


            • #36
              well this is all to complicated

              I just bought 40' of stranded wire 10/3 for re-wiring my welder, and a plug. Is there a problem rewiring my welder warranty wise? I haven't even turned it on

              I figured it was safer to have it hard wired than an extension cord and for the most part I will always need the length - or atleast more than what comes with it.

              I'll still need to get a breaker and outlet for the wall, I actaully got 2' of 10/3 romex for that but I haven't decided what I want to do there. My fear is running the 10/3 wire on the welder behind a 6/3 or 8/3 with a 50 amp breaker makes the wire on my welder the weak link. That's not a good idea but then maybe the welder has it's own built in protection that is the weak link?
              WhiteKnuckleMotorsports.net
              --- Defining the fine line between adrenaline and pain ---

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Sberry
                Run an 8 wire, put a 50A breaker on it and its good to go for all of the 50A machines, thunderbolt too. The Tbolt and the 210 use the same plug. You can use a 10/3 for extension cord without problem on this circuit for welding machines. Welding machine requirements are different than "general use circuit" requirements or continious use circuits.
                Sounds like a plan, but once again something tells me a 50 amp breaker and a 10 gauge lead from the welder is a bad idea - gonna fry the wire before the breaker flips?
                WhiteKnuckleMotorsports.net
                --- Defining the fine line between adrenaline and pain ---

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                • #38
                  Brandon,

                  You have to figure in the duty cycle of the welder. 50amp breaker provides short circuit protection and 10/3 cord is enough to handle the duty cycle of the welder without burning up the cord!
                  Bob Sigmon
                  ___________________
                  Dynasty 200DX w/ Coolmate 3
                  Miller Passport
                  LMSW-52T Spot Welder
                  A/O Setup with Meco Midget
                  Miller Big Window Elite
                  Quincy QT-5HD

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                  • #39
                    in that case I'll go ahead and stick the 50 amp breaker in the wall (8/3 wire or 6/3?)- just for future upgradability or whatever. I've only got a 60 amp breaker going to the box itself from my main box.
                    WhiteKnuckleMotorsports.net
                    --- Defining the fine line between adrenaline and pain ---

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                    • #40
                      For welding machines 8 or 6 is ok on a 50, I actually like 8 as I think most people do a better job of wiring up the recept because the wire isnt so stiff. Like Bob said, the limiting factor is going to be the applied load, the welder cant draw enough for long enough to overheat the number 10, you wont fry the wire, the breaker will trip in the event of a short which would be hundreds of amps.
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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Brandon MILLER
                        well this is all to complicated
                        I figured it was safer to have it hard wired than an extension cord and for the most part I will always need the length - or atleast more than what comes with it. I'll still need to get a breaker and outlet for the wall, I actaully got 2' of 10/3 romex for that but I haven't decided what I want to do there. My fear is running the 10/3 wire on the welder behind a 6/3 or 8/3 with a 50 amp breaker makes the wire on my welder the weak link. That's not a good idea but then maybe the welder has it's own built in protection that is the weak link?
                        A well constructed extension cord of heavy duty components should not be a problem or safety hazard. I can tell you from firsthand experience that even a continuous 50A load will not melt 10/3 SO cord. Make it a little warm, yes, melt it or catch it on fire, no. 10/3 romex is not as thermally tolerant. Better to use at least 8/3 to wire the wall plug.

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                        • #42
                          wired up my new power cord last night, took a little while but I'm happy with it. 40' of 10/3 to replace the short stock 12/3 cord..
                          WhiteKnuckleMotorsports.net
                          --- Defining the fine line between adrenaline and pain ---

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