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Fabricateing a battery relocation box

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  • ASKANDY
    replied
    Most of the ones I build are .095 but have done special requests down to .052 which I think is too thin but they like the weight savings. Any ounces in this business is like gold. For you, I wouldn't go under the .095 thickness as it will be tough to MIG weld. I TIG all our boxes so thinner materials aren't a problem.

    Have fun!

    A-

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  • SoCalTA
    replied
    Andy,

    Thank you VERY much for taking the time to send me the pics. The rules don't specify thickness only that it needs to be covered. I think it has to do with the fact that we either have stock gas tanks in stock location or the fuel cell would end up being right next to the where we would relocate the battery.

    What thickness are you using?

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  • ASKANDY
    replied
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  • ASKANDY
    replied
    Does it have to be covered and made from that thick of material? I make our boxes for the race cars we build from .083-.095 depending on how light the customer wants. We run a spill proof battery and no cover.
    (see attached)
    Your mounting area may be different but running the cables is no problem here.

    Andy-
    Attached Files

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  • SoCalTA
    replied
    Hawk,

    That part worries me but thats why I posed the question here. Hoping to see what people have done (those that have made one). I had planned on making it large enough to line the inside with a thin layer or rubber. I have seen them in Jegs or Summit racing catalogs. I do however thank you for your words and concern.

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  • HAWK
    replied
    SoCalTA,

    Please watch for battery shorting in a conductive box. My son welded a perfectly good Snap On 7/16" wrench to a car battery when he was 5 years old. No damage except wrench replacement. Just an extra word of caution.

    Leave a comment:


  • SoCalTA
    replied
    PJS .... good info .... Knowing the way I am if I managed to get a good bead I would have been driven to just go and go and go. I will take your approach.

    Timw .. believe me I have thought of just going and buying one but I learn best when I have a project to complete ...plus .. half the fun is making the stuff ... especially when there is a nice new welder in my garage 8-)

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  • timw
    replied
    I would suggest going to the local marine/boat store and purchase a box for a boat battery. They come with a lid (Coast Guard Reg- has to be covered) and has openings for cables. The marine box is plastic and will work much better from a corrosion and possibly short circut stand point. You could fab a bracket for it to fit in though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    SoCalTA:
    I would start by tacking the whole thing together then check for square and that diagonally it measures the same from oposite corners. After its square check fit and start the final welding.

    The welding is going to be the important part don't weld full lengths just partials at a time then move to the same weld on the opposite corner and move the heat around to avoid warpage.

    Good luck,

    Leave a comment:


  • SoCalTA
    started a topic Fabricateing a battery relocation box

    Fabricateing a battery relocation box

    OK I know I am working ahead of the curve since I have yet to weld a respectable bead using AL and my MM210 but here goes.

    I was wondering if anyone here has any pointers, diagrams, methods, etc. regarding the construction of a battery relocation box. The 1/8 AL that I have been practicing on was going to make up the box (sides, bottom and lid) as well as the base to hold it down. I will drill out two openings to pass through the cables and another as a vent. Its going into my 87 IROC road racer.

    What say ye!!!
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