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  • iso50
    replied
    Originally posted by jeffscarstrucks
    Don't forget that a good welding education and some experience can open a lot of doors to welding related fields that offer other challenges like teaching, sales, manufacturing consulting or many other related fields. Good luck and study, Jeff
    School doesn't start until August, so part will have to wait

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  • jeffscarstrucks
    replied
    Don't forget that a good welding education and some experience can open a lot of doors to welding related fields that offer other challenges like teaching, sales, manufacturing consulting or many other related fields. Good luck and study, Jeff

    Leave a comment:


  • MACH4
    replied
    Originally posted by iso50
    Ok, now for a simple question:

    How much do welders make? Esp those just starting out (with tech school training).
    iso50,
    At the 'day' job they start tech grads. at $16.50 per hr. with a review in 30 days. The review usually results in absolutly nothing until 1 year. As for welding "guys" that have their own equip. the price can range from $40- $60 per hour, in my area. As I have posted in the past, weld it well and the customers will come to you. You might end up eating beans and weinies for awhile but if you do quality work at a fair price[ for your area ] you WILL make a decent living.Hope this helps!! Weld well!!!!!!!!!!
    Mike
    MACH4

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  • iso50
    replied
    Originally posted by HAWK
    iso50,

    First the knowledge, then the practice, experience will come in time.

    BEST OF LUCK!!!
    I'm reading the Miller books, and hope to get a welder soon. I am in the process of signing up for a Technical Dimploma in Fab/weld.

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  • HAWK
    replied
    iso50,

    First the knowledge, then the practice, experience will come in time.

    BEST OF LUCK!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • iso50
    replied
    Seems like a good paying profession, once you are expreianced.

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  • HAWK
    replied
    iso50,

    That's a tough question: We have a plant here in TN that TIGS SS pipe fitting assemblies. The work is very clean and strictly fusion TIG without filler. It is 8 hours per day and starts a 40K/year and tops at 52K/year.

    There is an aircraft parts plant in Ohio that TIGS a titanium alloy for one of the major aircraft companies and their welders make about 55K/year. These guys are experienced aricraft aluminum welders and the few that can do the job are lucky to be there. It is extremely tough work.

    There are also plenty of 25K/year welding jobs out for grabs as we speak. If you are good and know all the processes, your chances of the higher dollars are better. With experience and good luck you may land a great high tech welding job, but don't bank that one until it happens. Those jobs are hard to get and easy to loose.

    It all depends on where you are and what type work you want.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    iso50
    here is a link to salary.com will need to enter your own zip and choose welding skill level from the skilled trades column.. the results may surprise you...

    http://swz.salary.com/salarywizard/l...pe=1&x=39&y=10

    hope this helps
    Heiti

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  • iso50
    replied
    Ok, now for a simple question:

    How much do welders make? Esp those just starting out (with tech school training).

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    iso50,

    It sounds you have all your answers in front of you. As the owner of a mobile welding repair service I want to add a few things from experience. Learn all the processes: Stick, MIG, TIG in that order. If you will put in the time to learn and hone the necessary skills for all the major welding process, then you will be right at home no matter what you decide to do in the welding field. I utilize all three processes all the time. Stick is an excellent choice for outdoors because it is not sensitive to the wind and other elements. It is still the choice for pipe lining and structural fabrication. There are a number of stick electrodes available to meet the necessary requirements you may face. MIG is a great choice for indoor shop fabrication and production. It is fast and clean. TIG is the choice for highly critical and/or precision welds from nuclear piping to aluminum and stainless fabrication.

    The Dynasty 200DX is a nice machine by any standard and is a high quality precision TIG/Stick machine. If you are dead set on purchasing a machine prior to your classes, this is a good choice. For stick welding the set up and use is straight forward. The TIG set up is considerably more complicated, but can be done without formal training.

    Bad habits are hard to break. If you learn bad habits for stick and TIG welding with this or any other machine, you will have to pay the price of correcting these habits once you have leaned the correct techniques. This can be easier said than done. Bad habits can cause weld defects and weld failure.

    If you decide to purchase the Dynasty Stick/TIG or any other machine, Miller has some very good educational CDs available. There are also online resources, libraries, this forum and other valuable sources for information. Take some time and research your decision. One thing I can tell you is one process builds on another. You can learn any or all the processes in any order you desire, but you are making it hard on yourself by doing so. Remember:SMT: STICK ; MIG ; TIG.

