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  • paulrbrown
    replied
    klsm54, thanks, sounds like the body builders know what they are up to. I am still going to experiment and will post something when I find out, should be a few days...thanks again, Paul Brown

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  • klsm54
    replied
    I know a welder who ran a Profax spoolgun on a cc machine, they make an adaptor box for cc machines.. It was an older Miller Engine drive that a CV adaptor was not available for.

    He had poor success. Very hard to get the thing set up and running smooth, he limped along until he bought a shop machine with CV. Once he ran the aluminum on CV, it wasn't long until he bought a brand spanking new Big Blue 400, with CV on it, from me. I have several customers who build Aluminum truck bodies and dump trailers, they do not have a cc power supply in their shops that is set up to run any mig wire.

    We did have acustomer at one time, since out of business, who used to buy quite a bit of 3/32 aluminum wire in an alloy that I cannot recall at the moment. They did have a couple cc machines with feeders hooked up to them for this purpose, but they were really old behemoths, again I am not certain of their make and models, it was just too long ago.

    I sell thousands of pounds of 3/64 and 1/16 aluminum mig wire monthly, probably 80% 5356 and 20% 4043, I can assure you that all of it is run on CV equipment.

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  • paulrbrown
    replied
    Lots of info, thread sort of got side tracked I think. I am refering to Aluminum GMAW. Stainless and Steel wires I use a Millermatic 250MP, it's just the soft Aluminum which gives me the problems feeding, and as mentioned, ESAB in their Aluminum consumables Catalogue, they feel CC machines are the only way to go. Has anyone tried welding Aluminum with CC machines, you have to have the 'Slow Run In' feature on the wire feeder or it won't work because of too much wire for the current at start. Once Arc is established, the feed speeds up to your welding wire feed setting. I was just wondering if there is anything I need to be aware of. Thanks, Paul

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  • HAWK
    replied
    paulrbrown,

    The CC/CV voltage sensing feeders like the Miller 8VS/12VS suitcase feeders work great on larger wires such as 3/64" up to 5/64". Traditionally the trend has been toward flux cored wire. You can also spray arc with .035" ER70S-6 and up with a hot gas like 92%argon/8% carbon dioxide with good results on such a feeder. A larger wire diameter capacity voltage sensing feeder like the S-32SL is great for the 5/64" to 7/64" wires.

    Typical short arc mig is best done with a CV power source and a constant speed CV feeder such as the 22A or the 8RC/12RC suitcase feeders. As Andy stated mig welding with aluminum and a voltage sensing feeder affords a very small voltage/wire speed window per wire diameter and is bear to tune in.

    The XMT series is a really nice powersource that will run CC/CV voltage sensing feeders, true CV feeders, DC TIG, and STICK. The Cobra-Matics use to be adaptable to Miller power sources and are fine feeders.

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  • ASKANDY
    replied
    Paul,
    Some push pull systems have a setting to let them run as a "Voltage sensing" feeder to use with a CC powersource. The Syncrowave would not be my first choice to do this with buy it works nice with other CC units and some engine drives.
    You Cobra should be fine on the 250 with the right connections or adapter.

    Good luck
    Andy-

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  • paulrbrown
    replied
    Thanks, I had read AWS recomends CC for heavier wires, and ESAB does also, they just don't specify wire diamater, The Cobramatic has wire speed run in, so you can establish arc before main feed speed kicks in. I will have to try both CC and CV, I also have a Millermatic 250MP which makes setting voltage very accurate plus a Bobcat225NT. I will let you know how it works. Paul Brown

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  • ASKANDY
    replied
    I agree with klms54.

    The CC powersource will have a small window of operation where it works good, otherwise it's a pain to fine tune properly. Can it be done....yes, done right...not really. A CV unit will be a good match up for the Cobra.

    A

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  • klsm54
    replied
    Paulrbrown, You are not going to want to power your Cobramatic witha CC power source. There are absolutely no advantages to CC for mig welding. You will be much happier with a CV power supply. I am not sure what your Cobramatic consists of, so I can't say for sure what you need for a power supply.

    Leave a comment:


  • GaryM
    replied
    I am not sure what you are asking.

    But we dont use the 250 to power the XR push-pull

    its a small unit about the same size they use for a power supply its kinda hidden. never took a good look at it.

    Gary

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  • paulrbrown
    replied
    Do you find the CC current of the 250 to be advantages to AL Gmaw? I have just gotten a Cobramatic and want to use it with a 250 synchrowave or my Dynasty 200. I am looking for feed back, thanks, Paul

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  • GaryM
    replied
    Syncowave

    The Syncrowave are really nice units. I own a 180 and use a 250 at my new job building Aluminum jet boats. lots of fun mostly wire with the XR push-pull system.

    Gary

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  • HAWK
    replied
    fun4now,

    Yes AC is required for aluminum TIG. It is possible to weld aluminum with DCSP with pure helium under special circumstances. This procedure is typically used with higher amperage applications 300+ amps.

    AC is the recommended method for aluminum TIG. Lean toward a Dynasty 200DX if you can afford it. The Syncrowave 180SD is also a nice machine. Stay away from the Econo-Tig as it has a very low duty cycle and lacks the features necessary for someone wanting to weld much aluminum on a regular basis.

    I hope this helps. I am partial to the Dynasty series inverters. The Syncrowave 180 and 250 are also very nice machines.

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  • fun4now
    replied
    thought you needed ac tig for aluminum maxstar dc only? im confused ???i thought i would need atleastecono or syncro to tig alum. little help here plz

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  • HAWK
    replied
    sladuca,

    Still no go! You still have a reactive gas in the mix (CO2). TIG: Tungsten Inert Gas. You can run 100% argon for most procedures. A helium addition of 25%, 50%, 75%, 90% to argon will increase your heat for welding thicker and/or larger weldments. Certain specialty applications use an argon/nitrogen mix, but not for steel. Other procedures require an argon/hydrogen mix. Argon and argon/helium mixes are the most common for TIG welding aluminum. Argon is the most common gas used for steel, stainless, and chrome moly .

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  • sladuca
    replied
    what about 75%/25% Argon/CO2 mix?

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