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  • Bob Sigmon
    replied
    Blondie,

    I don't get away too much, so there are lots of place that I don't know about. I've lived in Plumouth for 45 years, so I know the immediate neck of the woods pretty well. And I always have Yahoo maps.

    If you find yourself with some time to burn after your company closes, hop on your bike and come on up I'll pay for you gas and take you out for a nice lunch in trade to some pointers and tips!!!

    Wednesdays are my regular day off (well for the last 15 years or so)
    Keep it in mind!!

    Bob Sigmon

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  • Blondie_486
    replied
    Bob,

    Thanks for the invite! I'm about 65 miles southeast of Cleveland in a little town called Hartville. Unless you're into flea markets you've probably never heard of it. We just got our 4th stoplight last year I guess we're a metropolis now!!!

    I don't know where I'll be next as it seems the shop I'm working at now is on it's way out of business and I don't know where I'll find decent work. Right now I'm looking strongly at a company out west that needs a precision TIG welder for stainless vacuum chambers.

    Maybe if I'm still here when the weather turns nicer it'd make a nice bike ride though! At any rate I'll keep it in mind for sure. Thanks again

    Blondie

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  • Bob Sigmon
    replied
    Hawk, Thanks for the thought and I'll be getting to practicing really quick.

    Blondie,

    If you ever want to check out the 200DX without the pressure of the impendening "sale or loss of sale", email me and you are welcome to come to my home shop and check mine out. I don't have any water cooling but I've got two different torchs, regular and clear class gas lens, tons or filler(well, lbs and lbs, really), lots tungstens, 2 Q's of Argon and a bit of small scrap (but you can bring all you want)

    My shop in small and in my basement but it works. Due to current wiring limitations I'm wired into 130VAC 30amps, and this baby really welds. Again, I'm a beginner with about 6 whole hours under my belt, so I certainly can't help with technique but I can provide some great belly laughs by showing you some of my existing practice pieces.

    I'm not sure where in OH you hail from but I'm about 30 min north of the border off US23 and M14.

    Bob Sigmon

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  • HAWK
    replied
    Bob,

    Thanks for the tip. Have a speedy recovery and enjoy that Dynasty!

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  • Bob Sigmon
    replied
    Hawk,pj,blondie, et al.,

    I do a bit gunsmithing and finish repair and tons of gun cleaning. Just go to the local car parts store and get some brake cleaner. It gives a great pressurized spray and really strips off all the grease, oil etc. (Use gloves, full face shield, and fume mask, if outside). This will leave the joint really clean for using a baking soda spray bottle to neutralize any acid. I usually follow each cleaner pass with clean dry air to speed drying and knock loose any surrounding debris.


    Thanks to all you guys for the great info that you provide to us new guys!!! I just coming off about six weeks of back trouble but should be able to get back to my sorely neglected D200DX real soon. What a great machine! ! ! !
    Bob Sigmon

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  • Blondie_486
    replied
    HAWK,

    I haven't seen toulene in years but you're right it probably would work great. We use Xylene and Xylol at work because that's what we thin paint with to paint the stuff we make. At home I have lacquer thinner which has a high acetone content then I take the stuff into work and weld it on my lunch break.

    Blondie

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  • Blondie_486
    replied
    HAWK,

    The day life stops throwing us curve balls is the day we stop living. Learning is a life long process. I learn something new every day whether I consiously realize it or not. We will never see it all.

    Blondie

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  • HAWK
    replied
    Blondie,

    You mentioned xylene. It makes me thing back quite a few years and I wonder if toluene would do a better job. It is simply a benzene ring with a methyl group attached. What do you think? If it will work , I bet it would be hard to come by at the very least.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    PJ,

    Thanks for checking. The sodium bicarbonate makes perfect sense. If I run into this again , I will certainly give it a try. I do appreciate your input. I thought I had seen all the quirky stuff, but I have not and probably never will!

    Leave a comment:


  • Blondie_486
    replied
    PJ Seaman,

    Acetone, lacquer thinner, Xylol and Xylene all work well and flash off quickly. The Acetones and Xylols will cut oil and grease better than Isopropyl alcohol will though so if you have parts that have been subjected to grease the alcohol may not be as effective.

    I guess it doesn't really matter what you're using as long as it's taking the contaminants off and not leaving anything behind that will contaminate the weld.

    Aluminum is rather porous and is liable to absorb lots of things and retain them past grinding, wire wheeling and solvents can get to. Sometimes it's just a pain in the backside to work with!

    Blondie

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Blondie:
    The Alkalai part didn't sound odd the high acid metal is what I was referring to, my appology for not being accurate saying what I ment to say.

    Anyway if it could help great if not it is a small amount of time for the exploration of a solution. Here lately I've been using 99% Isopropyl alcohol for cleaning, it does pretty good but no etching action since what I am welding tubing I don't want to miss any and end up with acid fumes if that is a possibility. Alcohol dries faster too.

    Peace

    Leave a comment:


  • Blondie_486
    replied
    PJ Seaman,

    It doesn't sound odd at all. Baking soda is an alkali which will neutraiize an acid. Try it on corroded battery terminals it works wonders for them.

    Blondie

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Hawk:
    I talked with a friend about what you are fighting he thought maybe this metal may have a high acidity in the base metal. He said if you can try putting 2 table spoons of baking soda into a cup of hot water scrub and brush till dry with a SS brush then weld as normal. I thought it sounded odd but any trick may help if the known tips didn't work.

    Weld well

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    Blondie,

    This piece was supposed to be first quality 3003 when it was made. I would have used 1100 filler, but all I had in 1100 was .063 rod. I had to go with 4043 which is an alternative filler for joining 3003 to 3003 alloy. The white around the edges did not appear until I lowered my EN balance. I have always noticed this white perimeter when I am getting a really good cleaning action with the arc.

    The Dynasty is a nice unit. I am looking to pick up a 300DX around the end of this month if all goes as planned. .250" with the high helium content usually welds just fine. I have even done some 3/8" fillets in a single pass on 6061T-651 without preheat and heavily swirling the arc to get a good toe wash. The bead I posted was not swirled-just straight lined with the filler staying in the arc.

    I think with the history of this piece and customer I would have to go with the base metal has absorbed something that grinding, Scotch-Brite, and acetone just won't remove. I hope it will withstand the test of time. I certainly do not want to see it again!

    Leave a comment:


  • Blondie_486
    replied
    HAWK,

    The bead looks nice but I can visualize in my mind what a tough time you had getting it there. Judging by the white along the edges of the weld it almost looks like battery acid has trickled along where the weld joins the base metal.

    My best guesses would be;

    1. The pores in the aluminum have absorbed the contamination and you haven't found out what to remove it with.

    2. Possible alloy contamination in the aluminum. It is possible the aluminum was made with recycled material such as pop/beer cans and somewhere it has picked up a conatminant in the re-melting process. Recycled metals are never as pure as the ****** stuff. That's true even with steel.

    I've gotten some bad heats of steel out of a re-melting facility in New York that was really nasty to weld. Perhaps that's the case here?

    It looks like you got good penetration and the weld looks good, very uniform considering the circumstances I don't see how you could have done any better. That weld should stand the test of time.

    If ever a time comes you decide to kick the Dynasty to the curb could you see if you could hit my curb? I'm afraid to go and demo one because I know I won't want to leave without one and right now I don't have the cash and now won't have the place to use it either.

    Blondie

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