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  • #16
    Blondie,

    I'm with you on that, I've seen more marketing than quality out of DeWalt.

    Rob

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    • #17
      Makita makes what they call a "Dry cutting saw" which sells for about $550 up here in the north. I was quite suprised by the cut quality. When I asked about the blade life the salesman told that in heavy useage the blade would have to be sharpened monthly for about $60 and a new blade was about $150. For that price I thought that abrasives were just fine for me but I don't use it all that much ( small home shop trying to expand) all in all I thought it to be a decent tool that lots of shops have but it depends on $$$ and your own personal preference. Sorry for the long post, hope it helps and good luck!

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      • #18
        Blondie,

        A little off subject, but I agree with your assessment of "yellow" tools - like yellow snow, stay away! Kinda sad, too. If you visit a full-line lumber yard that's 30 years old os so, you'll invariably see a big DeWalt radial arm saw. New yard? Delta saw!

        I use Milwaukee or Porter-Cable tools for the most part, but I confess to owning a couple of pre-made-in-China Makita tools that have lasted well.

        Be well.

        hankj
        ...from the Gadget Garage
        Millermatic 210 w/3035, BWE
        Handler 210 w/DP3035
        TA185TSW
        Victor O/A "J" series, SuperRange

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        • #19
          Hankj,

          I was merely pointing out the cast table on the Milwaukee saw, very sturdy. Other than that I was refering to the diamond saws that don't use the abrasive wheels, the only one I've seen is a Porter Cable and that was at the local hardware store.

          I will agree on the radial arm saws though it's hard to beat an ol green DeWalt radial arm saw. As for the newer yards I think Delta makes the sturdiest radial arm saw available "new" today.

          Oh well what are we going to do? Buy what we've had good luck with!

          But the abrasive wheels I buy the good ones to avoid any problems due to inferior manufacturing procedures. You can make just about any of the saws available whether U.S. built or foreign built do the job if you use them properly and put a GOOD wheel on them. I guess it all depends on how much you use your saw as to how expensive of saw you need. So whether you have a top of the line saw or a taiwan freddie saw put a good abrasive wheel on it and you should be OK.

          Blondie
          Blondie (Owner C & S Automotive)

          Colt the original point & click interface!

          Millermatic 35 with spot panel
          Miller 340A/BP
          Victor O/A torches
          Lincoln SP125
          Too many other tools to list

          03 Ram 1500
          78 GS1000
          82 GL1100 Interstate

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          • #20
            Cold Saw

            Guys
            given my druthers... would prefer to cut all of my material on a Scotchman "Cold Saw" .... but at least for the moment that is priced out of the question... looks like these new dry saws are a less expensive version.... and may be a viable alternative... but think I will wait a little bit and see how blade life works out in real life....the cold saws are wet and low rpm.. BTW if you are cutting a lot of aluminum shapes... a good compound mitre saw with a carbide blade cuts it like butter.. and if you wet the blade with a little bit of spray lube before each cut.. the blades last almost forever..(aluminum ONLY!!)
            take care
            Heiti
            .

            *******************************************
            The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

            “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

            Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

            My Blue Stuff:
            Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
            Dynasty 200DX
            Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
            Millermatic 200

            TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

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            • #21
              Well, I figured I'd use this machine yesterday, just for drill. Wanted to mitre some 1/4" x 2" angle for the top of the stand that will hold this saw when it's done. 14" blade is now 13" blade after one cut. Finished the cuts on the bandsaw. It looks like I'll be using this tool more for quick cuts on light flat stock and tube. For sure, it DO cut, though.

              Be well.

              hankj
              ...from the Gadget Garage
              Millermatic 210 w/3035, BWE
              Handler 210 w/DP3035
              TA185TSW
              Victor O/A "J" series, SuperRange

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Rob
                Anybody tried the new saws offered by DeWalt and others? A small metal supplier I sometimes use had one in use the last time I stopped by. It had a 12" carbide tipped blade, and cut mild steel tubing in about 1/3 the time of my abrasive chop saw. I found them on the Dewalt web site, with a suggested retail about twice that of an abrasive unit, but didn't know about expected life of the blade, etc. to get an idea of long term operating cost.

                Would appreciate anybody's experience with one of the carbide units before I go buy one.

                Rob

                P.S. - The carbide saw should cut aluminum like butter.

