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  • ASKANDY
    replied
    JWELD,

    Do the 2050. I have the same Trailblazer you have and have no problems on it. I also have the Diesel version and really can't tell the difference. The 625 is nice too but I like the fact that you can remove the torch from the 2050 when in transit.

    Good luck

    Andy

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hawk:

    I want to only buy another Plasma Cutter and it be the last. I assume you always get the biggest you can>

    Thanks

    Have a "DRAG GUN Thermal" also, it also is pitiful.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    JWELD,

    You are correct! The 2050 may have a slight edge on your Trailblazer because of its Auto-Line circuitry.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hawk:

    I meant the 2050, not the 1250.
    My trailblazer 280nt has 8500 Watts aux.

    I am assuming I should still go with the 2050 as my Trailblazer is going to put out the same performance either with the 625 or 2050 if it is restricted by underpowered output, Right? Yet the 2050 with outperform the 625 by far in the shop.

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    Cutting Combo: Trailblazer + Spectrum 2050

    JWELD,

    The Trailblazer does not have the aux power output to drive the 1250. It requires 74+ amps at 230VAC 3 phase power at the rated duty cycle. The Trailblazer is a single phase aux power machine. I am running the 2050 Spectrum from the Trailblazer (10KW) aux power with 50 amps at 240VAC. I believe the 280 Trailblazer has the same aux power output. Correct me if I am wrong.

    The Spectrum 2050 is a great cutting companion for the Trailblazer. I am getting great 1" sever cuts and excellent 3/4"-7/8" rated, quality cuts with this set up. The 2050 has a 55 amp output, but I run it at about 47 amps on the output. This seems to be the ideal setting for the machine when powered by the Trailblazer.

    The 2050 is capable of running from 1 or 3 phase shop power and will be right at home in the shop or on the road. I cut a lot of 3003 and 5052 1/4" aluminum plate and a fair amount of 3/8" 6061-T651 aluminum plate. I am sure it will cut thicker aluminum, but I don't work with much over a 3/8" so I cannot say for sure. I have already mentioned what it will do on mild steel (3/4"-7/8") rated and quality with 1" severs. This is on generator power and will only improve on shop power!

    If costs and weight (about 75 lbs) are not an issue, the 2050 is the way to go. Out of the 12 plasma cutter units I have tested within the last 12 months, only the Miller 625 and 2050 have really shined when powered by the Trailblazer. The little Hypertherm Power Max 600 advertised great performance when powered by a generator, but I was barely able to cut 3/8' mild steel. It was a very disappointing demo.

    Set your Trailblazer at run, not run idle. Set your selector switch to remote stick and the panel/remote switch to remote. This will give you the maximum available current output from the machine.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Thanks Hawk, as always you give us all the answers.

    This forum has been a great relief as I don't have to spend hours searching for answers and then wondering if they are right.

    I have decided to go ahead and by a new plasma cutter as the one I have now is a "Pak 50" by Thermal Dynamics and was sold to me by a Millere dealer in Phoenix whi stated it had a quality 1/2" cut and is far superior than a MIller.
    Believe it or not I have yet to even take the torch out of the box and fire it up.
    I want a "MILLER".
    I am leaning toward the 1250 vs the 625. $$ not being the issue, is thier any disadvantage to the 1250vs 625, mobile on Trailblazer etc. Most work will be in shop.
    Your input again would be appreciated.
    Thanks
    Jweld

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    JWELD,

    No. It is not really a fair question. Many rods can be worked in a variety of ways. The 7018 up to 5/32" is an all position "drag" rod to some extent. You do drag the rod and push it into the puddle as it burns. It is a low hydrogen rod requiring dry storage if possible. It is a high flux rod. If you try much weave on your root pass, the penetration will decrease dramatically. This is a high strength rod when properly applied. Your work pieces need to be prepped and clean prior to welding. These rods run DCRP and can be bought in an AC version also.

    The 7024 and 7028 rods are true drag rods and used mostly in position or in horizontal fillet welds. You basically drag the rod. They lay in easily and are sometimes referred to as "JET" rods. The larger diameter 7024 and 7028 rods roar and whistle like a jet engine when burning just right. Again be sure to properly prep and clean you work. These are DCRP rods.

    The 6010 rods are typically worked in and out of the puddle (stepped) or in a CCW circular motion. They are a fast freezing, deep penetrating rod and ideal for all position work. The deep penetrating action is great for dirty and rusted metal. It is run as a DCRP rod.

    The 7014 rod is good for filling in poor fit up areas and can be dragged to some extent. It does require some amount of weave to completely wash the weld toes. This rod gives a medium amount of penetration and is considered a general purpose rod. This rod is great for irregular runs like uphill diagonal travel and then going downhill diagonal without breaking the arc. It burns well on AC and DCSP. It really prefers AC. Sometimes the DCSP will leave a humped bead with pinholes.

    The 6013 rod is a general purpose mild steel rod that runs well on AC and DCSP. It works well for sheet metal on up to 1/4" mild steel weldments not requiring structural weld qualities. I consider this a household/light farm repair type rod.

    I hope this helps and has not confused you. I run 6010 and 7018 rods for 90% of my stick welding. The remaining 10% is made up of specialty alloys, dissimilar metals, and cast rods.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest started a topic Sticfk Again??

    Sticfk Again??

    Which rods can you "drag" vs. "Step" or "Weave" when stick welding.
    I hope this is a fair question.

    Thanks
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