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  • High Freq. interference.

    So yesterday I managed to get an awsome deal on a syn. 180. The machine sells for about $2700 in canada and I got for $1975!( I think thats what it's worth down there!) I will be able to pick up in a week from now so I have not completed the paperwork on it. So my question is this. How much will the high freq. interfere with electronics and so on or should I be worried at all. Any would be great thanks!

  • #2
    Canuck:
    In school working in a booth next to a guy using Hi frequency my walkman radio was static only, but my mini disc player worked. Fire it up and look around to see what it fools with. I would only worry if you had a pacemaker in your chest. Congrats on the new machine let us know how its going OK!

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    • #3
      Canuck,

      Hi freq is a potential problem period. Grounding your Syncro frame to an earth ground is your best bet. I have an 8' galvanized electrician's ground rod driven into the earth near my shop. I use it to ground the machine frame for all continuous HF producing circuits. I don't frame ground my Dynasty because it uses HF to start, but is not continuous due to the advanced square wave arc design. Better safe than sorry.

      It is a rare occurence, but injury and even death have resulted from improper installation of high frequency equipment!

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      • #4
        HiFreq

        Canuck
        there is a pretty good diagram in the manual for grounding and shielding to minimize interference and extranious radiation from HF.. if you follow those guidelines... you should be fine.. that being said... if you do experience problems after compliance with the guidelines.. there are some inexpensive techniques to further attenuate radiation... let us know how it goes... and we will go from there...
        Hope this helps
        Heiti
        .

        *******************************************
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        • #5
          Thanks for all the help! I don't now how I can wait another week to get my welding machine! I think I have a two page list of all the projects I can do now it really is a dream come true!

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          • #6
            I too have a Synchrowave 180 SD. I am in the process of getting power to my garage so I can run it.

            I have some questions about the High Frequeny Interference.

            1. The warnings say not to use it within 50' of a powerline. What kind of problems would I have as the power lines are above my garage (about 30' away)?

            2. I am running a ground rod for my sub-panel. Would it be OK to ground the frame of the unit to that or would I need a seperate one?

            3. Does everything made of metal in the area need to have a ground?

            Thanks...Ryph

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            • #7
              The only problem I've had with HF on my 180 is that it used to trip the GFCI that my radio was plugged into, so whenever I welded, I lost my tunes. I swapped the GFCI with a better one and that problem stopped. I haven't noticed anything else, though. I did ask my wife if she noticed anything and she said that she did not. I think the manual is just a CYA for the mfg.

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              • #8
                We have lots of computers here and the neighbor is a HAM radio dude, everyone says they cannot tell that I am welding, even though the computer is directly above the shop in a wood frame building...now the noise at 300 amps and pulsing with AC is something else, kinda like a .22 cal machine gun.....Paul
                More Spark Today Pleasesigpic

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                • #9
                  Hf Info

                  Most of the time, HF is not a problem but in some cases where old wire and poor grounding occur, HF is left to wander around to interfere with anything electronic. We have HF bypass capacitors in the unit to shield the internal electronics but as HF radiates to the torch, the problem is greater. The Sync 180 does have true HF and it does stay on all the time when doing AC aluminum. Only in steel does it turn off after starting. This is not the case for the inverters which have a modified HF and is only used for starting in both DC and AC.
                  Grounding the case of the unit to a ground rod is a great way to dispose of unwanted HF. You can also ground the work bench too. The reason we say 50ft is because if there is a bad grounding situation, the HF can be imposed on and transmitted along the power line to cause issues elsewhere. If you have any quality grounding within your shop or present wiring, you should be fine.

                  Good luck.

                  Andy

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for all of the info!

                    Ryph

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ASKANDY View Post
                      Most of the time, HF is not a problem but in some cases where old wire and poor grounding occur, HF is left to wander around to interfere with anything electronic. We have HF bypass capacitors in the unit to shield the internal electronics but as HF radiates to the torch, the problem is greater. The Sync 180 does have true HF and it does stay on all the time when doing AC aluminum. Only in steel does it turn off after starting. This is not the case for the inverters which have a modified HF and is only used for starting in both DC and AC.
                      Grounding the case of the unit to a ground rod is a great way to dispose of unwanted HF. You can also ground the work bench too. The reason we say 50ft is because if there is a bad grounding situation, the HF can be imposed on and transmitted along the power line to cause issues elsewhere. If you have any quality grounding within your shop or present wiring, you should be fine.

                      Good luck.

                      Andy
                      My older Syncrowave 250 is just on the other side of a cloth weld partition from my Bridgeport mill and digital readout. I'm within 20 feet of a server, router, and digitally controlled solar inverter. My biggest concern is burning out the readout (not cheap!) and taking out firmware. I'm grounding the welder case and will be putting in a heavy duty circuit suppressor in the weld line. Any thoughts?

                      How well does the Syncrowave 250 work with "intentional" scratch start?

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