                I have a Makita, bought on the recomendation of a friend of mine with a welding business who had used several brands.
                The Makita has a better table and clamp, they are much more sturdy than any small chop saw.
                My saw has made over 6500 (the only reason I know the number is that I figured it in the bid process)cuts and is on it's second blade, the first blade is in pretty rough shape but is still sharpenable, the second one is in good shape, but should go to the sharpener soon.
                This is all on 1 1/2" and 2" sch 40 pipe. They cut angles much, much better than a chop saw, the blades won't deflect. And they cut very fast, faster than I would have believed without using one.
                I haven't used it on any other material but pipe, except for a few misc. things. And only on CS so far.
                Blades run around &80 and up. I buy mine from the local welding supply for around $90, makita brand.

                JTMcC.
                Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

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                • #23
                  JT,

                  Thanks, that's what I needed to know. In the long run, it will be cheaper than an abrasive chop saw! And a lot less mess too!!

                  Rob

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                  • #24
                    JTMcC:

                    Several questions: 1] what size arbor is your saw?

                    2] Does it use a coolant?

                    3] Do you by chance know the part number, I might just buy one of these for my old cheapie saw for safety sake alone!?

                    I am not very happy with the quality of cuts from the abrasives on Aluminum and mild steel tubing real messy on any angle cutting.

                    Thanks

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      It's a 1" arbor.

                      No coolant

                      No, but they call it a "Makita Metal Cutting Saw". They are getting to be pretty common, most welding supplies carry them. Makita has a 12" blade, other brabds use 14". I think the 12" is more accurate cutting angles. The saw is about the size and shape of a regular chop saw. They turn fewer rpm.

                      I don't know how they do on aluminum but Makita makes blades for mild steel and for SS, that makes me wonder if they are not suited to cut alu. Aftermarket blades are available. I also have never used one on very thin tube, so I can't comment on that either.

                      But they eat shc. 40 for lunch and the resulting chips are a lot neater and easier to clean up than abrasive saw dust. They are real screaming loud tho.

                      JTMcC.
                      Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I use the DeWalt Multi-Cutter every day. It is a 14" carbide blade.

                        I love the saw as far as cutting, but I have to train my help in its use. My father-in-law dulled one big time trying to cut hardened steel, and once while cutting thin-walled tubing, he broke off a few teeth trying to go too fast.

                        That said, I'm on my third blade in two years, and they would have lasted even longer. I haven't found a good place to sharpen them cost-effectively, but I'm paying $110 for blades at Economy Steel locally, and bought one on eBay for $80.

                        My biggest gripe is the clamp. It sucks, but is still better than the typical abrasive chop saw clamp, which REALLY sucks. Especially when cutting miters does it stick and start an uneven wear in the teeth that never goes away. And the steel ring that held the vise from the bottom was always coming off. I finally welded it on, and did so just a hair too tightly, but it is still a vast improvement over putting it back on every month.

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                        • #27
                          Thanks JTMcC this looks like it should fit my cheepie just fine and get a step safer in the process. I'll let you know if it works.

                          Thanks again: Paul

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                          • #28
                            If I understand you right, you are wanting to put a carbide blade on a chop saw? If so, that's not going to work, these saws run at a much lower rpm than a chop saw. You can buy blades for regular worm drive skill saws tho.

                            JTMcC.
                            Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              The abrasive chop saws run about 3600 RPM , the cold saws run about 1200 RPM. You can't swap blades.
                              For cutting Aluminum the best thing is a Skil Saw with a carbide blade. Or Wood Chop saw with a carbide blade for precision cuts. It cuts fast and you have to feed slow, if it binds at all the teeth come off and the blade is done. But at a couple bucks for blades it's a bargin. I worked on Semi trailers for years and that's how we cut the side and nose rails when doing a repair. Also cut out sections in Refer floors to section. Some of the rails are 8-9 inches wide and up to 3/8" thick. I cut 1/8" diamond plate with a Skil Saw too. I layed it out with sharpee and clamped 2X4 for straight edge and cut it like plywood. You NEED a full face shield and long sleeve shirt but it works great.

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                              • #30
                                Ok nix that idea but did I understand you are using a carbide wood blade for cutting Aluminum, like a 16tooth crosscut? I just want a clear understanding!

                                Thanks

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