Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

millermatic questions

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ASKANDY
    replied
    FYI

    The MM135 went to infinite voltage settings 'cause the competition was doing it and using it as a selling point against us. Since we own Hobart, we thought we might as well leave a tap unit in that line as an alternative and switch our blue units from tap to variable. We did keep the wire tracking feature that made the small Millermatics easy to use for the beginner and yet gave the hobby guy that thinks he needs incremental voltage adjustment the machine he wants.

    FYI-2
    There is a large request from the field for a solid state unit like the MM251 in a MM210 size, so I wouldn't be surprised if we came out with a SCR version of the 210.

    A-

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Hawk I love my 210 but if there are hand outs I'd take a vintage. It is basically the same machine just higher amperage and slightly more duty cycle to boot. You gotta love commonality in the design so you can go from one to the other and they work the same.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    JWELD,

    Hang on to your Vintage unless you just don't like it. I will gladly take a hand-me-down! Ha!

    Leave a comment:


  • moe1942
    replied
    Vintage

    JWELD,

    If you know someone who wants one AAA welding supply has the Vintage for $1832.10.


    moe1942

    Leave a comment:


  • JWELD
    Guest replied
    Still love my Vintage, guess it would still be a big seller if it were available as is the MM 210.

    Briefly, what are the differences between the Vintage and MM 210?

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    cope,

    I was not thinking back that far. Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • cope
    replied
    Originally posted by HAWK
    Brian,

    After reading your post again I missed the tapped control versus infinite adjustment. The taps are nice: Just set your voltage and tune in your wire speed. Why is the intro machine, the MM135, infinite rather than tapped? I am not sure, but think it would be very hard to multi-tap such a physically small transformer. That is all the taps represent is a "tapped" point on the transformer windings. The longer the wire distance to a tap the less the voltage supplied off the tap. I have used tapped and infinite controls and like then equally well. It's just a matter of preference.
    The 130 and 130Xp were tapped. There was a thread a year or so ago at the Hobart site and a Miller tech gave the reason for the change, but I don't remember the reason. If you want a tapped 135 look at the Hobart.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    Brian,

    After reading your post again I missed the tapped control versus infinite adjustment. The taps are nice: Just set your voltage and tune in your wire speed. Why is the intro machine, the MM135, infinite rather than tapped? I am not sure, but think it would be very hard to multi-tap such a physically small transformer. That is all the taps represent is a "tapped" point on the transformer windings. The longer the wire distance to a tap the less the voltage supplied off the tap. I have used tapped and infinite controls and like then equally well. It's just a matter of preference.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    Brian,

    The "Active Arc Stabilizer basically cleans up the rectified output giving you a smoother softer arc. Unless you have spent time with a number of different type GMAW machines such as plain arc rectification, SCR output, and high tech variable inductance arc control inverters I doubt you will notice the difference.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Brian:
    I have the mm210 w/spoolgun that I bought as a package deal and this is first rate equipment. I looked seriously at the mm251 and it had reallynice features but the basic machine with less technology was a more bang for the buck situation. I have mentioned before that I have used the invision 354mp and for training or high production situations the higher tech is great but for most of what do it does fantastic. It would be nice to have a tig machine but for steel and medium weight aluminum its perfect. If I were in a production environment it might be nice for the harder working machine but for 95% of the work the 210 will do nicely. As HAWK said the 210 doesn't get quite enough credit.

    If you ask a few of the guys on the forum they will verify the qualities of the 210 not to knock the 251 but I enjoy mine very much as do the other guys.

    Peace,

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    Brian,

    The 210 and 251 are both fine machines. The 210 is way underated and will do most anything you need unless you are in an application requiring the higher amperage duty cycle of the 251. I don't think you will see much difference in the machine's arc unless you need more than 200 amps of MIG machine.

    If you need the extra money to go for a stick/generator machine, then what about a Trailblazer 301G and an 8 or 12RC wire feeder and have only one machine for mig, stick and tig? I ran one on my mobile rig and also used it at home.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian
    Guest started a topic millermatic questions

    millermatic questions

    I have a few questions on the differences between the millmatic 210 and 251. Why does the 210 use taps when the rest of the millermatic line down to the 135 all use infinite voltage control. If taps were easier for a newbie why do the intro models have infinite voltage. Is the active arc stablizer on the 251 something I will notice a diference on when welding over the 210 without? I am asking these questions because the 500.00 savings from buying a 210 over a 251 would go towards a good used stick/generator to do anything real heavy. If there is any difference between the two that I have missed other than the amperage please let me know.

    Thanks Brian
Working...
X