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First TIG with Dynasty 200DX

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  • First TIG with Dynasty 200DX

    I finally got a #9 tig torch for the new Dynasty( the #20 water cooler is nor here yet) and tried my luck at TIG. I have played with an Econotig at work and done a good bit of gas welding. First I tried aome .063 mild steel and the weld looked good to me. ( I may not know a good one if I see it). Then I tried some .080 aluminum 5052 and it looked better than expected. Then I tried .040 3003 at 40 amps, 1 pulse per second and everything factory set ( i didnot want to change too many things) I think the weld was pretty good for me. I am enclosing a photo and would like some of you Pros to offer suggestions I will also attach a photo of the rig on the cart with the tank and cooler. I may have to put the photo in a reply

    I LOVE THIS MACHINE !!!!

    Thanks,

    collier
    Attached Files

  • #2
    hey, did you delete your old post on the same subject? I posted a reply on how to post a picture, then it was gone, and I was very confused. Nice weld, looks MUCH better than my tig welds!
    -Tanner

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    • #3
      Collier,

      Not bad. I think you are pausing way too long when you add filler and that is giving you the solid bead. Your amperage, EN balance, and arc frequency look good! Try this: Repeat your amperage, EN, and frequency settings. Turn the pulse off. Once you get a puddle add filler and move the torch forward, add filler and move forward. Move your torch in a straight line, I think you are from the picture, and move forward each time you add filler. If your heat is right you should not have to stay in the same place after adding filler to melt it in. The other thing I see is your torch angle may be too shallow. Set the torch so the back cap is leaning backtoward the start of your weld. Try to stay about 75 degrees above the horizontal on your left to right travel and keep your side to side angle straight up and down on a 90 for running straight beads in position. I bet you see immediate improvement! You have what it takes. You just need a few pointers and some practice!

      Comment


      • #4
        happy 4 you and you're 200DX cant wait till i get a tig to play with.
        hope you have many happy welds
        james
        thanks for the help
        ......or..........
        hope i helped
        sigpic
        feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. [email protected]
        summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
        JAMES

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        • #5
          Here is the photo of the rig on the cart with the cooler. HAWK, thanks for the tips, I will try them today.

          collier
          Attached Files

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          • #6
            Collier,

            Nice set up. Looks good. I really like the blue cart!

            Comment


            • #7
              HAWK

              Hawk,
              I have been working on the welds, I tried what you suggested and the welds look much better. it looks like fish scales instead of being so smooth. The welds on .080 look better than the .040 but both are better than the one in the photo. How far do you move forward after the addition of filler? I have been trying to go about 1/2 the puddle diameter. I will try to post a photo of the welds tomorrow on this same column and would appreciate comments. I know a welder that used to build radiators for Griffin before he opened his own welding shop and he is going to come over and give me some pointers. He really wants to try the Dynasty.

              Thanks,

              collier

              Comment


              • #8
                collier,

                The spacing is up to you. The closer your freeze lines the stronger the weld. A good weld can look like a close stack of dimes or almost continuous like the filler is being added as fast as the torch can move. I do this quite often on structural welds. Some of the prettiest welds are stacked dimes, but not close together. These welds are appealing to the eye, buy lack any real structural strength. You will fine them on radiators, valve covers, rear spoilers and other non critical areas of race cars. They look good, but do not have to take any real stress and strain. They are for show. The closer frozen puddles may not look as good, but are typically stronger.

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                • #9
                  HAWK

                  I am attaching a photo of progress with aluminum. This was at 40 Amps no pulse 120 Hz 75%EN The metal was .040 3003 and the rod was 1/16 4043. Does this look any better and what changes do I need to make.

                  Thanks,

                  collier
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    collier,

                    Definite improvement! I think at this point practice will help as much as anything. The rhythm is not real steady, but coming along nicely. Practice running some more beads and concentrate on the puddle, add filler, move, add filler, and repeat. Be more deliberate in adding the filler. You may want to turn the amperage up a little bit: 45 amps. See how that does. Good job. Are you cleaning your base metal and filler rod?

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                    • #11
                      HAWK

                      I am cleaning the base metal with a die grinder with a scotchbrite disc and wiping with acetone. The rod I am pulling through a scotchbrite pad in my hand several times. I will continue to practice on both .080 and .040 material. I sometimes just run a bead on a strip of metal instead of joining two pieces. These seem better because it is easier and I can concentrate on the filler. Is this good practice or should I be joining two pieces?


                      Thanks,

                      collier

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        collier,

                        Start with beads on a single sheet of aluminum, then try some butt welds. From there go to lap welds and fillet welds. You will find a longer tungsten stickout works better on the fillet welds. Try them all. I listed them in order of easiest to hardest for most people when learning. You may fine the laps or fillets are easier than the the butt welds.

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