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  • HAWK
    replied
    Originally posted by mikeswelding View Post
    First of all, "Amen" to all previous comments. My first welding job right out of high school was for a farm sprinkler irrigation outfit and every bit of it was galvinized. Fortunately, it was all outdoors and my high school vo-tech training included the risks of galvy.



    Having said all that, since you will need to apply cold galvy to the weld, as mentioned in other posts, consider grinding the galvy off of the area to be welded. It reduces the smoke and allows for a better weld.
    True enough. However, the 6011 will burn right through and saves time.

    Leave a comment:


  • mikeswelding
    replied
    First of all, "Amen" to all previous comments. My first welding job right out of high school was for a farm sprinkler irrigation outfit and every bit of it was galvinized. Fortunately, it was all outdoors and my high school vo-tech training included the risks of galvy.

    Having said all that, since you will need to apply cold galvy to the weld, as mentioned in other posts, consider grinding the galvy off of the area to be welded. It reduces the smoke and allows for a better weld.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    laresmojica,

    I prefer a 6011 rod if the material is thick enough. Otherwise a 7014 works better. 6013 rods also work. In the above order of course.

    CHECK YOUR PM. I RESPONDED BEFORE READING THIS POST.

    GOOD LUCK

    HAWK

    Leave a comment:


  • laresmojica
    replied
    Electrodes

    Originally posted by HAWK View Post
    chilli,

    Stick weld with 7014 3/32" electode on AC if possible. If not, then DCSP works almost as well. AS YOU HAVE BEEN TOLD OVER AGAIN: STAY OUT OF THE FUMES-CUTTING AND WELDING OF GALVANIZED STEEL PUTS OFF HIGHLY TOXIC ALMOST SILKY, STRINGY, WHITE FUMES THAT SPREAD WIDE AND STAY LOW TO THE GROUND. I personally would not weld more than a minimal amount of galvanized steel in a fume extracted environment for any amount of money. I know Blondie is not exaggerating! It can easily kill you! On the positive side: the 7014 rods run well on galvanized steel and the job can be done safely with proper precautions.
    I currently have E6011,7018,and 6011. Can i use any of the electrodes that i have to weld galvanize to steel?

    Leave a comment:


  • MAC702
    replied
    Originally posted by Blondie_486
    look for a bureau of mines acceptance certification on it too.
    It should say "MSHA" which is Mine Safety & Health Admin.

    When you are done, you can spray can it with a cold galvanizing spray. ZRC probably makes the best, and they have one which is the only one I know that will actually match the color of the original hot galv. It's VERY heavy (and expensive) because of its high zinc content, but it keeps everything one color when you are done. I see a lot of galv fences out here that all gray at all the joints. They're cold galv, but not the good stuff that matches the original color.

    Leave a comment:


  • SoCalTA
    replied
    It really stinks and smells all of 100% toxic. Of course I had no clue until weeks later. I was just messing around looking for metal to weld and well being a rookie and all I went ahead and welded the two pieces. Very small beads .. probably no more than 11 inches worth.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    HAWK and Blondie:
    Big 10-4 also old painted fence posts bad news way back when they used lead based paint and those fumes will make you not know your name. Different mistake but similar out come, hospital e-room and lots of O2 for a day or so. I remember the headache as if it were yesterday. And that was outside when I welded it with Flux core, I try not to weld old materials if possible or I wire wheel it till the cows come home.

    Safety begins with us,

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    Blondie,

    Thanks for sharing that. I was much luckier than you, but was down for a week after welding 3 galvanized steel lock hasps to a framed and grated cage. The little string silk like "air worms" are bad news!

    Leave a comment:


  • Blondie_486
    replied
    HAWK Chilli,

    Originally posted by HAWK
    chilli,

    I know Blondie is not exaggerating! It can easily kill you!
    It almost did!!! I was one sick puppy!!! I lost 16 weeks work and was sick for 3 years. I ended up with jaundice and nearly lost my spleen and possibly have sustained some liver damage. It was touch and go for the first 3 weeks.

    Heavy metal poisining is nothing to fool around with the smoke carries the zink in it as well as oxidized zink. Your body doesn't rid it's self of heavy metals they just sort of hang around. The galvanizing when welded produces a lot of sulphur too which exposure to enough of that will make you sick too. One day welding in a plant that handled sulphur made me sick.

    If you have to weld it take the proper precautions and wear a respirator with a charcoal filter and look for a bureau of mines acceptance certification on it too.

    Blondie

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    chilli,

    Stick weld with 7014 3/32" electode on AC if possible. If not, then DCSP works almost as well. AS YOU HAVE BEEN TOLD OVER AGAIN: STAY OUT OF THE FUMES-CUTTING AND WELDING OF GALVANIZED STEEL PUTS OFF HIGHLY TOXIC ALMOST SILKY, STRINGY, WHITE FUMES THAT SPREAD WIDE AND STAY LOW TO THE GROUND. I personally would not weld more than a minimal amount of galvanized steel in a fume extracted environment for any amount of money. I know Blondie is not exaggerating! It can easily kill you! On the positive side: the 7014 rods run well on galvanized steel and the job can be done safely with proper precautions.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blondie_486
    replied
    Chilli,

    Be real careful not to inhale any of the smoke. I got deathly ill from it when I was in high school. The company I worked for didn't know the hazards so I ended up being the guinea pig. I was sick for almost 3 years after 2 days of welding it.

    Blondie

    Leave a comment:


  • timw
    replied
    The plating on galvanized is Zinc. It is toxic when burned during welding. If you stay down wind of it you can get by. Mig is always faster/ easier, if you stay longer in your puddle and let it flow ahead, it will burn off the impurities and you can get a decent weld. If you run too fast it will look like bird poo and be weak. After welding coat it with spray on Cold Galvanize in a can to protect it.

    Leave a comment:


  • jimmy
    replied
    chilli,you could mig or stick it.since you might be welding outside,i would recommend sticking.when welding galvanize,be careful.to much breathing galvanize could be harmfull.

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    Welding galvanized steel

    Chilli,

    You can use either one. But beware of the hazards. The fumes generated when welding plated steels are toxic. You don't want to inhale them. Wear a respirator with filters rated for the hazard, not just plain dust-mask type filters. Weld in a well ventilated area. If you can work outdoors, that's best. The location will probably have more influence on the welding process than anything - GMAW ain't real happy in a wind.

    Be well.

    hankj

    Leave a comment:


  • chilli
    started a topic galvanize steel

    galvanize steel

    I planning to put up a fence in my yard, and I want to make it out of galvanize steel tubing. I've heard it stinks from the odor it releases when welding this material. But I would like to know which process: mig or stick, is the best way to go on this project?
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