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Electric Gas Valve

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  • hankj
    replied
    Heti,

    My wife liked your answer best.

    Be well.

    hankj

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Heiti:

    Thanks, I hope things are better in your world also, we all have much to pray about.

    Bless you and yours,

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    pjseaman
    mine went through some pretty dicey times with her health in the last few months... am blessed to have her.. send our prayers that yours does as well
    Bless
    Heiti

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Guys
    guess my point was... that we as craftsmen are responsible for our actions.... let us not let ourselves Dumb Down to the point where the simplest part of our craft and art is beyond our grasp and control..... if that.. then let the machine drink the beer and drive the hotrod as well.... in short... how lazy can we be?????
    Heiti

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Thanks Heiti, perspective is everything and your right about kissing the honey goodnight, mine has had a few really bad days lately and good days seem hard to find. I am looking foreward to the cancer treatments finish in five monthes, seems so far away but its closer than it was 7 monthes ago.

    Peace,

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Guys
    what Hawk and I discussed were high frequency pwm computer controlled proportioning solenoid valves to make optimized argon / helium gas mixes for tig-ing aluminum and other non ferrous metals.. in this case you guys have heard my rant before about letting the machine take control of the man/machine interface.... simplest answer... is to turn off the tank valve before you leave the shop for the evening... cost Zero.. result Priceless........ (kissing your honey as you roll into bed.. will also help your longtime happiness... no computer required)
    Heiti

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  • hankj
    replied
    Nah. You gotta have a Kenbeam (or is it Sunmore?) for that.

    Be well.

    hankj

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  • ASKANDY
    replied
    Yea, but can you make it do my laundry and fix me breakfast too

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  • hankj
    replied
    Another thought:

    Use a low-pressure, low-voltage SPST switch on the discharge side of the flowmeter. Hook up an alarm lamp and mount it near your shop/garage door. Run some bell wire to a door-bell type trnasformer mounted conveniently, throught the swithch to the lamp, and Viola! - can't leave with the light on!!

    Be well.

    hankj

    Leave a comment:


  • ASKANDY
    replied
    PJS,

    To put it simply, the cost would not be justified to add your gas feature to the product directly. It may work as an add-on or option but in this price competetive market, it would price us out of the ballpark compaired to our competitors. Most people wouldn't want to pay the extra money for a little convenience.
    Good idea though.

    A-

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    pj,

    Even though most of my welding gases are inert I would still rather have the bottle cylinder valves off when not in use. You have a good idea in the on/off mix, etc., and I'd like to have access to such. I am sure I would still crank the tank valves to the off position when I finished.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    I do agree about the OAW fuel gasses but the system I've seen for nitrous oxide would be convienient and I would hate to have a leak and lose expensive gas or ruin a regulator by leaving pressure on it so I will probably still turn off the bottles. Rube was a nut not average typical and normal like me, humble too ,
    Peace

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    timw,

    I was not ignoring your Rube Goldberg comment. I just rolled out of the bed on a very lazy rainy Sunday morning. The coffee is still brewing. You are correct. That is a very hard way to go about the easy task of turning on a bottle. As Rube much anticipated I too sometimes prefer the hard way to accomplish a task. Why? Human nature. I think it's the thought that it can be done with such an imaginative "invention".

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    timw,

    I have always turned my bottles off when leaving the shop or finishing a road job. If I do hook up the valve it will be just to play and test. I could not sleep if I left any gas bottles turned.

    Leave a comment:


  • timw
    replied
    Rube Goldberg would be proud of you guys. I personally wouldn't want to leave the bottle turned on. Next thing you know you will forget to turn off the Oxy/Act bottles and a leak there is dangerous. Turning bottles off is a good habit to get into. I've learned to check them when ever I pass by, I even check them in other peoples shop, I will mention that they are on if I find them. I had the regulator fail that came with my MM 210. I turned the bottle on and tried to weld and I had no gas. I checked the bottle and the low side gage was pinned. I put on a flow meter that I had and was back in the game. The over pressure must have jammed the gas valve because I got no gas with the high pressure.

    Leave a comment:

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