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  • fun4now
    replied
    SMOKE IT!

    i would say you got a bad saw . you should take the advice of youre repair shop and lock down the blade and smoke the moter right out of that thing so he can give you another 1 b4 you sit out your warenty wondering if it will live or die.it is bleading oil put it out of its misery it has a birth defect.
    i built custom homes for 20 years and never had a dewalt fail.my home shop now is all yellow and blue.well i also have some red (milwauke)another fine tool my sawsall is 15 years old and still strong.
    kill that saw and get on with youre welding

    Leave a comment:


  • karish
    replied
    Wrong Model Number

    No doubt you are correct about the model number. 852 is from another part of my life.

    I hope my experience was unusual. Each time I got the saw back, drips would still form under the gear box by the next day. First answer was "grease will break down and give off oil when it's warm". Probably true, but I am in Alaska, and it was winter, and I hadn't used it to make it warm. We run a kit of DeWalt cordless tools at work and they've been working just fine.

    I can't honestly say if the drip is or isn't a problem yet. I'm hoping I don't find out by burning it up, they're not cheap! I can say it cuts like mad!

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  • MAC702
    replied
    I think you have the DeWalt DW872, in case anyone else wants to look for one. I know because I have one too, only I've never had a lick of problems with it. Best steel saw I've ever used, and I was IN the business!

    Actually, mine's still for sale. Had a few bites, but nothing in the creel yet.

    I owned and daily used over two dozen DeWalt power tools. Only my 7.2V cordless screwdriver recently broke at the clutch. It was repaired under warranty (exactly one year old) in just a couple of weeks turnaround. Most of my DeWalts are older than that, with my hammerdrill the oldest. All have been excellent power tools, and I recommend them highly. Sorry you had such a weird experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • karish
    replied
    DeWalt 852 saw

    Gents,

    I have a DeWalt 852, the 14" carbide dry cut saw. I am not in the business, just a hobbist who is lucky enough to have a wife who used to own a welding and steel supply business. She'd see me cutting material with the elbow operated saw and say "why don't you get a chop saw?". Good enough for me!

    These saws cut very well. Fast, clean, and no blade wonder. The idea works for all the manufacturers.

    Specifically, the DeWalt. I had oil seeping out of the motor casing when I received mine. The packing cardboard was soaked. Contacted DeWalt and got the answer that couldn't happen because they use a grease, not oil in the gear box. A few times around the e-mail tree, and I took it to the local warranty station. Not convinced they even opened it....either time it took it there. There is no provision to check, fill, or replace the lube in the gear box. First time I picked it up from the warranty stattion, the lady made the comment, "Go burn it up". Strange. But, it is working. Don't know if it would be if I were in the business.

    The table and clamping system. I examined many types of chop saws before I purchased, and all of them have just terrible table/clamp set ups. The one nice thing about the DeWalt, is the saw mount is on a flat surface, which simplified making a new table. Have a friend who runs a welding / machine shop who came up with the idea, and made for me a new table. It is 24" X 24" of 1/2" steel plate with a threaded 1/2" hole every 1". Now I use clamps like you would on a mill, or other T-Slot table device. No terribly practicle. I just got lucky (agian) to have a friend who would do this for me.

    Up shot, like the slow carbide blade, not impressed with the DeWalt company (especially the very small writing that says "Made in China"), and all the tables and clamps are sewer fodder.

    Whew! My first novel.

    Leave a comment:


  • tackit
    replied
    I've got a Black & Decker chopper that sits in the corner. It has a very cheap badly designed bed that always cuts crooked. For cutting small rounds and tubbing I spent money on a good heavy blade tension type hacksaw and some lennox blades and have been able to cut amazingly fast and with only a few strokes of a file more accurate. I was just telling the son-in-law last night out in the shop that I can't remember when I changed the blade the last time.