    One more thought. There are a lot of good MIG welders out there who know no other process. Yes, they are good MIG welders, but are limited to what they can do. You do not sound like someone who will happy learning only one process and being limited to what you can do.

    Decisions, Decisions.

    Leave a comment:


  • iso50
    replied
    Originally posted by ASKANDY
    The welding field is great. I applaud your choice. The country is at an all time low in skilled welders. According to the Hobart Institute, the number of welding jobs is going up and the quantity of skilled labor is going down. Therefore it's safe to say you should be able to find work. You may have to relocate but it's worth the effort. This is why some of us who own welding businesses can make a go of it. Some of my work is from companies that can't find enough welders for themselves. I'm sure Heiti or HAWK can attest to this. Not sure how much business they do in production type work but it's a nice repeat pay check for awhile.

    Good luck

    Andy
    When you live 3 miles from the Miller HQ, it seemed like an oppotunity I wouldn't have thought of otherwise. I guess you can blame Discovery Communications (cable tv) for my interest. Shows like American Chopper, Monster Garage and Junkyard Wars for example.

    Leave a comment:


  • ASKANDY
    replied
    The welding field is great. I applaud your choice. The country is at an all time low in skilled welders. According to the Hobart Institute, the number of welding jobs is going up and the quantity of skilled labor is going down. Therefore it's safe to say you should be able to find work. You may have to relocate but it's worth the effort. This is why some of us who own welding businesses can make a go of it. Some of my work is from companies that can't find enough welders for themselves. I'm sure Heiti or HAWK can attest to this. Not sure how much business they do in production type work but it's a nice repeat pay check for awhile.

    Good luck

    Andy

    Leave a comment:


  • iso50
    replied
    Originally posted by H80N
    iso50
    a visit to the factory would be great since you are so close.. maybe Andy could hook you up with a good contact....
    some thoughts.... a good welder/fabricator is combination.. engineer, metalurgist, craftsman and artist... plus lots more... it can be a very rewarding and satisfying path to take in life....
    for what it is worth.. I started out there.. then went back to school and pursued a highly technical and higher profile career for many years.. finally came back to what I enjoy the most.. and could not be happier...
    whatever path you take.. do what you enjoy and enjoy what you do.. then do the best you are able..... and excellence will follow......
    take care
    Heiti
    I tried a job in the computer field, but alas as soon as you are out of school, what you know is obsolete. I tried photogaphy (and will do that on my own), but working at a newspaper..well lets just say they dont pay much more than minimum wage

    Leave a comment:


  • ASKANDY
    replied
    mig or tig...mig or tig....that is the question

    Each process has it's place. As Heiti said, there are a bunch of low dollar MIG units around but the need for a TIG to do specialized welding would be great. However, if you are doing this to restore a car or to build benches, repair equipment, there are somethings more suited for MIG. TIG requires the material to be free of contaminants, rust, paint, oil....However a MIG unit will be more versitile in a "not so perfect" welding environment. If you are going to learn to be a welder/fabricator, the need to learn BOTH processes will be a must anyway. I personally am fond to TIG but in a production environment where I need to make some money and be competetive with other job shops around here, MIG is the way to go. I would have to say 70% of my jobs are MIG with the rest precision TIG. I do charge more for TIG work so $ for $ it comes out close. I like your idea of visiting the factory. I'd take you through myself if I was going to be in the area soon but unfortunately I will be traveling with our race teams most of the summer. You may contact me directly at [email protected] and I'll get a contact for you in the training department.
    Like someone said before, it all comes down to your goals. I'd hate, however, for you do get a TIG and develop some bad habbits before going through your classes. TIG requires a bit more set up knowledge than MIG.

    Good luck

    Andy

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    iso50
    a visit to the factory would be great since you are so close.. maybe Andy could hook you up with a good contact....
    some thoughts.... a good welder/fabricator is combination.. engineer, metalurgist, craftsman and artist... plus lots more... it can be a very rewarding and satisfying path to take in life....
    for what it is worth.. I started out there.. then went back to school and pursued a highly technical and higher profile career for many years.. finally came back to what I enjoy the most.. and could not be happier...
    whatever path you take.. do what you enjoy and enjoy what you do.. then do the best you are able..... and excellence will follow......
    take care
    Heiti

    Leave a comment:

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