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Multimatic 200 questions ... 110v?? 115v??

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  • Multimatic 200 questions ... 110v?? 115v??

    Hi everyone, this is my first post. I've been reading about the multimatic 200 , and I've been wondering if it needs an adapter to use it on the common 110v and 220v receptacles. I know it says 115v and 230v , so I wanted to know if I needed to buy extra stuff to make it work. Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    110,115,120v= really the same thing

    220,230,240v= same thing


    http://www.millerwelds.com/products/...p?model=M00361


    Click on the video regarding the MVP plugs
    Ed Conley
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    • #3
      Thank you I appreciate it. So any 115v-120v works with a 110v receptacle?
      Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
      110,115,120v= really the same thing

      220,230,240v= same thing


      http://www.millerwelds.com/products/...p?model=M00361


      Click on the video regarding the MVP plugs

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Turbosmart4 View Post
        Thank you I appreciate it. So any 115v-120v works with a 110v receptacle?
        From Wiki...
        "In the United States and Canada, national standards specify that the nominal voltage at the source should be 120 V and allow a range of 114 V to 126 V (RMS) (−5% to +5%). Historically 110 V, 115 V and 117 V have been used at different times and places in North America. Mains power is sometimes spoken of as 110 V; however, 120 V is the nominal voltage."
        MillerMatic 211 Auto-set w/MVP
        Just For Home Projects.

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        • #5
          Thank you , sir
          Originally posted by Doughboyracer View Post
          From Wiki...
          "In the United States and Canada, national standards specify that the nominal voltage at the source should be 120 V and allow a range of 114 V to 126 V (RMS) (−5% to +5%). Historically 110 V, 115 V and 117 V have been used at different times and places in North America. Mains power is sometimes spoken of as 110 V; however, 120 V is the nominal voltage."

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          • #6
            Multimatic 200 questions ... 110v?? 115v??

            If you know how to use a multimeter and can safely check the voltage at one of your outlets, I think you'll be surprised to find that it will likely read somewhere in the 124-ish volts range. The "110" designation is merely a scope of range. Some guys actually get all bent out of shape over it, glad to see no body got their panties knotted up this time.

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            • #7
              Most devices and machines now are multi voltage. Most electronics (cell phones, cameras, computers) all run 110-240v, 50-60htz. It really is nice when you travel since you don't have to worry about transformers... just plugs. Some countries like Brazil don't even have a standard voltage; they run 120 (most common) to 240, and have just started standardizing outlets and plugs. They used to use US, European, and now have their own standard just to add to the fun of it all.

              Unfortunately, the US still uses 120 which is a poor choice. Europe, after WWII had to rebuild everything, and based on fact that fewer households had electrical appliances compared to US. They picked 240/50hz as it was the more efficient way to transmit electricity, while minimizing power loss trough the copper. I had read somewhere up to 50% of energy is lost from creation to consumption.

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