    Next time I go to the dump, I need the space.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    pjseaman
    the standard coarse carbide blade on a power miter box has worked fine for me on aluminum... I keep a stream of spray lube like WD40 at the blade and material juncture... end up with nice clean cuts... have used several different brands of saw and style of blade.. coarse blades with a sharp carbide edge seem to work best.. cuts aluminum like butter... makes a cut as nice as I can do with the milling machine with much quicker setup..... as with anything... careful setup and clamping will help to avoid mishaps...(also make sure that the blade is up to speed before starting the cut and take your time).....
    hope this helps
    Heiti

    Leave a comment:


  • paulrbrown
    replied
    Just a note, DeWalt was purchased in 1960 by Black and Decker, and Skil is owned by Bosch, they consider the Skil brand their lowend or consumer grade. Good info on clamping and not binding the work, I have jammed the blade even while clamped and it always seems to trash the blade. Paul

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Ok nix that idea but did I understand you are using a carbide wood blade for cutting Aluminum, like a 16tooth crosscut? I just want a clear understanding!

    Thanks

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  • timw
    replied
    The abrasive chop saws run about 3600 RPM , the cold saws run about 1200 RPM. You can't swap blades.
    For cutting Aluminum the best thing is a Skil Saw with a carbide blade. Or Wood Chop saw with a carbide blade for precision cuts. It cuts fast and you have to feed slow, if it binds at all the teeth come off and the blade is done. But at a couple bucks for blades it's a bargin. I worked on Semi trailers for years and that's how we cut the side and nose rails when doing a repair. Also cut out sections in Refer floors to section. Some of the rails are 8-9 inches wide and up to 3/8" thick. I cut 1/8" diamond plate with a Skil Saw too. I layed it out with sharpee and clamped 2X4 for straight edge and cut it like plywood. You NEED a full face shield and long sleeve shirt but it works great.

    Leave a comment:


  • JTMcC
    replied
    If I understand you right, you are wanting to put a carbide blade on a chop saw? If so, that's not going to work, these saws run at a much lower rpm than a chop saw. You can buy blades for regular worm drive skill saws tho.

    JTMcC.

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    Thanks JTMcC this looks like it should fit my cheepie just fine and get a step safer in the process. I'll let you know if it works.

    Thanks again: Paul

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  • MAC702
    replied
    I use the DeWalt Multi-Cutter every day. It is a 14" carbide blade.

    I love the saw as far as cutting, but I have to train my help in its use. My father-in-law dulled one big time trying to cut hardened steel, and once while cutting thin-walled tubing, he broke off a few teeth trying to go too fast.

    That said, I'm on my third blade in two years, and they would have lasted even longer. I haven't found a good place to sharpen them cost-effectively, but I'm paying $110 for blades at Economy Steel locally, and bought one on eBay for $80.

    My biggest gripe is the clamp. It sucks, but is still better than the typical abrasive chop saw clamp, which REALLY sucks. Especially when cutting miters does it stick and start an uneven wear in the teeth that never goes away. And the steel ring that held the vise from the bottom was always coming off. I finally welded it on, and did so just a hair too tightly, but it is still a vast improvement over putting it back on every month.

    Leave a comment:


  • JTMcC
    replied
    It's a 1" arbor.

    No coolant

    No, but they call it a "Makita Metal Cutting Saw". They are getting to be pretty common, most welding supplies carry them. Makita has a 12" blade, other brabds use 14". I think the 12" is more accurate cutting angles. The saw is about the size and shape of a regular chop saw. They turn fewer rpm.

    I don't know how they do on aluminum but Makita makes blades for mild steel and for SS, that makes me wonder if they are not suited to cut alu. Aftermarket blades are available. I also have never used one on very thin tube, so I can't comment on that either.

    But they eat shc. 40 for lunch and the resulting chips are a lot neater and easier to clean up than abrasive saw dust. They are real screaming loud tho.

    JTMcC.

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    JTMcC:

    Several questions: 1] what size arbor is your saw?

    2] Does it use a coolant?

    3] Do you by chance know the part number, I might just buy one of these for my old cheapie saw for safety sake alone!?

    I am not very happy with the quality of cuts from the abrasives on Aluminum and mild steel tubing real messy on any angle cutting.

    Thanks

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  • Rob
    replied
    JT,

    Thanks, that's what I needed to know. In the long run, it will be cheaper than an abrasive chop saw! And a lot less mess too!!

    Rob

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